(Closed) Does this seem, um, “sleezy” to anyone else?

posted 9 years ago in Military
Post # 61
Member
2394 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

@ejs4y8:  Yes.  Marriage to a USC entitles a foreign-born spouse to file for conditional permanent resident status.  He or she will receive a permanent resident card valid for two years, rather than the usual ten.  After two years, assuming the couple are still married, the spouse files a separate application for removal of conditions and is granted a regular permanent resident card.

For the first two years, termination of the marriage means the spouse loses permanent resident status.  After that, he or she keeps it.

Post # 62
Member
14181 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Two years, that’s it?!?!?! Geesh

Post # 63
Member
2394 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

@ejs4y8:  Keep in mind that both applications can require that the couple appear for an in person interview, and involve submitting a boat load of documentation as evidence of the validity of their relationship.

It’s not like you just fill out a form and the USCIS says, “Oh.  Cool.”

Post # 64
Member
979 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

When I was in the Army people were doing it all the time.  I even got asked to marry for the money.  The only thing I could think of was what if I met someone I really wanted to be with and divorcing that other person would be a pain in the ass.  It is shady and I read sometime ago that they were starting to crack down on it.  Double dipping is just like stealing if you ask me.

Post # 65
Member
1391 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@artichokey: No matter how pretty a picture you try to paint for the situation, the bottom line is that it is FRAUD.

 Reporting them and possibly sending them to prison when the OP not only does not have conclusive proof of fraud is reprehensible

Putting someone else’s bad decision on the OP is silly. The OP didn’t tell them “Hey get married, problem solved you get your card and extra money from the military cha-ching!” However I do see it as the OP’s responsibility to talk to her friend’s of the people doing this and warn them the severity of it. 

And as far as your friends that kept getting pregnant to not have to go overseas, I think it’s really crappy of someone to sign up to serve the military and then find ways to back out of it without looking bad. But that’s just me. I see it as a lousy situation but close to impossible to prove they were getting pregnant for that reason.

@cincity75: Interesting, that would suck to meet someone you really want to be married but have to deal with “divorcing” your business partner. IMO stealing is stealing, no matter how you put it.

Post # 66
Member
1391 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@lezlers:I’d also like to know what their living situation would be? I am sure it would be a pretty important piece of the puzzle in “proving” their marriage. Wouldn’t you think a military man marrying someone who just so happens to need a card merits extra attention? 

Post # 67
Member
2394 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

@missfireslayer:  Not usually.  If anything, people in the military face less scrutiny because, well, it’s the military.  Sort of the reverse of what you’re saying.  No one wants to be the guy who tells someone who served that s/he can’t be with his or her spouse.  That, and it’s not too terribly uncommon for people serving overseas (think Germany, South Korea, etc.) to meet someone and fall in lurve, so it doesn’t really raise flags.

Post # 68
Member
1393 posts
Bumble bee

@missfireslayer: I’m not painting a pretty picture. I’m simply saying that no one should assume to know the facts of anyone else’s relationship. It is entirely possible that their marriage is NOT fraud. In which case, it would be a really terrible thing for anyone to report them. You are assuming that they are marrying strictly for the green card and the money based on a third-party conversation. I’m just saying, maybe that’s not the reason/driving factor….and who’s really qualified to decide that? The government seems to think it is and although I disagree, if that’s the case, I leave it up to them. I don’t need to decipher anyone else’s relationship.

I agree, getting pregnant while on active duty seems pretty shady. But I also agree that I don’t think you can prove intent or punish someone for it. Again, trying to decipher someone else’s motives for a personal decision is a slippery slope.

Post # 69
Member
1391 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@teaadntoast: then something like this happens years later :/ which is obviously a MUCH bigger ring than this situation, but still interesting to read.

http://www.wavy.com/dpp/military/17-indicted-in-Navy-marriage-fraud-case

http://www.midweek.com/content/military_star_news/news_article/veterans_face_sentencing_on_marriage_fraud/

@artichokey: I understand where you are coming from with saying it is hard for anyone but the two people involved in the “marriage” to really say if something is fraud or not. BUT given the information the OP got which is, being set up, never met and barely talking on FB or phone calls? Sounds fraudulent to me. I guess it’s lucky for these people they don’t know me right? 🙂

 

Anyways, thanks for your posts it has offered a different POV I wasn’t really seeing before, but I still stand by what I said. I think it is taking advantage of services meant to help people who need it. And trying to cheat or con the system isn’t okay in my book. And that’s okay if our “books” are different. In that second article it says it cost the government $200,000 for those marriages. That is A LOT of money IMO 

Post # 70
Member
1893 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@missfireslayer:  I ask because if they’re living together as a married couple, it’s not fraud.  Their family stipend is being used to support the people living together as a family under one roof.  The only difference between them and a “legit” couple is being in love, which is not a requirement for legal marriage.

Post # 71
Member
1893 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@missfireslayer: Actually, in the grand scheme of what the military spends, $200,000 is the equivilent of $2.00, if that.  I’m sure they spend more than that on their “investigations.”

Post # 72
Member
2373 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

Military benefits for married people aren’t “double” what single military people earn. Service men and women with a dependent (husband, child, wife, etc) get 200-300 more dollars on BAH (basic housing allowance) and if they are deployed for over 30 days Family Separation Pay (150/month). The maximum “extra” money he will get is 4-500 bucks a month- Is that a lot of money? Yes. But instead of supporting a household of one there is now two. Utilities go up, food bill, transporation, etc.. She’s going to be spending more of his money.

He may be saying benefits are double  if he’s under the paygrade of E-5. If he’s married  he can move off base and collect BAH. However, he is then going to have to pay rent, utilities, insurance, vehicle, etc.. BAH rarely covers everything.

 Being married isn’t a huge monetary benefit. The only real benefit she is reaping is the green card and cheap health insurance. Take solace in the fact it’s not as great as it sounds- your friend is buying into a fantasy.

.. Another benefit is when they divorce they legal advice will be free 🙂

 

Post # 73
Member
507 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I’m coming in a bit late to the conversation, but I’m another person with a minority POV that wouldn’t rush to report them.

Am I a fan of scheming to work the system? No, but I get more aggravated with the super-rich who squirrel their money away in off-shore accounts or use other tax loopholes to shirk their legal tax responsibilities. In the grand scheme of things, the perks that this couple are hoping to get are a drop in the bucket compared to that.

Furthermore, even if they go through with a marriage of convenience, they’ll both still be working and earning wages and paying taxes, etc. Send them to jail, and it’s OUR tax dollars that will support them sitting around in a cell. I’d rather their cells be kept available for violent criminals and the like, not two people who married for convenience. I don’t think the punishment fits the crime, personally.

Post # 74
Member
1893 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@tarheelgrad98:  Excellent point.  It’s all about perspective.  The world is not black and white.  The sooner people begin to realize this, the better. 

Post # 75
Member
2906 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

So shady.

 

I wish I could say I’d never heard of anyone doing this before (in the US–this is the first time I’ve heard of it in the UK but I’m not from there).

The topic ‘Does this seem, um, “sleezy” to anyone else?’ is closed to new replies.

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