(Closed) Dual-gender names?

posted 9 years ago in Pregnancy
  • poll: What do you think of Dual-Gender names?

    Names are either masculine or feminine - you shouldn't mess with this!

    Some names can be more unique when applied to something other than the traditional gender.

  • Post # 16
    Member
    2231 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    Like a PP mentioned I like typically male names for women but not the other way around, or feminine names with ambiguous nicknames. 

    There’s bound to be confusion even with a name like Alex! If they don’t write out their full name, how could you possibly know?

    Post # 17
    Member
    3771 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: December 1999

    We picked out our name when I pregnant and had a miscarriage. After that my husband said he is set and wants baby #3 if we have to be nname Charlie regardless of the sex. If it is a girl will will do a more femminine formal name and use Charlie as a nickname.I think girls tend to do better with a masculine name, then boys with a feminine name, like a PP said.

    Post # 18
    Member
    2195 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: June 2011

    Love them! I knew a Morgan and Ryan (who were sisters) and they always suited their names. I obviously know several other male Ryans and Morgans and never thought it was more masculine or feminine!

    The only confusing part is, that Ryan (girl) just married another Ryan (guy) so that can be a little awkward. LOL!!

    Post # 19
    Member
    987 posts
    Busy bee

    View original reply
    @PandasWifey:  I don’t know that a gender-specific really clarifies because people tend not to use their middle names on a daily basis; however, it would give the person a gender-specific option if he/she was annoyed with the neutrality of his/her first name.

    Post # 20
    Member
    2140 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    I’m really not a fan of names that can be used for both genders.

    Post # 21
    Member
    68 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    I love that the example being used of a feminine name used on a boy is Ashley.

    Ashley was originally, tradtionally, a boys name. It became known as a girls name because of people using it as a cross gender name, now to the point that people assume it is a feminine name. Same with Lindsey and Allison. So pointing to it as an example of a name that should only be a girl’s name is kind of funny. 

    Names are very gender fluid, depending on generational use. I, personally, really enjoy gender neutral or swapped gender names, but my sisters and I all have very, very girly names. Biblical girly levels of traditional. So I may just be looking at what I don’t have. 

    Post # 22
    Member
    190 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: August 2012

    I have a dual gender name and I love it! My parents wanted something that went both ways for a girl. It’s always a fun conversation starter too.

    I know a girl named Tyler and a boy named Loren and they never had any problems with it either.

    Post # 23
    Member
    2025 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    I’m on the fence with this one. I prefer gender specific names, especially on girls (I like really feminine), but I don’t hate or even strongly dislike when people name thier own kids this way. It’s just not my favorite. I actually love Ashley on a man though. I think it’s a southern thing, and I’ve known a few in my life; all of which have been extremely good looking, manly men who seemed really confident in that name. 

    Post # 24
    Member
    7993 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: October 2010

    I HATE gender neutral names.  My name is Erin, and even though there are definte male and female spellings (Aaron/Erin), I can’t tell you how many times I have been told “oh, I thought you would be a guy”.  I was teased in school because Erin/Aaron is supposedly a guy name.  UGH.  Don’t do this to your child.

    Post # 25
    Member
    190 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: August 2012

    View original reply
    @eeniebeans:  YOu must have gone to one mean school. I have never heard of anyone being teased for a gender neautral name!

    Post # 26
    Member
    9816 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

    I love androgynous names. But my grandmother (who had 5 children) named all her girls names that are commonly associated with men’s names. One year they were listed in the paper local paper for a school event as “The Murphy brothers” ha!

    Post # 27
    Member
    7993 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: October 2010

    Ice Skate Well, I wasn’t fat and didn’t wear glasses, so I guess they had to find something to tease me about 🙂  Kids are mean.

    Post # 28
    Member
    1278 posts
    Bumble bee

    I’m a youth worker, and it can get really confusing sometimes!  Once we assigned a boy into the girls cabin for a camp accidently, (we changed our registration after that to ask for gender!) and I had a coworker who once called a homely looking girl with a gender neutral name a little boy to her face.  It was a horrible experience for the child and the adult felt so bad about it too!  

    It can be unique to have them, but just be prepared for situations like these to come up.

    This thread reminds me of the Johnny Cash song, “A Boy Named Sue”. 

     

    Post # 29
    Member
    1479 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: July 2010

    View original reply
    @ieatunicorns:  If it’s a girl, you could totally name her Charlotte and called her “Charlie” (ala “Gossip Girl” right now). That way, if as an adult she totally hates having a boy name, she’d have a choice to be Charlotte.

    I am personally very against using boy names for girls and girl names for boys.  I personally just don’t think it’s cute. But then, I am also a big fan of very old fashioned names, which were VERY gender specific.

    Post # 30
    Member
    492 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2011

    My name is traditionally female in the US, but male in Europe.  I’ve had passport agents light-heartedly question if I go by my middle name, and had things addressed to Mr. rather than Ms. by accident.  I feel like I have to be explicit about my gender if making arrangements to meet someone in Europe for the first time.  It’s a slight pain and I’m glad I don’t have to deal with it in the US.  So… I’m anti-gender-neutral.  For middle names I have no objection though since that isn’t used alone usually and there isn’t confusion.

     

    The topic ‘Dual-gender names?’ is closed to new replies.

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