(Closed) Ebola Misinformation makes me angry (slight spin off)

posted 5 years ago in Wellness
Post # 106
Member
1211 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

MrsEME:  Can’t there be diseases that were simply “born” airborne?

no. everything is mutating all the time. thats how evolution works. evolution doesn’t work on the micro scale. it works on the macro scale. the reason microorganisms evolve so quickly compared to us is bc they reproduce so darn quickly.

but yes i think its unlikely ebola would become airborne. though it is not impossible.

Post # 107
Member
2837 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

AB Bride:  I was repeating information- which was relevant to another poster’s comment.  I also noted “if I remember correctly”– which I think is a pretty fair– “I am attempting to add to conversation, but I also know that I have no 100% proof that I am 100% correct”.  Admittedly, I’m not a expert on the subject.  

It seems like you’re questioning me because you know the answer- or at least think you know the correct answer.  To me- that’s not someone truly questioning me- it’s calling me out-on something I never claimed to be 100% accurate on.

Like most of people- including the OP of this thread– a lot of is based on what the general public learns from what they’ve read and learned.  The OP isn’t a professional on infectious diseases- but is sharing her feelings, opinons and thoughts based on her heavy interest in the subject.

Post # 109
Member
10651 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

MrsEME:  Sorry, you did post that it was something you thought you saw her.  I have been having 2 online discussions that are related.  The information was still wrong, and I still stand by what I said about asking someone, I should have done it in a less personal way though.  Ie. if that’s what someone stated they are incorrect.  The general public does learn much from what they read, and unfortunately there’s a fair bit out there that’s completely wrong.

Post # 110
Member
1784 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’m taking an infectious diseases and populations class this right now and we are using what we learn in class about tracking patient zero, infection rates, mutations, etc. and applying it to the current outbreak. It, of course, is a scary situation, but it is also incredibly fascinating to be able to apply that knowledge to a situation as it is happening and seeing how important and relevant the field of epidemiology truly is.

Post # 111
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/10/02/352983774/no-seriously-how-contagious-is-ebola

Holy moly! There’s a case of Ebola in the U.S.!

That first reaction was understandable. There’s no question the disease is scary. The World Health Organization now estimates that the virus has killed about 70 percent of people infected in West Africa.

The Ebola case in Dallas is the first one diagnosed outside Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. And the health care system in Texas didn’t quarantine the man right away. He was sick with Ebola — and contagious — for four days before he was admitted to the hospital.

But when you look at health officials responding to the case in Dallas, they seem cool as cucumbers, despite the initial misstep.

“I have no doubt that we will control this importation, or case, of Ebola so that it does not spread widely in this country,” said the director of the CDC, Dr. Tom Frieden.

Why is Frieden so sure this virus won’t spread beyond a handful of cases?

It boils down to something called “R0.”

The reproduction number, or “R nought,” is a mathematical term that tells you how contagious an infectious disease is. Specifically, it’s the number of people who catch the disease from one sick person, on average, in an outbreak.*

Take, for example, measles. The virus is one of the most contagious diseases known to man. It’s R0 sits around 18. That means each person with the measles spreads it to 18 people, on average, when nobody is vaccinated. (When everyone is vaccinated, the R0 drops to essentially zero for measles).

At the other end of the spectrum are viruses like HIV and hepatitis C. Their R0s tend to fall somewhere between 2 and 4. They’re still big problems, but they spread much more slowly than the measles.

And that brings us back to Ebola. Despite its nasty reputation, the virus’s R0 really isn’t that impressive. It typically sits around 1.5 to 2.0.

Even in the current epidemic in West Africa, where the virus has been out of control, each person who has gotten sick has spread Ebola to only about two others, on average.

Why is that?

Many factors contribute to the R0, such as how long you’re infectious** and how many virus particles are needed to make another person sick.

But in Ebola’s case, the mode of transmission probably helps keep its R0 low. Ebola isn’t spread through the air, like the measles or flu. It requires close contact with some bodily fluid, such as blood or vomit, containing the virus.

Now at this point, you’re probably thinking, “OK. But an R0 of 2 is nothing to brush off.” You’re right. R0 of 2 means one person infects two people, who then infect four people, then eight, 16, 32 — the numbers go up fast.

But that isn’t likely to happen in a place with a good public health system, like the U.S. Why? Because people with Ebola aren’t contagious until they show symptoms.

So to stop the chain of transmission, all health workers in Texas have to do is get the people possibly infected by the sick man into isolation before these people show signs of Ebola.

Then R0 drops to zero. And Texas is free of Ebola.

Post # 112
Member
6776 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011 - Boy #1 12/2015, boy #2 02/2018

Misswhowedding:  That’s a good point that you bring, but let’s be reminded that here in the US ebola is a new threat, and the people in Africa have likely gained some sort immunity to it. We need to be concerned not terrified and take all the precautions necessary to avoid getting infectedwith the virus as it can live outisde the body and transfer can occur even when a person is not in direct contact with another peson. Virus are tricky and have many mechanisms to transfer and mutate. One cannot put the guard down when it comes to saving lives. 

Post # 113
Member
6776 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011 - Boy #1 12/2015, boy #2 02/2018

peachacid:  Another good point, the US the first country to get ebola outside Africa. Now the third world country people are going to avoid coming to the US and getting infected.

What does that tell us about our security and health-care systems? If people took this more seriously, I bet the story would be different.

Post # 114
Member
10651 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

candy11:  If you ignore the Phillipines.

Post # 115
Member
2837 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

AB Bride:  I don’t mind being questioned– I like having conversations and discussions about a variety of topics- many of which I’m sure I know only a small amount about.  I like to learn.  And I’m OK with being wrong.  But yeah, I was starting to feel like you were questioning me personally– and I thank you for acknowledging that.  

 

I did find this thread interesting though– the OP is citing facts from things she’s read and researched.  It’s still questionable as to whether or not they are FACTS- unless you simply choose to believe her and her sources.  That said– she may have many accurate facts.  But I asked her how she was so knowledgable on the subject, and she acknowledged that it’s just because of her interest.  

 

I’m pretty sure (though admittedly I don’t think I’ve been able to read every single post on this thread)- that not one person in here is a specialist in the infectious disease area or Ebola, specifically.  Which means this thread is entirely based on opinion of what any of us have read from various sources.  

Post # 116
Member
270 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

What are your thoughts on this now, as the Texas health care worker has been diagnosed with Ebola, and they arrested saying it was an airborne transmission. Pretty scary if you ask me.

Post # 117
Member
7 posts
Newbee

Ladies, I come from and live in Zimbabwe which is the Southern Africa. Please note that Africa is not a country it is a CONTINENT. I have been reading through this board and so many of you equate Ebola to the whole of Africa. Ebola is in West Africa more specifically Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra Leone. Many of you here say ” people in Africa,” or outside Africa or people in Africa have poor sanitation. Please note this not only incorrect but dishearting to hear that some people are insinuating that Africa is unsanitized and is infested with Ebola. Ebola is in specific countries within Africa NOT the whole of Africa. Many countries have many traditions and different traditions when it comes to burial rites. Just because we are Africans doesn’t mean we all have the same traditions and do the same things. Many people have poor hygenie practices others practice good hygenie like myself. We all do not live in villages we are the same as everybody else. we have middle class families and poor families and rich families. We live in houses and drive cars wear clothing. I am tired of the media potraying Africans as poor people who live in the jungle and have lions and monkeys in their back yards. This not only amusing but hurtful. Please people get your facts straight.

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