(Closed) Dog biting himself raw/bloody :(

posted 4 years ago in Pets
Post # 46
Member
523 posts
Busy bee

gatsbybride2016:  she currently eats Wellness Simple. We tried a few other brands but they were too rich and caused GI upset 

Post # 47
Member
28 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2016

Another licensed vet tech here.. I agree with PP – it is likely a hot spot. You’ve gotten some good advice so far (shaving the area if possible, do not apply bandages or ointments, etc.). The key is keeping the area clean and dry. Also, keep in mind that flea preventatives do not acutally prevent fleas from biting your pets – they are designed to prevent the fleas from completing their lifecycle and reproducing. Some animals are severely allergic to fleas and just one single bite can send them into a frenzy. If you’ve been previously directed by your veterinarian on benadryl dosing, this is certainly an appropriate treatment for the time being (though how much benadryl actually works is up for debate and depends on the pet). Good luck! Make sure your update us after you’ve visited your vet!

Post # 49
Member
95 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

My dog has had issues in the past with licking similar type of hot spots on his feet (each in turn). My vet eventually diagnosed him with allergies. Whenever there are allergens in the air, he gets itchy and picks a foot to lick until it’s an open wound — he can do it in the course of a few hours while I’m out of the house! 

The vet has given me allergy meds for him to take. I also tend to give him benadryl (he likes the cherry children’s flavor meltable tablets) when I notice that I’m having allergies, because he will also probably be suffering soon. I’ve also been given a prescription numbing cream to put on the spots so they don’t bother him and cause him to lick more. The combo has really helped! 

Post # 50
Member
28 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2016

gatsbybride2016:  Avoid applying ointments, even neosporin. I know it helps to heal cuts and other skin wounds; however, the key to helping to treat hot spots is to essentially let them dry out. Think of the last time you placed neosporin on a cut and then placed a band-aid.. when you removed that bandaid, the area was moist.. right? It’s actually the ointment that’s helping to keep in that moisture, not so much the bandaid. So: 1) shave the entire area – 1″ margins around the wound – if possible, 2) clean with solution of mild soapy water and rinse well, 3) pat the area dry, 4) prevent your pup from bothering that area as best as you can. 

Here’s a link with some good, basic information about hot spots (acute moist dermatitis): http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2111&aid=447 

  • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by  SimplyRenee. Reason: added link
Post # 50
Member
659 posts
Busy bee

My dog used to have really bad allergies that developed over time. We tried meds, isolating her, and changing her diet to several different “natural,” few ingredient, grain free brands. Stopping fish oil helped but didn’t make it completely go away (apprently she developed allergies to her favorite animal). What final stopped it was us not feeding her Any dog food at all. We cook for her now (we’re spoiling her because she’s dying) and she doesn’t itch at all. Which just goes to show you that the ingredients list of dog foods isn’t necessarily reliable. it could be something unlisted like a preservative or they could be processing grains and rice on the same equipment. 

Ps. I’m not suggesting that you cook for your dog. I know it’s very unreasonable. I’m just saying that finding a good dog food is hard and you never know where allergens may lurk. The fish oil took us forever to find because we just didn’t think a vitamin/supplement could be bad for her. 

  • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by  lurkingvee.
Post # 51
Member
511 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

OP what food do you feed your dog?

Dogs can have food allergies just like humans. Sometimes the brand you use changes the recipe. Are you feeding grain-free? If not I recommend changing to a grain free food or possible a raw diet. 

Post # 52
Member
2775 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Cortisol cream – it might be itching due to allergies & the cream will help with the itch. My Rhodesian Ridgeback used to lick his paws, arms, legs, & underbelly raw…but his was allergies & his thyroid not working properly. So it was different for him. Benedryl can be helpful too.

Post # 53
Member
247 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2016

My parents’ dog used to chew himself, and their vet said it was allergies. They started giving her children’s benedryl. 

Post # 54
Member
32 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: February 2020

gatsbybride2016:  I don’t have much useful information to add because everyone else has been awesome. My older guy used to get hot spots until we switched him off of all poultry. 

The vet had us trim the hair around the hot spots and wash them with a medicated shampoo. She also recommended and omega fatty acid supliment to help with his skin issues. Coconut oil works wonders. 

If you’re concerned about your boys being bored in the crates, you could always throw in a couple of toys that make them think/work. A Kong stuffed with natural peanut butter/cottage cheese/kefir and frozen makes a good long-lasting crate toy. 

I’m impressed that your collie x can handle the typical ivermectin based topical treatments, as many collies are very allergic to ivermectin. 

Good luck with your boy! Hopefully you can keep him as itch free as possible until Monday! 

Post # 55
Member
252 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

gatsbybride2016:  You should consider doggy daycare or teaching him to not be in a crate when you’re away. But ya, inquire with the vet about the sore.

Post # 58
Member
1169 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

mwby2017:  I’m very chill, I didn’t realize that you were speaking to the OP since you put my name on your post.  My mistake.

Post # 59
Member
266 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2017

Op that is a horrible amount of time for a dog to be in a crate, especially a collie mix, if you are out for more than 4/5 hours at a time and they must be crated you need a dog walker or pet sitter to go round and offer a walk/playtime for at least half an hour in the middle of the day. It’s all very well saying they are crated when you work, NY dogs stay home when I work too but a dog walker comes in at 12 every day and walks them for half an hour and they’re a westie and a Shnauzer not collies. 

 

That said my first dog, the westie has allergies and has at times in the past chewed herself raw. Been almost hairless on her paws and bleeding in her ‘armpits’, the answer for her had been regular baths in malaseb shampoo, a few drops of cod liver oil on her food and a strict diet of James well beloved food. It took us a couple of years to get that regime right though. 

Post # 60
Member
604 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013 - Outdoor

gatsbybride2016:  I don’t think it is unfair to crate one dog and not the other when only one has behavior issues that necessitate crating if the crating puts unecessary stress on the well behaved dog. Fair doesn’t mean 100% equal.

The topic ‘Dog biting himself raw/bloody :(’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors