Do they check income for foster parents?

posted 3 years ago in Adoption & Surrogacy
Post # 16
Member
4002 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

lawandbeauty53:  this. 

Might be one of the weirder posts I’ve seen in awhile.

Post # 17
Member
854 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

I tend to agree with previous posters- this is a bad idea. Foster children have usually been through quite a bit and have needs that only experienced parents who are dedicated can really meet. These kids often have behaviors that are a result of trauma or neglect and require therapies, working closely with schools and an abundance of attention. That said, foster parents are NOT compensated nearly enough (in my opinion). Compensation never actually covers the cost of the child’s needs and clothing vouchers and such are usually a one time thing just after placement.

Foster parents go through a complete investigation for licensing. They will have backgrounds checked and be finger printed, go through training and have extensive and in depth interviews and home visits. Financial stability is definitely a consideration. In 13 years of working in public child welfare, I can’t think of one foster family who was on public assistance. Some families lived frugal lives so that they could provide for the kids but they had a stable income.

I really think that you may want to revisit the idea of foster parenting after you have some kids of your own and do it for the right reasons- to help children in need- not just to practice parenting on them.

Post # 18
Member
962 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2016 - San Clemente Church, Italy

Cheekie0077:  Yeah, starter children? Just awful…and since income is already an issue for this couple and they “just want to try it out for a few years until they are ready for REAL children” (Opposed to the poor, broken or damaged ones).

What is the real motivation here to foster, is it monetary gain?—like from a hobby or side job?

Post # 19
Member
1740 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

The rules vary state by state.  So, for example, in constrast to what one PP said, in NC the kids can share a room, but they do have to have an actual bedroom with a door and closet (no modified rooms).  Also in NC, foster parents receive a small stipend (often in the form of child support from the biological parents), WIC (if the kids meet the age requirements), subsidized daycare, and a clothing allowance for the kids, but it is still not enough to cover all the expenses.  But if your SO works full-time, you probably still make enough to qualify.

I do agree with the PP that foster kids are not a “trial run” for biological kids.  Indeed, they are often have emotional problems that are harder to deal with than your biological kids may have….  I think fostering is better suited for parents who already have experience, rather than new parents.

Post # 20
Member
3611 posts
Sugar bee

This might not have dawned on you, but foster children are people too, not practice egg babies like in middle school health class.

Post # 21
Member
4002 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

lawandbeauty53:  her word choice was problematic to say the least. I hope she realizes that fostering a child takes someone with incredible patience, responsibility, discipline, compassion, etc. I’ve worked with kids who are foster children and their lives are anything but simple. It is not a trial run for parenting, it IS parenting! A foster parent also must become a role model for these children. 

Post # 22
Member
3611 posts
Sugar bee

lawandbeauty53:  I wondered this myself. People who actually should be fostering children wouldn’t be this concerned about income and money.

Post # 23
Member
32 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2016

Really depends on your area. Mostly no. If your making enough to make ends meet, thats usually fine. If for example both people weren’t working or barely working that would raise some concerns. I would call a foster agency in the area and get an interview. There are dozens of classes to take and workshops to do before even being eligible so start now!

Post # 25
Member
962 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2016 - San Clemente Church, Italy

Notwithstanding posts to the contrary, money is is a COMMON motive for fostering..In Florida, on the foster page website, it lists $539 per month for a healthy 13 year old child. Many of the kids have disabilities it can easily beover $1,000. 

That’s significant money for someone without a lot of money…and significant motivation:

Post # 26
Member
609 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2015

If you don’t want kids yet, you shouldn’t take on foster children yet, either. I’m not going to comment on the gross implications of the rest of your post.

Post # 28
Member
2184 posts
Buzzing bee

fiona1992:  Sounds like you’d be better off with a babysitting gig ‘for a few years’ if you want to try your hand at child care. Foster kids are just as much of a commitment (financially, emotionally) as biological kids–if you’re not ready for the latter you’re sure as hell not ready for the former. 

Post # 29
Member
962 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2016 - San Clemente Church, Italy

I don’t mean to overstate the point that I don’t think OP is anywhere NEAR being ready for parenthood, but instead of engaging over fostering questions SHE asked, she initiates a FART stories post (SMMFH), so:

“Uhmm, I guess it’s a no go on that whole parenthood thing, so can you please post your Best Fart Stories, you know, just for fun”? What in the cyber fuck is happening here?

Post # 30
Member
3611 posts
Sugar bee

lawandbeauty53:  You and me both, lady. I saw the fart thread and wondered the exact same thing.

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