(Closed) Does your home have a small master bedroom? (and rooms in general)

posted 3 years ago in Home
Post # 61
Member
1740 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

 

bellanotte11:  This HUD website describes the differences between a manufactured / mobile home and a modular home (which HUD considers stick-buillt).  http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/ramh/mhs/faq.  Please know that getting financing for a manufactured / mobile home can be more challenging than for a stick-built home, and the insurance coverage is completely different as well.

Post # 62
Member
1580 posts
Bumble bee

The brother I mentioned, purhcased his mobile home in San Luis Obispo!  So, I don’t know the market on the central coast too well, since we now live north of Seattle.  But we purchased our home in Dec for 400k, and we looked at some houses in Paso Robles and there were many 300-400k and we were suprised because we thought everything was going to be in the millions.  Have you gotten the same response from more than one realtor?

 

Post # 63
Member
733 posts
Busy bee

Sometimes you have to start at the bottom. It sucks, but most people just starting out live in crappy homes in bad neighborhoods. Get an alarm system and a dog, and you’ll be fine. You’ll also probably find that a lot of people in these “bad” neighborhoods have a lot of pride in their community and think the stigma is ridiculous. I’m not just talking here, we lived in a dangerous city in a gang neighborhood. It wasn’t so bad. There was some petty crime we had to deal with, but it really wasn’t that bad. As time goes by, and you start making more money, you can move up in to better homes and better neighborhoods.

Don’t worry about the home’s value if you knock out a wall. If, when you go to sell, your realtor says it makes the house worth less, then just put it back up. Framing in a wall isn’t hard. I think you are overthinking this. As for small houses, I know a family with 4 kids living in a 2 bedroom 1200 sq foot home. It’s what they can afford, and they’re making the best of it.

Lastly, sure Kansas looks good from a housing price standpoint, but their state government has run the state in to the ground. They may not even have public schools next year. We’ve moved a lot, and in general cheaper places to live are cheaper for a reason. If your jobs can transfer, and if you are flexible about weather, attractions and so on, maybe moving to the midwest or south would be good for you. But do a lot of reasearch before you go. I have friends who recently left what I would consider a better place to live to buy a farm in upstate Maine. I thought it was a horrible idea, but you know, they love it. You just have to find the right place for you. It sounds like California might not be what you are looking for. But don’t just choose based on housing prices, there are other things that matter as well.

Post # 64
Member
1580 posts
Bumble bee

MelissainNC:  I agree.  Based on the picture, it looks just like my brother’s mobile home, in a mobile home park, on the Central Coast.  Some in the park look like RVs and some were on foundations like my brothers, but it still felt different when you were walking around.  Not solid. 

Post # 65
Member
3114 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2016 - Surfer\'s Beach, Grand Cayman

Our home was built around 1890, even though it has been remodeled, the rooms are pretty tiny but we like it just the same. I’m not a fan of huge homes in general though. We live in a “rough” area as well, which we had to do to be able to afford anything. Like another PP said get a home security system and you’re generally fine, we’ve never had an issue. 

Post # 66
Member
301 posts
Helper bee

I’m from the UK so I think our houses are typically smaller than the US. We LOVED our tiny apartment but wanted to have children in the future so thought a house would be better.

As far as I was concerned, if I was leaving my gorgeous apartment I wanted the space to make up for it. We wanted to buy in a good area (close to shops, top grades schools & easy train links to London for work) which meant our budget didn’t stretch far. I also wasn’t prepared to give up my dreams of having huge bay windows and a real fireplace. So that meant to get everything I wanted (area, size, features) we had to buy something that needed renovation.

The square footage of our house is HUGE and it has lots of potential. One day it will be my dream house, but for now I’m having to compromise by living in its current state. For me, size, area and features were more important and I’d rather wait than compromise on these things since I plan to be in the house 10+ years.

 

  • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by  happytobemrsg.
Post # 71
Member
881 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2006

bellanotte11:  

Oh, that makes a lot of sense. You don’t want to add daily pain to your life by climbing stairs. 

Condos here are apartments so my mistake for assuming they are the same where you live. 

Glad you came to a resolution. 

Post # 72
Member
346 posts
Helper bee

I can offer my perspective about living w/ small rooms. My Fiance close on a stacked condo soon (two level townhouse style condo) and we love everything about it except for the small master bedroom and smaller master bathroom. These weren’t huge issues for us as we spend most of our time in the living area and we aren’t ever lounging in the bedroom; our entire first floor is living space. We’ve lived in apts with huge living areas and tiny bedrooms or tiny bedrooms and huge living rooms (our current apartment’s bedroom is larger than our living area) it’s a pain! While we love the space in the bedroom we dont use it. Our guests generally arent in the bedroom, we never eat in the bedroom etc. We were willing to sacrifice the smaller bedrooms in exchange for a larger living area. Hope this helps.

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