Does strong fluorescence = diamond cloudiness?

posted 1 month ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
48 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2021

Not necessarily. I think only a small percentage of “strong flouresence” diamonds are cloudy. Most of the time, it’s a great way to save some money and get a bigger diamond! It’s always important to inspect the diamond in different lights before buying. I’ve also read that it can make lower color diamonds appear to be a higher color because the blue in light negates the yellow. I can’t follow any of the links you posted but would suggest inspecting in person before buying. 

Post # 3
Member
4657 posts
Honey bee

View original reply
@solitairelover:  I’ve also read that it can make lower color diamonds appear to be a higher color because the blue in light negates the yellow.

This. My first e-ring had flourescence and I think it was an H, but looked like a higher graded color because of it.  

 

Post # 4
Member
7866 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

Diamonds with blue fluorescence used to be highly sought after. Generally speaking, it is very rare for fluorescence in diamonds to cause cloudiness. Indeed, it is rare enough that there are collectors of such stones. Even strong blue usually won’t cause it, and as PP mentioned, it can make a lower color stone look whiter.

Always view a stone in person in all kinds of light before you decide on a stone, but fluorescence shouldn’t make you categorically reject stones that have it.

Post # 5
Member
4929 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

View original reply
@MrsBtoBe14:  I have a ring I purchased off of ebay a few years ago for less than $200 Australian. It was a piece that still had the original tags attached and was being sold on consignment. It was a cluster that I liked the design of because I’d never seen any ring set like that before or since. A few of the diamonds in the main cluster looked milky in sunlight when I received it but I didn’t care because it was a very inexpensive ring. I honestly didn’t think much of it at the time until I was playing around with a leftover toy spy pen with a blue light that Id brought in a pack for nephews. I shone it on my ring and saw the fluorescence in my diamonds. The milkiest diamonds where actually the ones that had the sttongest fluorescence and were a very strong blue with the blue light shone on it. I had a few other florescent diamonds in the ring that didn’t shine as strong a blue and weren’t milky in direct sunlight. From what I understand, a super strong blue fluorescence plus a near colorless (DEF grade) will be more likely to create cloudiness/haziness/milkiness in a diamond that will be extremely visible in direct sunlight. If you want to be safe if buying a diamond sight unseen, you might be better off buying a medium-slightly fluorescent diamond in a higher colour grade DEF or going for a lower color grade diamond with a strong fluorescence to help make it appear whiter. By being mindful of that, you are more likely to end up with a fluorescent diamond that doesn’t appear milky to the naked eye. The diamonds in my ring according to the evaluation are graded as DEF color with SI2 clarity which probably makes sense as to why the two super strong blue fluorescent diamonds appear milky in direct sunlight. For the price I paid I was surprised when I received it to see that the listing wasn’t lying and they likely were truly in the colorless grade because they were extensively white in appearance. 

Honestly though, I didn’t purposely buy a ring with fluorescent diamonds but seeing it in my ring makes me appreciate how cool it actually is and I can totally understand why they used to be sought after. They are pretty cool but if it’s a huge investment or sentimental piece for you then I can see why you are curious about the stone you have your eye on. Your link doesn’t work so maybe if you post stats or repost the link,  other more knowledgeable diamond bees might be able to offer you some better and more accurate advice. Really though, you should see a diamond in person before you commit to buying especially if you spending big money on it. My ring was a cheapie obviously so I wasn’t too fussed but if I was dropping huge dosh on a fluorescent diamond or any diamond  really then I’d want see it, before committing. 

  • This reply was modified 1 month ago by cmsgirl.
Post # 6
Member
4929 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Posting an old pic of my ring under blue light so you cqn see what I’m talking about. My centre stone in the cluster is the really super milky one and is the one that glows the strongest blue fluorescence. The one directly above it is slightly less fluorescent and slightly less milky. It’s still very fluorescent but in this pic it doesn’t show as much blue because of the position of the small spy pen I was using wasn’t directly over it. 

Post # 8
Member
713 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

It’s always wise to see diamond with strong fluo under many lights. This cannot be read by cert only.

Mine is an L with strong fluo and sparkles wonderfully!

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