Do you tip for Microblading service?

posted 2 weeks ago in The Lounge
Post # 2
Member
200 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2019

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@mariaseeber1212:  I tip my microblader every time. In sf they charge $900, so I don’t tip 20%. But I do give her $100 on top, especially if I like the outcome. If this is your first visit, I would tip $100 (doesn’t need to be 20%). $100 is a lot, especially since her cost is going to be quite low/the same regardless of what she charges upfront. Remember, she’s going to be doing a touch up visit too, so definitely leave her something. 

Post # 3
Member
26 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2012

UK bee here, hoping you can satisfy my curiosity about why you would tip this type of service?

I’ve been to the US a couple of times on vacation and understand tipping in the US as far as restaurant/ hotel/ cleaning employees who work for a company and are likely to get a low wage and therefore rely on tips. 

My experience with beauticians in the UK is that they rent a place in a salon and set their own prices, which cover overheads, etc.

Not meaning to sound judgemental or anything, I am genuinely curious and hoping to avoid a faux pas if I ever go to a salon in the US

Post # 4
Member
1208 posts
Bumble bee

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@rainrocksandroses:  Tipping in the US is just part of the culture. It’s customary in the US (in most states) to tip a person who provides a salon service, like hairstyling, facials, etc. The better the service, the bigger the tip, and 15-20% is standard. I tip my waxing person 20%. I tip my tattoo artist 20%. We also tip doormen and valet parking attendants, coffee barristas, and food delivery workers. A masseuse would receive a tip. My sister receives tips for dog grooming. My fiance tips our maintenance person, and his car detailer. He tips the cable guy. And while we don’t tip our gardner or mailman, they get gifts around the holidays. 

Most beautician employees either make minimum wage, or they rent a space in the salon, and the cost of a booth or chair rental is typically high. Plus they provide their own expensive supplies for the service. I’ve been to states like Oklahoma, where the tip is included in the meal, but never received a beauty-related service, so I’m not sure if that tip is included in the service fee, ot not. 

But to answer your question, beauty services are always tipped. It used to be that you don’t tip the salon owner, but I believe that “rule” doesn’t apply like it used to.

Post # 5
Member
9998 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@bearinabeecostume:  

l don’t think l ever realised the sheer embeddedness of tipping in US culture before reading your post, despite having American friends and watching a truckload of American TV and movies etc.

l have never been to the US but if and when l do l am going to have to be really alert lol. We don’t really do it, except for restaurants and taxis and not even always then , in Australia ….

Post # 6
Member
1208 posts
Bumble bee

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@elderberry:  It definitely adds up! Especially if you’re treating a group of people to dinner and drinks. For example, I took two coworkers to lunch the other day. The bill was $60, but by the time I added the tip, it was over $70. I’m in California, so tax is about 8%. When you factor that with the tip, restaurant dining is quite expensive. 

You can save a bit by getting drinks from the bar, and leaving a dollar or two for the bartender, as opposed to adding it to your dinner bill. Ask to take your own bags to your hotel room, and you won’t have to tip a bellhop. If you Uber, instead of using a taxi, you tip the driver through the app, so you can tip what you want. If you visit a casino to gamble, it’s polite to tip the dealer if you do well. If a cocktail waitress serves you while gambling, a tip is usually customary. For quick services, like ordering take-out food or coffee,  tipping is optional; however most coffee shops and take-out food places keep a jar for tips on the counter. Commercial fast food chains, like Mc Donalds, prohibit tipping.

I assumed tipping for services was standard across the globe until you and rainrocksandroses commented. Now I’m curious to research how tipping for so many services in the US became the norm. 

Post # 7
Member
6401 posts
Bee Keeper

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@bearinabeecostume:  UK here. It’s actually pretty standard to tip here, although less than the USA as everyone here is paid a minimum wage. Standard amounts are roughly:

10-15% at a restaurant

10-15% for a hairdresser/beautician/masseuse (unless they own their own business)

Round up/10% for taxis

You don’t tip at bars unless it’s table service. 

For something as expensive as microblading you would not tip 10%, more like an equivalent in terms of time in comparison to a hairdresser/beautician, eg maybe £10 if it takes an hour.

Post # 8
Member
26 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@bearinabeecostume thank you for the explanation! It is interesting to see the differences in culture.

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@barbie86:  In my city it is not standard to tip except in restaurants or taxis. I dont know anyone who would tip outside of these areas unless they got stellar service.

Post # 9
Member
91 posts
Worker bee

I would tip, but I would probably stick to closer to 15-18% for a service that expensive. 

Post # 10
Member
9998 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@bearinabeecostume:  

linteresting isn’t it? Here in South Australia tipping is absolutely not usual, unless someone did something unusually amazing lol. In fact it could be found a bit affronting, as if the tipper assumed some sort of social superiority to the tippee.

Post # 11
Member
2561 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

In the USA, we definitely have a tip culture. It’s like a “thank you” for someone doing a service for you. Any service to do with personal grooming is tipped. And service type jobs – waiting tables, pumping gas, etc. will often be tipped. I tip the dog groomer, food delivery person, waiter/waitress, hair stylist, nail gal, eyelash gal, car detailer, etc. 

I guess the only people I don’t regularly tip are fast food workers and cashiers.

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