(Closed) Do you think it's worth it?

posted 6 years ago in College
Post # 3
Member
3150 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

Well, i don’t think it’s an issue of employers worrying about accreditation. I think if this is what you’re interested in you should go for it. I don’t know the other programs offered, but weigh cost heavily. Sorry that’s probably not much help…

Post # 5
Member
5400 posts
Bee Keeper

What about a program to be a vet tech? Those jobs are probably easier to get than the types you’re looking at and come with more job security. Would that be something you would enjoy?

Post # 6
Member
3625 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

TBH and I hope I don’t offend any Bees, but rarely are these online “universities” ever worth it from an ROI perspective. It’s one thing to take online courses from an accredited B&M university (such as your local public university) but many of these for-profit online universities are not accreditated (meaning the units may not transfer to other schools) and there have been a lot of recent news coverage about how these types of schools swindle money out of students with very little ROI (if any).

Further, most employers do not really look favorably upon degrees and certification from online, for-profit universities. It’s one thing to go to a local vocational school but entirely a different story for online, for-profit universities. Considering the current economy and the competitive job market, it’s easy to overlook the for-profit university candidate for the one that put in his/her four years at a regular state university or an accreditated private.

So it’s worth it if you are looking just to enrich your life and if you just want to say you have a degree in something. However, if you actually want to get a job in the field and be considered seriously, I would recommend going to a reputable junior college or university instead.

“A senator’s examination of for-profit colleges paints them as dropout factories, where billions of dollars are squandered on financial aid and the schools’ emphasis is more on attracting students than educating them. The result, according to the report: Too many students are left with bad debt and no degree.” – USA Today

“Do these colleges deliver on their promises? No, says a growing group of critics, including educators, former students, and the federal Department of Education. They say the schools provide dubious coursework and degrees that don’t lead to good jobs, but do leave students with crushing debt. Most students never complete their degrees. ” – The Week

Post # 7
Member
5400 posts
Bee Keeper

@lilbluebird:  +1, although I think the stigma is changing somewhat. It wouldn’t be what I would chose to do though. 

Post # 8
Member
301 posts
Helper bee

First of all, it’s really great that you found something you are passionate about. I know so many people that are just kind of blah about work, that I think it’s huge that you have narrowed down what you want to do. 

That being said, I do not think that trade schools or online schools are necessarily bad, but they can be very expensive. It is true that in today’s economy, it is becoming increasinly common to have a 4 year college degree. Because of this, employers sometimes prefer someone with a degree over someone without one even if the degree doesn’t apply to the job. It’s doubtful that your employer will check the accreditation of your school if that is what you’re looking for. I’m in an academic field and even then, have only had to send transcripts a few times. One thing to be aware of is that if you do get attend one of these schools, the accreditation may not be recognized by another institution if you decide to transfer, or if you decide you are a school person after all and want to get a graduate degree. 

The one thing that makes me wonder about the program is that it is about working with animals, and you are doing it online. The lab portion is held at a facility in Florida. Do you live in Florida? That could be an expensive trip. All things to consider.

Post # 9
Member
296 posts
Helper bee

I second what @lilbluebird has said. I know of people who have gotten their online degrees and ended up having to go back to their community college and start over from scratch because not only were many employers not honoring their degree, the credits weren’t transferable. This is as recent as six months ago. I also know of employers who automatically throw out degrees/certificates from online schools without even looking at the person’s other attributes/work history.

With that being said, it is completely up to you. I would check out the local community colleges and trade schools (be careful with those also) and see what they have to offer. You don’t want to get a degree in something you love and find out it may not be worth it. I applaud your desire to go back to school and start doing what you love. Best of luck to you.

Post # 11
Member
3276 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

What about an animal science degree from an accredited university? You’re previous credits would most likely transfer and it would be a lot more impressive to employers. 

Post # 12
Member
4495 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I don’t think its worth going to a school that is not accredited. I’m a fed employee that works in investigations and I can’t tell you how many cases I see where people get screwed by going to unaccredited schools.

I would contact some businesses where you would hope to some day be employed and ask them the best way to go about getting into that field – specifically which schools/programs they recommend, what they look for in applicants, etc.

Also, as others have said, online degrees just don’t hold the same weight as traditional education does. If you take a class online here and there thats one thing, but an entire program? Undecided

Post # 13
Member
3625 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@MistySoda:  I would search online and contact local rescues/animal care centers/vet hospitals/zoos and see if people are willing to give you an informational interview. That way, you can actually talk to people working in jobs you are interested in and you can get information on what education/experience they have. That will help you narrow down on what kind of schools/degrees to get rather than just randomly picking a degree program that sounds relevant. I’m not familiar in this industry, but perhaps you may be surprised and you don’t need a degree that is this specialized; perhaps a general animal sciences/zoology degree is enough and any interested employer will provide on-the-job and specialized training. As long as you remember this in an informational interview (i.e. do not make it sound like you really are scheming for a job offer), then I think these contacts will be happy to give you some insight into what you need to do and get.

While finances are not an issue, I would hate to see you waste the money that your parents set aside because the employers that you are interested in do not consider degrees from unaccreditated online programs.

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