(Closed) Do you judge people with student loan debt?

posted 7 years ago in College
  • poll: Do you judge people who take out student loans?

    Yes and I have loans

    No and I have loans

    Yes and I don't have loans

    No and I don't have loans

    Other

  • Post # 152
    Member
    1828 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 2014

    I feel like judging somebody with student loans is like judging somebody with a mortgage. You’ve made a large purchase that you couldn’t have afforded without outside money, and by doing so you are investing in your future.

    Judging that is just jealousy, IMO.

    Post # 153
    Member
    2452 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @HonoraryNerd:  I’ve never met anyone who judges other people for having student loan debt. However, I have met people who judge other people for having majors that don’t lend themselves to tangible skills. Or people who don’t go into what are seen as more lucrative fields.

    Post # 154
    Member
    1031 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2015

    I’m of the opinion that unless you were born with someone else’s silver spoon in your mouth or had the good fortune of someone else’s financial sacrifice, you will inherently incur debt for certain things in life; e.g. mortgage, education, automobile…just to name a few. Even the one’s who were fortunate enough to not have to incur student loans, they still got money from someone…just in most cases they don’t have to repay their parents and when they land that dream job they can afford to readily reap the financial benefit versus someone who has to repay their student loans. I bet if the parents had a promissory repayment agreement they would owe a heck of a lot more than what most of us would ever quaify for in student loans.

    Post # 155
    Member
    142 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: January 2014

    I have undergrad and graduate degrees in biological sciences/health/medicine, and I have encountered surprising amounts of judgement for my student loans, mostly from people who had rich parents who paid for their education.  My family and I were recent immigrants who left our adopted country due to economic and political unrest, and did not have tens of thousands saved by the time I went to college. I am a very thrifty person with good credit, and took time off after undergrad to save up money. Whenever people I work with learn that I’m pursuing an advanced degree in our field, they always ask about my student loans as if it’s any of their business. I eventually got sick of sanctimonious eyerolls and judgemental comments that I just started not mentioning schooling altogether.

     

    My then-fiance once started a thread on Reddit asking finance people for tips on how to best approach my student loans as a married couple, and while a few people gave him helpful advice, he also got tons of comments warning him not to marry me and calling my character into question. I’d like to hear any of my patients and coworkers complain about my character! Give me a break.

     

    Post # 156
    Member
    633 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    I’ve seen folks on facebook and possibly WB polling the audience on whether or not to take out a loan and go back to school or keep working, save the money for school, then go back. I have to say, it seems pennywise and pound foolish to save up working at a (presumably) lesser income job to save for who knows how long in order to afford higher education that would get you a higher paying job. It also saps your would-be retirement, the longer you wait to earn “real” money and start planning for the future. Your 20’s go so damn quick!

    Post # 157
    Member
    4045 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: January 2014

    I voted other. It really depends. I admittedly judge some of my friends for their loans because they were unnecessary. They chose to not seek jobs and to live in their own private rooms in very expensive dorms on the very expensive meal plans for multiple years. They could have saved thousands if they hadn’t lived like that, so yeah, I judge. And they are now feeling the pressure of their loans and wish they had done differently.

    But for overall school cost? No. High ed is so expensive that most people need loans. And for the most part it pays off when they get into the careers they desire.

    Post # 158
    Member
    10635 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: January 2011

    View original reply
    @SoNLoveWithHim:  I got money to pay for all of my tuition from scholarships.  I worked to get those.  Did the money come from someone else?  Sure, but then so does the income that people use to pay back their loans.

    Post # 159
    Member
    1031 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2015

    View original reply
    @AB Bride:  I know you had to work very hard for them…that’s worthy of a praise within itself.  Scholarships are exempt from my comment because no one just  gave them to you; as you stated, you had to work and earn them. My Fiance recently enrolled at a State College n will be a looking into scholarships so that he can lessen his loan amount as much as possible because we dont want to be consumed with debt. His earned degree will afford him a better job n the means to  repay his loans

    Post # 160
    Member
    729 posts
    Busy bee

    Why on earth would anyone judge someone for something like that?

    I’m still in college. I went to community college on financial aid for a long time and then took out loans for the state school that I attend now. 

