(Closed) Does fertility really "drop" after 35?

posted 5 years ago in TTC
Post # 46
Member
60 posts
Worker bee

elleodee1:  given their location, it would be pretty amazing if they literally dried out. Source seems dubious.

Post # 47
Member
7977 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

The only thing I would say is this: don’t assume that you’re going to be one of those couples who just gets pregnant really easily. One in seven couples have difficulty conceiving, and doctors will often refuse to do tests on you until you have been TTC for a year. Your potential problem is that you could start TTC at 35, start infertility testing at 36, spend a year having tests to find the problem, and then at 37 you could be looking at a lengthy and expensive series of fertility treatments, some of which have cut off dates for your age. For example, many clinics will not give women over 40 IVF… that only gives our imaginary 37 year old three years to get on the waiting list and get pregnant. In my area, the waiting lists for (NHS) IVF can be in excess of two years long, so that’s pretty tight.

TTC earlier just gives you a bit of wiggle room if the worst does happen and you are one of those 1 in 7 couples…

Fknpug:  Is correct. The data on fertility comes from live birth rates, and is still based heavily on the French data from the 1700s. This is still used because modern women use birth control methods which would skew the data…

Post # 48
Member
7977 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

Oh, and by the way…

I recently read a study which I now can’t find (typical) which compared the % of babies born to women over 40 in the UK during the the 1940s-1950s and today. During the beginning of the century, far more babies were born to women over 40 as a % of the total than today. The main difference is that there are now more first time mothers over 40. The over 40 mothers in the earlier part if the century were usually having second, third, fourth or fifth children etc etc.

Why does that matter?

It matters because once you’ve had a live birth with few complications, you are more likely to be able to have another. This begs the question as to whether the data has been heavily skewed…  Having a first child over 40 means that you haven’t tested the waters… you often have no previous knowledge as to whether you have ever been fertile, even when you were a teenager. Many of these women who struggle as they get older may never have been fertile in the first place. They just didn’t realise it.

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