(Closed) Dog chewing on themselves out of boredom – How to stop?

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
322 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I have a dog that does this, but it tends to be only certain times of the year.  It’s tricky because you have to figure out why they’re doing it.  They could have really dry skin right now with the change in seasons, or they could have allergies.  Try not to wash her for a couple of weeks, in case it is dry skin.  Also, put raw egg yolks on her food, not only will she LOVE it, but it really helps the coat.  (so does chicken/turkey skin, but dogs can have allergies with those). 

Best of luck!

EDIT:  If she is chewing out of boredom, try wearing her out in the mornings before you leave – play with her until she’s too tired to play, and that will make her sleep more than be bored. 

Post # 4
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I could be wrong, but this doesn’t sound like boredom to me; have you talked to your vet?

Our older dog used to chew everything (including himself) but it was anxiety-related.  He stopped with age and some confidence-building exercises.  My sister’s dog is also a big chewer (he literally ate the siding off my parents’ house), but he has also gotten better with age.  The strange thing to me about your post is that your dog has been fine for 6 years, and is only now starting this behavior.  That’s why my intial reaction is that he’s not chewing out of boredom.

Post # 6
Member
3601 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 1992

I’ve heard that Kong toys are great for nervous chewers, but I really can’t say from personal experience.

Post # 7
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@AnnieAAA:  Maybe talk to your vet AND a trainer.  Our dog I mentioned above (Louie) has never been on anxiety meds, but we have done a lot of work with him to build his confidence and manage his anxiety.  My understanding is that not all dogs need to be on medication; some respond really well to training, and you can manage their anxiety with just that.  Also, our trainer recommended us getting Louie a companion, and for a long time we didn’t want another dog.  We finally got our second dog (George) about 2.5 years ago, and Louie’s anxiety has gotten much better.  Louie had a problem with us moving as well, but I think the additional training mixed with George’s companionship helped ease the transition for him. 

Of course every dog is different, and what worked for Louie won’t necessarily work for your dog, just thought I’d share our story.  It really doesn’t sound like your dog is boredom chewing to me, but you know, I’m just some random person on the internet, lol.  🙂

Post # 8
Member
1723 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I’m not really sure because I’ve never experienced this but maybe she felt safe in her crate and now she’s outside alone?

Post # 9
Member
92 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

They have some sprays that might help. Our last dog did this and we used a bitter apple spray. We later learned that he was allergic to grass so his paws were bothering him.

Post # 10
Member
513 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

We had a chewer too! She chewed on EVERYTHING and it was definitely separation anxiety. Crating her helped for sure, and we just let her chew on safe things (like frozen knuckle bones, or hollow bones filled with peanut butter and treats) while we weren’t home to let her get it out. Once she realized that when we were gone she got a knuckle bone, she actually liked us being gone! We also make sure to really exercise our dog before we leave the house via the dog park, bike rides, runs.. whatever you can manage to get some energy out. Dogs are routine animals, and so to have the same schedule everyday, even when in the new environment, will help them adjust. Definitely I would talk to your vet though, just in case its something more serious too. 

Post # 11
Member
595 posts
Busy bee

Bring her to the vet to rule out anything medical going on. If nothing medical, I would consider the amount of exercise she gets. How often is she exercised? This may be a lack of stimulation type thing. Also, if all medical causes are ruled out, and she is exercised regularly, I would consider trying an anti-anxiety med. Sometimes dogs need something to take the edge off when they get older, especially during a stressful time, like a move. Talk to your vet, they can tell you about the different meds available. 🙂 

Post # 12
Member
6597 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Is she exercised regularly?

My motto is a tired dog is a good dog. Maybe she has too much pent-up energy and needs to take it out somewhere.

Also, try a kong with peanut butter and kibble frozen on the inside – working for her food will challenge her mind if bored.

Post # 13
Member
10366 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

My advice would be to choose your dog breed more carefully (some need more stimulation to keep from starting behaviors like this). I would also recommend not owning a dog if you have to leave them all by themselves allllll dayyyyy longgg. It’s kind of cruel. You could have a dog sitter come over and play with them, or live closer to work where you could check in on them. If those aren’t options, i’d say – don’t own a dog.

Post # 15
Member
546 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

A tired dog = a happy dog.

Excersise!!!

Post # 16
Member
318 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

I also would definitely discuss this at a vet visit!!  Otherwise a Kong with frozen dog food will keep them entertained for awhile.  There also is a plug-in diffuser and a spray called DAP that helps to calm nervous dogs through phermones.

We her age and breed I would wonder about an allergy- perhaps something at the new house?  You really need to discuss this with her vet.

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