    There’s no effing way I can pay this tuition as I go along just by working, and I work full time. My paychecks are eaten up by rent, utilities, car costs (I live in the woods with no public transit).

    I grew up working class. My parents don’t have any money to pay for my schooling. 

    I either go to college on loans and hope to god I get a better-paying job when I’m done, or I don’t go to college at all and get stuck with the shitty job I have now for the rest of my life. 

    Post # 160
    Member
    1842 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2016

    I’ve worked in higher education for a few years now, and I think it’s vital that the students be financially responsible for at least some aspects, whether that be housing and board, living expenses while in school, a percentage or all of tuition, etc.  Students need to have some “skin in the game.”  Entitlement is a real issue, especially these days, and if a student has no concept of how many thousands their education costs, they don’t always appreciate it.  Of course, there are exceptions, and some students are very appreciative.  Many are not.  I’ve seen students destroy expensive university property and not care at all.  When their parents are informed of the hundred-plus dollar amounts of the charges they don’t mind either.  It’s mindblowing. 

    Plus, with the way tuition costs are skyrocketing, it’s getting almost impossible for parents to be able to pay for everyhing, especially with multiple kids.  Even if I am able to pay for all of it, I plan on covering a portion (maybe housing and board because I’m a huge supporter for the experience of living on campus).  I’ll also make sure they apply for scholarships, and encourage them to get part-time jobs and student loans if necessary.  I was fortunate to qualify for many scholarships, but I still took out loans for books, housing, etc.  Making my loan payments every month makes me understand just how big of a deal getting an education was, and also helps me appreciate the institutions, companies, and individuals who set up scholarships that I could benefit from. 

    Post # 161
    Member
    176 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: dont know

    I have federal loans, they’re all mine.  My parents paid the EFC, which was like 1500 my first year and is now like 700(because for some reason as you age they let you get bigger loans), so basically they paid about a quarter or less.  I bought most of my books with a scholarship and money from work (my job gave me a scholarship) but some semesters they bought my books.  If they could have they would have paid more but I think it worked out fine.  I started out in CC and now go to a state university right next door and commute the whole time.  I do judge people like my cousin though who just HAD to go to an Ivy league/fancy college (he’s gay) in the middle of nowhere in the deep south and then does nothing but complain about how there is no gay night life, how the school is expensive (its out of state and fancy no duh) and how he had to pay everything himself (his parents are divorced so he gets more aid money than I do, he has 3 other siblings who are going to be in college soon and picked an pricy school so of course his dad cant pay the whole thing.) Overall people like that just wanted prestige and not an education and are paying the price for it, even though he is going in a good field, but its not something that he couldn’t have gotten elsewhere for cheaper.  That I do judge, its not the loans its more the “woe is me” crap.

    Post # 162
    Member
    151 posts
    Blushing bee

    I’m cheerfully helping dh pay off his loans. I was always taught that debt for education was “good” debt & I love having a very educated partner. The only things I judge are people who take out a loan and then act disgruntled about having to pay it back (that’s what a loan is..??). And, worse, people that are given a scholarship or money from their parents and then proceed to fail out of school. That makes me think they do not understand the value of money OR education.

    Post # 163
    Member
    1669 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: Disneyland - January 2016

    What a seriously odd thing to judge someone over. I was very fortunate to graduate without having to take out a loan, but I don’t know anyone else, including my two sisters, who can say the same.

    Post # 164
    Member
    5082 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: December 2014

    I’m of the opinion that anyone should be able to get a good education, regardless of whether their parents are rich or not. The school I went to for undergrad cost almost $40k per year. In my field, it does matter what school you go to and what internships that school can offer. I would not be as successful in my field had I gone to my home state school in northern Maine. There just aren’t opportunities there for me to get experience in biotechnology. I went to the school with one of the best internship programs in the country, Northeastern. I got an invaluable education, and an incredible resume, but with it I also got a lot of debt. I was a very high acheiving student and got a big merit scholarship, but that didn’t cover it all. My parents didn’t contribute anything financially to my education, so I took out federal loans for the rest. I also worked my ass off with multiple part time jobs all throughout school to afford my living expenses. 

    I don’t judge people that are pursuing a good career, just because their parents couldn’t or wouldn’t pay for their school. I do judge people that either use their parent’s money or take out massive loans to go to school for something silly or don’t even finish school.

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