(Closed) Does it matter if you disclose whether it's a diamond or not? (CLOSED)

posted 6 years ago in Rings
  • poll: Would you tell someone who is likely to judge you that your stone isn't a diamond? (all that apply)
    No, it is none of their business. : (309 votes)
    37 %
    No, if they can't tell, it's not my problem. : (173 votes)
    21 %
    No, because diamonds aren't very special and my affordable,convincing alternative stone proves that. : (55 votes)
    7 %
    No, because my SO feels like he'd be judged if people knew he didn't get me a diamond. : (49 votes)
    6 %
    Yes, because I am proud of my stone and I think it's better than a diamond. : (58 votes)
    7 %
    Yes, because I feel clever having gotten an equally gorgeous ring for thousands less. : (46 votes)
    6 %
    Yes, because I want people to see that you don't have to spend more to have a great ring. : (57 votes)
    7 %
    Yes, because I don't care about the hype over diamonds and the judgment of non-diamond erings. : (85 votes)
    10 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    6015 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: March 2012

    It’s none of their business. 

    Post # 5
    Member
    1583 posts
    Bumble bee

    @bunnyharriet:  I say if you are proud of your ring, tell the world. If you are embarrassed then, of course, keep it a secret.

    Post # 7
    Member
    5220 posts
    Bee Keeper

    I think The Bee gives women an outlet to discuss all day, every day… the specs of a ring & in the real world,  no one cares. 

    Tell if you feel like it and don’t tell if you don’t… 99.99%  of the time, no one will ask you.

    Post # 8
    Member
    203 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2014

    I don’t think it’s anyone’s business unless you want to tell them.  I also think it’s tacky for someone to ask if its a diamond or not.   

    Post # 9
    Member
    1583 posts
    Bumble bee

    @bunnyharriet:  diamonds became “the” material through a sucessful ad campaigne. I want a ruby but if we could only afford a garnet I would love it and tell everyone; that is how you change minds.

    Like I said if you are embarrasse that you couldn’t afford a diamond then it is perfectly reasonable to lie when asked. If you are proud of what your SO (or you) bought then tell people. You might inspire someone else to go for your stone too! lies won’t fix our diamond industry they simply bolster it.

    Post # 10
    Member
    1659 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    I complimented a coworker’s ring a few years ago and she said “thanks! It’s moissanite, not a diamond” and explained to me what moissanite was. I assume that she didn’t want me to think she had a diamond, which is what I thought the point of owning moissanite was until I saw all these threads about passing it off as a diamond.

    I can easily distinguish moissanite from diamond, and while I don’t think I would directly ask if someone’s stone was a diamond or moissanite, I would consider someone to be dishonest if they represented their stone as a diamond if it was not a diamond. 

    In college, I had a high quality replica of a fendi spy bag. I assumed that if someone was asking if it was real, they already knew that it wasn’t so I never told anyone that it was fendi. If I had a non-diamond stone and someone asked if it was diamond, I would assume that they could already tell that it wasn’t and I wouldn’t want to come off as a liar by saying yes.

    Post # 11
    Member
    282 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2013

    @bunnyharriet:  I feel the exact same way. I live in the south and everyone is so traditional they don’t think it’s an e-ring UNLESS it’s a diamond. It ittitates me to no end. I don’t care if he proposed with a walmart ring I would have said yes either way. He proposed with a CZ ring because he didnt want to wait till he had the money and we are buying a moissanite for the same reason. I would never let him spend 8000 dollars like that when I know I can get basically the same thing for 1000. Also i would hate to have a tiny diamond and secretly wish it was bigger my whole life. And people do wonder how he could afford an “8000 dollar ring” but he sells cars so its totally plausible. 

    Post # 13
    Member
    1102 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    It really is no ones business, however, it would be wrong to mislead people into thinking you have a diamond.

    Post # 14
    Member
    4311 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    For the love of God.

    Post # 16
    Member
    1381 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2013

    The only trouble I see that could start is when ladies claim to love the story behind moissanites, that they prefer a moissanite over a diamond any day, that they’re proud of their moissanites.. but when asked if their rings are diamonds, say yes?  It’s contradicting.

    If you’re proud of your ring and the history behind the stone, there’s no need to not be upfront with what it really is.  People really shouldn’t be asking if a stone is diamond anyway – it’s incredibly rude.

    The topic ‘Does it matter if you disclose whether it's a diamond or not? (CLOSED)’ is closed to new replies.

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