Do you care what people think of your child's name?

posted 3 months ago in Babies
Post # 107
Member
109 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

Brickette :  Hey I think Dax is cute! As a fellow Aussie and soon to be primary school teacher I am fairly sure he will be called Daxy/ie and Daxo at school and by his friends. That sounds super bogan and you won’t be able to stop it! sealed So it really depends on if you can handle it!

 

Post # 108
Member
1308 posts
Bumble bee

MiniMeow :  A major part of it is that I don’t want my future child to have the same name as multiple kids in her year, I have a very common name, which is good in some ways as people always know how to spell it, but I hate people having the same name as me and being known as Aries F instead of just Aries (obviously Aries is not my real name).

I would equate chavs to white trash, in that no one is born a chav, people decide to become chavs or are raised to become chavs by chavvy parents. They’re rude, aggressive, anti social, in trouble with the law, poorly educated because they can’t be bothered to attend school, on benefits or can’t hold down jobs for very long, drink heavily etc. I was born into a very working class family and grew up in a very working class area as was my partner and I still identify as working class despite being a professional, but I am not chavvy at all. I don’t want my child to be assumed to be because of their name and because their parents are from a certain area and have that accent etc. It’s sad, but classism is rife in the UK and it’s been hard for me to overcome it to get where I am today, so I don’t want to make it harder for my child. 

Post # 109
Member
311 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

I couldn’t care less what people think of our daughter’s name, we love it and I hope she grows to like it when she’s older. It’s an unusual name but it’s not hard to pronounce and also sounds classic at once, and we’ve loved it for years due to its significance. We definitely waited until she was born to announce her name as I didnt want any unwanted opinions/ philosophizing on the name we picked. Once we announced, everyone suddenly loved it and it became about her rather than the name itself. 

Post # 110
Member
642 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

I am jumping in this conversation late but Dax also stand for Deutscher Aktienindex (something like the Dow Jones) and in at least three languages it means badger (pronounced exactly the same but spelled differently though). 

So in Northern Europe my name is considered a strong, proper old school name maybe comparable with Alexandra or Kathryn. But when I moved to the US I quickly learned that my name here would be consider what you describe as “bogan”. People are astonished when they see me walking in when they – well – expected “less”. I notice also that people are less friendly, considered or helpful on the phone when I use my given name instead my nickname – which I go by. In my case they also mispronounce -Americanize- it and always spell it in all kinds of ways. This is new to me! It makes me feel horrible and I keep on tossing the idea around to legally change my name to my nickname. 

So I am strongly against names that single a person out or have a stigma to them. You need to consider what’s best for the child. There are certainly unique names that are cute and special but always take into account that not you but the child will have to suffer the consequences if the name is odd-ish. 

Oh and I don’t really have an opinion on your chosen name (Dax) as I have no idea how it “sounds” in Australia (like my name is a good name in Europe but a bad one in the US)

Post # 111
Member
9737 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: City, State

Kinda sorta. I wouldn’t have picked my daughters name if left to my own devices but my husband had been dreaming of using the name since he was like 13 years old so using it was my way of doing something I knew would mean a lot to him and helping him feel connected to our daughter while I was pregnant (I mean he felt connected, but it’s different when you’re growing something in your body). 

I did go back and fourth on the name a little just because we both hate the nickname that comes with it and we knew everyone would instantly nickname her. My husband said we would just correct them and tell them it’s Fullname not Nickname. And as I suspected I have to correct everyone I introduce her to which is annoying. Idk what we’ll do if she gets older and decides she actually likes the nickname – I probably wouldn’t ever call her that just out of protest. 😉 

If it had been up to me she would have had something a lot more unique. 

Post # 112
Member
9042 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I am really surprised this thread is still going. I grew up in the western suburbs so ground zero for bogans. I don’t think Dax is a bogan name, though I think Dax Sheperd would be considered a bit of a bogan, but I do think it has the potential to become one. However, I think you underestimate the usage of dacks on the Australian school playground. I actually heard it today in reference to underwear.

Post # 114
Member
1159 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2019 - Tacoma, WA

I do think that what other people think of a name is important, generally speaking. There are some names that have certain connotations to them or immediately make people think of a certain stereotype, for example.

As an adult, I legally changed my name for that very reason. It was hard to be taken seriously in my career with my birth name. The name I was given immediately made people think of the ditzy blonde cheerleader type, and not the serious writer, editor, and marketing professional that I am. I can’t prove that people passed over my resume because of my name before I changed it, but I can say I had zero trouble getting callbacks for interviews once I changed it, and hardly got any before unless it was for a receptionist or secretary type position.

To me, Dax sounds like a solid name, but I’m a US Bee, so don’t really know how that translates in other parts of the world. If it evokes negative images in people’s mind, I might rethink it.

Post # 116
Member
109 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

Brickette :  Oh no haha I’m sorry I must have missed that sealed I just imagined a kid screaming “oi Daxy” so it’s all contextual! 

Post # 118
Member
358 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2018

Brickette :  Aussie bee here.

Yes, I care what other people think of the names I like for future children.  As a somewhat bogan person myself, I am partial to bogan names, however I wouldn’t chose to put that on my child.   My name picks are traditional, with the option to shorten/nickname.   

My theory is, I’ve known people with traditional names who have been a little out there – and they’ve chosen nicknames/stage names for themselves to reflect that. On the otherhand, I’ve known conservative people who had more unique names, and hated them. For some reason it’s not as easy to bestow a boring nickname on yourself. 

Dax sounds like a dogs name to me, or like pants as in tracky dacks.  

 

Post # 119
Member
383 posts
Helper bee

I sure hope Dax is an acceptable name…!

Post # 120
Member
95 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: August 2018

It is super hard! We’re expecting a girl and I really want to find a name that’s not super common, but also could be pronounced if seen written/people have a pretty good idea of spelling it when heard. My name is neither, and honestly it drives me nuts haha. Both my hubby and I like Aurora (nn Rory) because the Northern Lights are very meaningful to us. However, I know people could easily think “oh, sleeping beauty,” which is soooooooo not us at alllll (never seen the movie, or really any of the Disney princess films) and I am somewhat concerned about that connotation (again, it’s not a negative one, but it’s not the one we’re going for at all)

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors