(Closed) E-Collar training?

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Personally I am not a big fan of using negative techniques/punishment techniques for training.

Positive training works so well. You can train your dog without punishing it or scaring it that many dogs actually ENJOY. The training becomes fun and interactive for them rather than scary and unwanted.

Take a look at this person’s youtube channel. She only uses positive methods for training (clicker and treats and positive reactions/vocalizations) her dogs and seriously, it is AMAZING what she has done.

http://www.youtube.com/user/kikopup/videos

and here’s an example of her training :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msCmMaYtjpI

It’s called “invisible barriers” and she has trained her dog there are areas it is not allowed to go in.

Post # 4
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I did resort once to using one with a beagle I had.  She would run off and not come back at all.  We did obedience training, refresher training, the whole 9 yards- and if she was’t distracted she was an angel!  A friend of mine who lived in the same area had an incident where her beagle ran off and got picked off by a cyote.  I went THAT DAY and got a collar.  It was one with the beep noises in addition to the shock so I could train her that the noise was a warning instead of just zapping the poor thing.  I only had to shock her ONE TIME.  After that, the beep noise was enough to get her to come back.

Let me reiterate that the e-collar was a last ditch effort, and was necessary in the area I lived in to keep her safe.  I currently have 2 danes & a mutt, and I have never had to resort to anything like that.  If I can’t get their attention by saying their name, I use a whistle or in the house I use a squirt bottle.  I have heard great things about clickers too.  Exhaust your efforts before resorting to anything that causes pain or discomfort.

Post # 7
Member
4352 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

We had an electric fence (not sure if this is the same thing) growing up. One of our dogs got shocked once and never crossed the line again. The other dog got shocked all the time and didnt care. She didn’t sprint across and forget it was there either. It was a slow walk to inspect a tree in the neighbor’s yard. And we had the system where it “warns” the dog with a high pitched noise, and then actually shocks them if they keep walking in that direction. So it might depend on the dog. The dog who didn’t care was pretty stubborn. She was an old lady and just kind of did what she wanted, regardless of the consequences. She usually didn’t do anything too bad though.

Post # 8
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@Mrs. Gremmlin:  no prob!  I do understand that corgis are notoriously distractable & insanely hyper!  Like I said, the one with the beep thingy was nice because it did get her attention.

Post # 10
Member
8394 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I personally would never use one. I have two corgis and visit a few related forums, and I’ve seen multiple dogs end up with huge issues from using an e-collar. I don’t buy the company’s info either…how is ANY sort of electric shock pleasant or a positive experience? I’m sorry, but no.

The neighbor behind me has one on his german shorthair, and believe me that dogs YIPES when he gets shocked. Maybe they have it turned up high, but it’s definitely no “tap on the shoulder”. They do make ones that just vibrate which I think are okay.

Post # 11
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Yeah, I literally CRIED when I shocked my poor beagle.  I had it on the lowest setting, but it still broke my heart.  At the time though, it was either get a little shock or get dragged off & eaten by a coyote, so it was the lesser of two evils.

 

@Mrs. Gremmlin:  If the training is that expensive & your dog doesn’t run off like into traffic or into the woods or anything, then I’d probably check into getting an e-collar that beeps or try using a whistle to get her attention.  Is she out and about off leash regularly? 

Post # 12
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Personally I plan on getting a sight hound and I’ve heard lots of things about how you can’t trust them off leash no matter how trained they are (such as a greyhound who is trained to chase after small game and such – think racing after the fake squirrel at the races)

I plan on training using a clicker and hopefully I can reliably get the dog off leash and listening and consistent but if I can’t I will keep it on leash at all times. I would never want my dog dashing off into the road or such.

If it’s something you feel you need to do to keep your dog safe, and nothing else is working no judgement. We do what we have to do to keep our babies safe.

I just wouldn’t do it personally.

Post # 14
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

My other problem with it is how will the dog know it has done something wrong? From it’s perspective it’s just randomly getting shocked while it’s playing.

Or you call it and it doesn’t respond and gets shocked then it associates being called with shocked? I don’t know.

Post # 16
Member
14 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I have two rescued coonhounds and the only way they can go off leash is with an electric collar. We tried multiple training methods including having a trainer come to our house but coonhounds are very stubborn and will always follow their nose. My experience is similar to DaneLady- it only took one or two small shocks (on the lowest setting) and now all they needs is a beep to remind them. The collar is really helpful in reminding them that they are either going too far, or to simply get their attention. Sometimes I can tell one of them is going to book it and once I give that beep they look back at me and remember to stay. I swear all they need is a reminder! With a coonhound, it is impossible to get their attention when they are immersed in a scent, so yelling, calling their name, saying “come”, has not worked for us in the past. The beep always gets their attention and reminds them that they are on a walk, not a coon hunt! Our dogs our big and need to run around but tend not to so at the dog park so it is important that they can be off leash. I would say try the collar, but make sure you use it in the right way. As you said, it is not supposed to be a punishment. Dogs are smart, mine easily figured out what I was asking them to do when using the collar. I also only use the collar for off leash walks and when I turn it on and it beeps they get super excited. For reference, I did shock myself on a higher level and it was more surprising than anything. I believe some dogs might yelp because they are simply surprised and were not expecting it. Good luck! 

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