(Closed) Dog park etiquette?

posted 4 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
7430 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

Is your dog fixed? The humping could just be a way that other dogs are trying to show dominance over your dog. I don’t think you should feel bad if other dog owners have to stop their dogs from humping your dog. That’s their responsibility.

I don’t think anyone should bring their dog to a dog park if it attacks another dog. Even if it’s just one particular dog or one time. The dog park is a privilege, not a right.

Post # 3
Member
480 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

Do you think maybe your dog is too young to be in the main area? I would continue going, but go in the smaller area and insist the gate is closed so your puppy can get exercise. No one can tell you to keep the gate open. 

Post # 4
Member
1809 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

1. Humping is totally normal, especially if yours hasn’t been neutered yet. It’s my your job to make sure dogs dont hump him, and if the owner gets annoyed at all the chasing off they can leave and it wasn’t your fault. No reason to not go, it’s just a way of showing dominance and if you actually let them do it, usually that’s the end of it. No big deal.

2. some dogs just don’t mesh, personality wise, just like humans. Idk why but there’s a few that always have issues with my dog and there’s no reason for it. Usually they want her frisbee which she’s protective of so if I see an issue forming, I take the frisbee. If it’s not aggression over a toy, I would try and go to the other side/avoid those dogs as much as possible. If a confrontation does happen, and it’s real aggression, don’t yell. It gets the energy level up and just makes it worse. Call your dog away calmly and really try to read body language of other dogs to head it off before any aggression actually starts. You’ll begin to see the signs. If there’s a true issue you can’t get over with anther aggressive dog then it’s time to confront the owner.

3. If you want him specifically in the small dog area id just close it off Again. That does seem weird to me and totally makes having a separate space irrelevant! 

4. They might just be looking at your new puppy or seeing if they know you. If they chat while you’re in there then I wouldn’t read too much into it. Unless uoir dog is a huge trouble maker with a reputation, then i wouldn’t read too much into it. 🙂 

 

i I go to the dog park a lot, and love it there! It seems like you’re doing everything right. Just let him have fun and play, and don’t be nervous. They can sense if you’re worried and will act on that. You can always tell the new dog parents from the experienced ones. Just relax and have fun! Keep trying.

Post # 5
Member
3541 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

Laur12:  I went to a dog park once, never again. There were irresponsible pet owners there that made me uncomfortable in regards to safety. Our trainer also doesn’t go to them for the same reason. 

Could you do a puppy class instead to get the socialization?  Or find someone else with a dog and have play dates? 

Post # 7
Member
2326 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015 - Ruby Princess

you’re not doing anything wrong.

let’s see, the first situation: dog humping…this is not a sexual activity. It is a dominance activity. Some dogs are especially humpy, or fixate on dominating a certain dog. The humpy dog owner should intervene, if it gets out of hand. The other owner did the right thing in this situation. Keep in mind the other dog might not be neutered, which can make them more prone to dominate other dogs. 

Second case: if a dog is aggressive and not playing, that dog should be removed from the park for the day. Most dogs are gentle with puppies and know they’re not real fluent in dog language. Others may not be down for a bouncy puppy enticing them to play. Its hard to say, since I don’t know what precipitated the aggressive behavior. Dogs always have a reason for going on the attack, something set them off. Read up on dog body language. You can learn to read dogs for signs they are getting ready to deliver a bite. Are you keeping your dog on a leash while you walk in? That can set some dogs off. No idea why, but its a thing.

Third thing: NO, opening the gate that separates big and small dog play areas is not ever cool. That said, dog parks all have their own “culture”. If someone did that in any of the dog parks I’ve been to, the small dog owners would go and close it. Do the other small dog owners seem fine with this? I wouldn’t be. 

A note about dog park people.  They are quirky generally. And can be clique-ish. People go there everyday, and get to know each other. They can be a little unwelcoming at first. If you show up again and again, you’ll get to know some of them, and they will begin to accept you, IF they like your dog. They will probably like your dog, they’re dog people. 

I hope this helps, you’re not doing anything wrong that I can tell. Just always watch your dog. Don’t play on your phone. Pay attention. 

 

Post # 9
Member
2326 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015 - Ruby Princess

I just read your dog isn’t neutered. This can cause problems (not always, but can). I personally don’t like un-altered male dogs coming to the dog park. 

Post # 10
Member
1382 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

Laur12:  If your dog isn’t fixed yet, that would explain the humping and the aggressiveness/lunging. Neutered male dogs can be very bothered by intact dogs. Some dog parks I’ve been to have signs that say that dogs should be neutered and therefore it’s on the unfixed dogs’ owner to keep things calm or leave if it incites aggression, others don’t have that rule. (They also say dogs in heat aren’t allowed.) Its good for puppies to get beat up a little bit at the dog park, prevents dominance and teaches them to be polite and to listen when another dog signals to leave it alone, but if its excessive, it may be best to wait until after he’s neutered.

Post # 12
Member
9580 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2016

– It is on the other owners to train their dogs not to hump. It’s not your fault, unless your dog is in heat.

– Some dogs just don’t mesh. Protect your dog! If the park is big enough, have them play in separate areas. If you are legitimately worried for your dog, stop going—even though you’re not the one in the wrong, it’s not worth risking your dogs life for the principle of the matter.

– Omg. No. Just go and close it again. They have no right to do that! If they somehow have the nerve to complain, stand your ground. They don’t get to decide that people can’t use the small dog area the way it was intended to be used.

– Weird. No idea what they’re doing. Probably just a crowd that really knows each other and are surprised to see a newcomer. Still, usually (at the parks I go to) they’re super nice to newcomers.. especially people with puppies.

Honestly? It sounds like you’re going to a dog park with super rude owners.

Post # 14
Member
9580 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2016

Oh, and a note about golden retrievers… many of them are nice dogs, but that said my pit mix has been attacked a twice at dog parks and one time it was a golden.  (The other time it was a pittie whose owner was obviously there to try and desensitize them… at the expense of any dog that got too close.)  I’m not saying fights–she’s been in a couple tussles (that never broke skin, but still got a little to animated for comfort).. I’m talking she’s skipping along going “YAY PARK AND BALLS” and suddenly from behind/the side a dog has jumped on to her is clamping down with her neck in their jaws.

All that to say… stay vigilant, no matter what breed.  Dog parks are great in some ways, and really terrible in others.  

Post # 15
Member
3541 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

Laur12:  that’s good!  The one we went to was probably too busy for its own good. 

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