Do you care what people think of your child's name?

posted 3 years ago in Babies
Post # 46
Member
730 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2016

I don’t care what other people think about names, but we did restrict ourselves to standard names when choosing for our boys for simplicity’s sake. I think obviously made up names or spellings might get some judgement that I wouldn’t want my kid to deal with in the adult world. Dax doesn’t feel made up and the spelling makes sense, so it would be totally viable in our book. It’s all in how the person carries the name and makes it their own. If you’re worried, try selecting a middle name that is a legitimate backup that he could go by if he doesn’t care for his name. 

Post # 47
Member
8000 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

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tiffanybruiser :  I guess the issue is what you view as “totally f*cked”. So I’d rather name a child Moon Unit than some of the other names I’ve seen as a teacher. I will not mention some of them because they could be associated with different groups of people and my point is not to disparage anyone in particular. But I can guarantee that I’ve seen worse. 

I, personally, have a problem with naming a child a nickname instead of the full name, but that is, admittedly, my own issue. I worked with a colleague named Rick and I once asked him, as I was filling out a form, whether his given name was Richard or Rick. He turned 3 shades of red and then admitted that his given name on his birth certificate was Ricky. I didn’t poke any fun, of course, but I did – in my head – berate his parents for not giving him a “proper” name (not that it’s my position to decide what’s proper).

But I resolved that I’d never name a child Ben instead of Benjamin, or Mike instead of Michael, or Drew instead of Andrew. Indeed, I loved the name Dru/Drew for a girl, but the only full feminine name that shortened to it was Drucilla, and I wasn’t willing to do that. Dax sounds like a shortened version of something, though I don’t know what. I rather like the idea of using a first name beginning with Da and a middle name beginning with an X and then shortening it to Dax (Daniel Xavier, Dalton Xander, etc.).

Post # 48
Member
7268 posts
Busy Beekeeper

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echomomm :  That’s true, it is somewhat subjective what constitutes a totally fucked name. What I meant is that I wouldn’t give my child a name that would almost certainly raise eyebrows nearly everywhere they went throughout their entire life…I guess that’s where I’d draw the line. I think Moon Unit would do that for most people. A name like “Ricky” or “Ben” would not have that effect.

Post # 49
Member
719 posts
Busy bee

I love Dax Shepherd so that would be a yes for me! We already have a two letter surname so a longer first name could work well for us. We have a few names picked out between ‘common and novelty’ categories so I think we’re safe! We’re probably a year off from ttc but it’s fun to discuss names when we hear a unique one or really crazy one. 

Post # 50
Member
733 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2016 - Wedgewood Las Vegas

No kids yet, but I’m/we’re pretty set on some old fashioned type names  if we’re ever blessed to have a child.

I do think you need to take into account how your society will handle the name, since it’s been shown that weird or wacky names can turn off potential employers or cause your child issues throughout schooling. However, unless its really racially/culturally insensitive, or some purposeful bizarre misspelling,  I don’t think most parents have to worry too much.

I’ve never heard of a kid named Dax. However, I wouldn’t also immediately attach a horrible stigma to it either. Unfortunately, I’m not on your side of the world, so my opinion may not mean too much. laughing

Post # 51
Member
2819 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2018

Personally, I find the whole concept of a name giving anyone a disadvantage completely ridiculous. We don’t choose our own names, they are given to us. How could anyone possibly determine that a John will be a more reliable worker than a Dreshawn or an Ophelia or a Calliope. Anyone who looks at a resume and makes a preconceived judgement on the same instead of the content needs to confront their personal bias. I’m not Australian but I am from a very rural section of the midwest where any name that can’t be rooted back to religion is considered “unique.” Dax is not a common name but it is not horrendous and I wouldn’t so much as give it another thought if I met a baby Dax. 

Post # 54
Member
1969 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

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Brickette :  omg my husband wanted this name for our baby too and I like it but think it’s too short because our last name is also one syllable.  It’s basically like Dax Smith except our last name is also a D. We’re for sure giving our baby a D name though because we’re both Ds. Use it since I’m not! 😂

Post # 55
Member
2208 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2018

I like names that have a good meaning.  Just checked & Dax has no meaning. Sounds a bit made up to me 

Post # 56
Member
1969 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

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blondie603 :  I knew an Anass which is terrible. Pronounced  Uh-noss like ross.

Post # 57
Member
8000 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

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smalltownbigworld :  While this is absolutely true, there are things called implicit biases. Implicit biases function in all of us, regardless of our intentions. They are the things that make us have knee-jerk reactions for or against certain names. Indeed, studies show that even women researchers have implicit biases against female grad students/assistants. People don’t WANT to have these reactions, nor do they intend to; they just do. 

I would love it if everyone could overcome their biases simply by willing it to be so, but unfortunately the world doesn’t work that way. Dreshawn may be a far better or far worse worker than John, but some people – based on name alone – may choose Dreshawn while others may choose John. It is a fact, and despite it not being fair, it does exist. I would personally prefer if people were chosen for University and jobs based on applications with NO NAMES AT ALL. That would be most fair – no preconceived notions of gender, nationality, religion, ethnicity or anything else clouding judgement. But until that happens, we need to presume that people will – intentionally or unintentionally – choose or reject people partially based on their names.

Post # 59
Member
2776 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

Eh, I wouldn’t worry. I work at a big university, so well over 30,000 students aged 18-22. So many of them have weird names. In fact, when I see a Samantha or a Grace or a Jane, I do a double take. When half of a demographic has “unique” names (by that, I mean newer or creatively spelled or unisex or whatever), you can’t exactly discriminate as freely as you could 10-20 years ago. I see students named James fail out of school and students named Harley or Stone or Jayden get into med school with straight A’s. 

Post # 60
Member
955 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

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Brickette :  just remember your naming a person not a pet so this boy or girl will grow to be an adult and then a senior …this name will be called at graduation looked at and judge in business and all future endeavors…

 

We choose Nicholas and Jack as these names will be good for all of the above never embarrassing or ppl thinking what a weird name what were his / her parents thinking 

 

Just my two cents …FYI anyone looking to bash me don’t bother this is just my opinion on naming a child 

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