(Closed) Ebola Misinformation makes me angry (slight spin off)

posted 5 years ago in Wellness
Post # 31
Member
10651 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

Misswhowedding:  That’s not what I have been hearing at all.  Country reporting difference?

Post # 32
Member
1448 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: City, State

I would just like to remind EVERYONE that proper hand washing techniques can do wonders!

A 2013 study by researchers at Michigan State University states that 95% of people do not wash their hands properly! 95%!

Please, wash your hands. 

Post # 33
Member
5219 posts
Bee Keeper

Misswhowedding:  “A travel history was taken, but it wasn’t communicated to the people who were making the decision. … It was a mistake. They dropped the ball,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/01/health/ebola-us/index.html

 

The patient explained to a nurse last Thursday that he was visiting the U.S. from Africa, but that information was not widely shared, said Dr. Mark Lester, who works for the hospital’s parent company.

Regretfully, that information was not fully communicated” throughout the medical team, Lester said. Instead, the man was diagnosed with a low-risk infection and sent home.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/ebola-case-stokes-concerns-liberians-dallas-25880747

 

Post # 34
Member
7778 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

I find it pathetic that it was the family of the sick man who were the first ones to contact the CDC, not the hospital etc.

Post # 35
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

 

Mrs_Amanda:  THIS. If we’re relying on anyone who comes in contact with the virus to follow strict procedures and then our own hospital staff are forgetting procedures… it makes SENSE why people are nervous. I’m not talking about the tin foil hat people who want to talk conspiracy theory population control crap– I’m talking about scientists and public health officials who are off the record and expressing their concerns. As a nurse, I feel especially strongly about this. Do you know how many times we have tracers done to examine our handwashing protocols and half the time at least one unit gets less than a 70%? THAT is where issues start. And this guy carried a pregnant woman infected with ebola (who later died) to a hospital where she was turned away and then carried her home where she died. Why on earth didn’t he think it was a little absurd to still take his trip to see family here?

The whole “airport scans temps” thing is stupid too. Great– you don’t have a fever then and there but the incubation period is 21 days and it restarts every time you’re in contact with someone else. You could be right on the cusp and by the time you land, symptomatic.

I also want to say that I think people are terrified not necessarily because of transmission but because of fatality associated with the disease. A 70%+ death rate is pretty high…

But yes, the tinfoil hat theories are absurd.

Post # 37
Member
398 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014 - Norton Country Club

CharleighT:  “The whole ‘airport scans temps’ thing is stupid too.”  This is what concerns me.  I have a lower-than-average oral temperature, typically ranging from 96.2 to 96.6 degrees Farenheit.  A slight fever could easily raise my temperature to the typical 98.6 without signaling any issue, but my bodily fluids would still be considered an infection risk. 

OP, I agree- there is a ton of misinformation and hysteria regarding this issue.  It seems that hospitals all over need to find the balance of treatment of symptoms, concern for spread, and the risk of over reacting. 

Post # 38
Member
3682 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

With Ebola having an incubation period of up to 21 days, we shouldn’t be allowing travellers from West Africa in and out of the country right now. Period.

Post # 39
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

 

cmbr:  I totally agree! That just seems like asking for trouble! I’m also irritated with this individual because he KNEW he had direct contact wtih someone who was so sick they died days later. He knew that there was NO way to have been in that close contact with her (without protective gear) and not come down with it. So even if he had no symptoms initially when he boarded the flight, he knew it was coming. Maybe he chose not to disclose his contat with the person because he knew he was going to fall sick and wanted care here as opposed to the hospital he brought the sick woman to that turned her away due to lack of space? I don’t know. But I’m calling FOUL on his decision…

Post # 40
Member
2350 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Fear mongering at its best and a specifically placed distraction from REAL issues in the world. A population who is fearful is easy to control.

Post # 41
Member
3682 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

CharleighT:  I’d be interested to know when that plane ticket was booked. All of the Ebola patients who have been brought to the US and treated with experimental therapies have lived. In Africa, things are so bad that hospitals are turning people away to die on the street. It’s a terrible situation all the way around, and maybe this makes me cynical, but I wonder if he booked his flight to the US after he was directly exposed to Ebola, hoping that the doctors here could cure him.

Post # 43
Member
2837 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

Misswhowedding:  I like your post.  I will ask though– in terms of the bedrail or door knob touching— if an Ebola positive patient is sweating, and touches a door knob, and then thirty seconds later- someone else touches a door knob, is it possible that the non-infected person could, in fact, be infected?  As has been mentioned many times- we look at our hands and think we have no cuts, but we all have microscopic cuts on our hands.  Not hard to believe.  

And one other thing- while it’s been said over and over that this isn’t airborne— the CDC’s definition and mine of “airborne” differ.  If someone can talk- and potentially spit into my eye (a mucous membrane), doesn’t that mean that the virus has traveled through the air- and landed in my eye?  I consider that airborne.  I know it doesn’t linger in the air- but it traveled through the air. We all apit more than we think while we talk.  And grossly- for a perfect example….this morning I was on my computer and I sneezed.  Yeah….that was all over my computer screen and that was WITH me assuming I had covered my mouth and nose adequately.  Gross- I know.  But it’s the perfect example.  Oh- and while sneezing isn’t a typical symptom- it doesn’t mean that someone infected with Ebola can’t sneeze.  I’m not sick- I had a tickle in my nose.  

I’m throwing this out there for conversation- are the things I said correct?  I’m going based off what I think is correct based on things I’ve read from various sources.

Post # 44
Member
10651 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

MrsEME:  What you said about travelling through the air is correct, when you’re using your definition of airborne.  You can say that about many things if you make up your own definition instead of using the established definitions though.

My understanding about skin to skin – unless you can actually see a wound, the doorknob example probably wouldn’t result in transmission.  The skin is one of our defenses, minor open wounds don’t stay open for long, ones that you can’t even see for an even shorter time frame.  The bigger issue would be if someone then immediately rubbed their eyes after touching the door knob.  Viral load likely becomes a factor in that situation as well.

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