(Closed) dog training

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
15 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I have two dogs and have found the best way for me to potty train is to crate train. I crated them or sectioned off a small area when i was not home and when i first got home immediately took them outside. While your home, keep her on a leash and in the same room with you as much as you can so you can watch her and correct her before she has an accident. Finally, the best thing I found was to take them out often! every hour to 2 hours while your home. hope this helps!

Post # 4
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I feel like you are telling the story of my life!  

We also got a dog who was outdoors twenty four seven, and had the abuses of pregnancy, worms, etc……and who also had carpet confusion. 

Not sure if this would be practical for you but:

We just trained her not to enter the carpet area, which is not too hard for us because it is only upstairs.  First we had an extra tall baby gate up for when we were gone and when we’re here just told her no. Now she is trained to never come upstairs. 

We crate her when we’re at work; she loves her crate.

Post # 5
Member
2691 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I just got a puppy, so it’s not exactly the same situation, but we also crate trained and found it really affective.

She is actually bell trained now (she rings a set of bells hanging on the door when she wants to go out) but she still has accidents. I try to stop her if I see her getting ready to go and giving treats when she goes outside was a big help.

Don’t know if that will help, but good luck!

Post # 6
Member
541 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I would crate train her if she’s not already, that thing is a savior! We didn’t have any problems initially with our rescue, but when we moved she decided the whole house was her bathroom, and had a special bond with the spare bedroom. We were already taking her to a trainer, so he told us what he did and swore it worked for puppies in about three days.

We basically had to re-house break her and crate her unless we were taking her outside. If we took her out and she did her business, she got free reign of the house. If she didn’t, she came back and went to her crate until we were ready to take her out again, or if she made a mess in the house while she was out of the crate, she went back in her crate until we were ready to take her out and the whole process started over again.  I took us a weekend, and it sucked having her in the crate so much, but it worked.

I would also get carpet cleaner from the pet store that is specially made for that kind of mess. From what I was told, even when it’s cleaned with the regular stuff, they can still smell it and sniffing sets their gastro system in motion. Good Luck!

Post # 7
Member
279 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Also, my dog trainer told us to not let our dogs out of our sight while they are in the house while we were trying to potty train them. If we were watching tv the dogs were on a leash right next to us. You have to catch the dog in the act for them to understand. So try not letting the pup out of your sight and then take her out every so often and continue praising her when she goes outside. It’s a lot of work but most catch on rather quickly.

Post # 8
Member
2561 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I would try umbilical training if I were you, the idea is to tie the dog to you with a 6 foot leash, then they are forced to be near you, and don’t have a chance to act up. When you can’t have them tied to you, they are put in a crate. It helps, because it doesn’t give them the chance to make a mistake!

Post # 9
Member
418 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I agree that crate training for at night (at least for a while) and when you aren’t there will reduce the accidents that you aren’t there to catch and be a great way to keep your dog safe and your house less damaged. For when you are home, I would try as best as you can to block off the carpeted areas. If this means using large boxes, baby gates, taking up area rugs, doing whatever you can to protect those areas. Keep her with you when you are at home and discipline when you catch her in the act. Even if it means getting a long leash and tethering her to you until the problem is resolved, like a PP mentioned. Basically, keep an eye on her 24/7 as if she were a puppy! This part is really difficult, but it gets better!!

Like another PP mentioned, go outside for potty breaks often… every two hours at least! Especially right after eating times, getting out of the crate, etc..

We also brought our dog outside on a leash only while we were housetraining him, so that we could praise immediately he peed or pooped outside (even just in the back yard), then he always gets a small treat when he comes inside. I also used the word “Potty” a lot when we were outside and before – like “lets go potty!” and repeating the word often as he was relieving himself. Now, he knows the word as his cue and when I say “Potty??” He will run to the door, knowing that is the right place. But those were just a few of the things that worked great for us, every dog is different.  Otherwise, it just takes a lot of patience and repetition.

Good for you for taking on a rescue that not everyone would have!! Enjoy your sweet girl! 🙂

Whew that was long – I’m feeling chatty tonight, I guess!

Post # 10
Member
10 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I have to third the crate training advice – it is incredibly helpful when housetraining.  Also, I know it is hard to constantly watch her, but you really have to.  I would always make sure our dogs were in the same room as me (either by closing doors or using baby gates) – they still tend to follow me to the bathroom because of this :).  And honestly, be patient.  We have two dogs – one is amazingly well trained, we joke that he would let his bladder explode before peeing in the house, but our other dog isn’t.  She prefers to go outside, but doesn’t ask to and will go in the house still (she’s 3).  However, we have her on a good schedule and it helps that our other dog will ask to go out and she will go out with him.  She rarely has an accident anymore and if she does it is usually our fault, or she is sick.  The difference between the two dogs is that my well trained boy was housetrained by me as a puppy, so he really got used to it very young.  Our other dog was given to my fiance as a puppy before we lived together – he worked 10-12 hr days at the time, so unfortunately she was neglected and didn’t get the training she needed right away.  I eventually told him I was taking her to live with me because it wasn’t fair to her to live like that, but the damage had already been done and she just doesn’t have the same understanding as my boy.  It also took a very long time to even get her to this point – at least 3-6 months of constant watching and being aware of where she was in the house.  So, please don’t be discouraged, your dog will figure it out eventually, but you definitely need to be patient and keep an eye on her to prevent those accidents inside the house.  And hopefully she will be better then my girl – my girl’s biggest problem was that she basically learned it was ok to go inside the house and I had to first get her to understand that it wasn’t.  At least you aren’t dealing with that problem as well.  And all that said – although I deny it when my fiance brings it up – my girl really is my favorite, she is special to me and I am so glad I did take the time to train her, it is totally worth it. 🙂

 

Post # 12
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

You’ve gotten some excellent advice.  Just wanted to ask/add a couple things.

Is she sneaking off to potty on the carpet when you are there, or only while you are away?  If you are there, keeping her leashed to you will help.  ALSO, increase the frequency of her trips outside.

When you take her outside to go potty, do you let her off the leash and just allow her to go whever she wants?  If so, keeping her on-leash until she has gone in a specific area of the yard may help, as well.  That way she associates pottying not so much with the texture of the grass or capert, but with a specific area of the yard.

Good luck, and keep us updated!

Post # 15
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

oh no I am so sorry!

That is the exact same gate I have too because, like you, our cat’s food and litter box are in the carpeted areas.  

Those crate experiences sounds sooo terrible.  I’m so sorry that you are going through this.  

 

I would say that this whole situation is totally worthy of contacting an expert. 

Post # 16
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

meds?

The topic ‘dog training’ is closed to new replies.

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