(Closed) Education regret

posted 8 years ago in College
Post # 17
Member
1748 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

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@peachacid:  What do you mean? I mean, I took all the general education courses and then chose my degree and focused on that.

Post # 18
Member
84 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

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@urchin:  I actually am in admin at a hospital! I absolutely thought my degree was going to be pretty worthless when I graduated college (BA in Psychology) and had no idea what I was going to end up doing. I applied for the position I’m in because they wanted someone with ANY college degree, and it fit that the skills you aquire in college regardless of your major are desired qualifications. 

If you aren’t happy doing what you are doing, just keep looking elsewhere. I would never have even known my position EXISTED when I was in college, let alone that I would qualify for it.

Post # 19
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@caits615:  That’s what I was asking. SO, you do have skills that are not just related to your degree.  But yeah, I think for non-profit management and stuff like that, you really need to go to graduate school.  At least you don’t have undergrad debt to deal with!

Post # 21
Member
322 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I’m right there with you! I got a BA in History. I’m now about 3 classes from a Masters in Public Administration just to have a degree that is relevent. At all. For anything. Laughing

Plus, I transferred schools during my undergrad and am still $11,000 in the hole for the college that I didn’t even graduate from!

 

Post # 22
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@Mrs.LloydDobler:  Unless you absolutely learned NOTHING in undergrad, your degree has relevancy. Especially one in history, where you most likely learned to look at more than one side of an issue, learned to compare sources, and learned to analyze what you’d researched…

Post # 23
Member
2622 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Since you cant go back and change your degree and loans you need to realize what it is doing for you. 

You may have a job now that doesnt require it, but I would be willing to bet you got the job because you were the better qualified candidate because of your degree. If you were up against people of your same age without a degree, your degree was a differentiating factor.

Also, what about future jobs? You will likely need a degree then. I appreciate you would love to be a Stay-At-Home Mom mom, and with only 40K in loans you can do that. But remember, circumstances change and now you have a degree that gives you the ability to earn money. That fact alone is important. If your husband loses his job, cant work, or some other problem where you have to earn money to take care of your children, you can do that a lot easier with a degree and some experience. 

As other have said, identify what you want to do (you said hospital work) and keep at it. If you really want to work at a hospital I would volunteer at one to get to know the people, then when a job opens up they will know you and your work ethic which will give you a heads up over the other candidates.

A degree is often less about what you learned there, especially with liberal art degrees, but the fact that you learned how to learn, how to think critically, how to apply yourself and finish something successfully, how to work cooperatively etc.

Post # 24
Member
7309 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011 - Bed & Breakfast

Just chiming in to offer a bit of hope. I was an English major with dual minors in Womens Studies and Polotical Science. I now work in public policy, specializing in health care issues. I make 6 figures and work on multi-billion dollar programs. I use my degree every single day to research, analyze, write, and present information to a wide variety of audiences. Last week I wrote an education article, and next week I am sitting on a nationwide technical expert panel where I can guarantee that I will be the only one without a long string of letters after my name. And you know what? I can hang with the best of them. 🙂 English is a great degree for any career that requires logic, analysis, and writing skills. It can open doors, so hang in there. You will find something that fits with your skill set.

Post # 25
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@lovekiss:  I think people think, right at first, that unless they’re reading 19th century literature and talking/writing about it, or unless they’re researching an historical even to analyze it, they’re not using their degree.  I always tell people to remember that there is so much more to what they learned than the specifics of their degrees.  

 

Your job sounds so interesting.  I work as a reading specialist and am always finding something else I am interested in, but all related to education…which is lucky for me!  

Post # 26
Member
11324 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

I think there will come a day when you will be grateful for that degree. ANY degree makes it so much easier to get a job than no degree at all. And even though you’re a Stay-At-Home Mom now, you might not be forever. If you decided to go back to work, if your husband lost his job and you NEEDED to go back to work, or if, god fobid, you and your husband ever were seperated for some reason and you needed to work… that degree is a security blanket. It might not mean a glamorous and high-paying job right off. But it very well could be the difference between entry level office position in an air conditioned building and working the fryer at McDs.

Post # 28
Member
2401 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

My fiance has an English degree as well. It took him awhile to find non-copywriter work, but he finally found himself in communications and LOVES it. He’s making a lot of money and using his degree.

I work in higher ed at a job that doesn’t need a degree, but I def. got this position and the position I moved in to because of my degree and the skills I have from my background in education (I got a BMusic with music education major). Now I am working on my master’s in higher ed so I can move even further up.

Post # 29
Member
2738 posts
Sugar bee

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@lovekiss:  I know people who end up like you and that’s commendable. But can you tell the OP how you did it? Sometimes it is a long and winding road and people get discouraged. I had a degree in Psy and went to law school. Ugh, don’t get on me about student loan debt. I managed to graduate college without any debt because my parents were broke AND I went to community college for a year. Anyhow, law school, I went private. I wish I could do it over again. I’ve paid off about 60% though so that’s good but as it is, I want to leave the law so bad but the economy sucks really bad. Sorry OP, it seems bad now but I honestly believe some education is better than no education at all. Although 40k is very high for such a lesson!

Post # 31
Member
2580 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I believe a degree is worth it, regardless of your field of study. In many jobs, a degree is a degree and it is not always critical that you majored in something related to the job. I also agree with

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@CorgiTales:  that you never know what the future may bring and it can only help to have additional training and education.

I was so concerned in college about getting a practical degree that I ended up with a BS in Education instead of something in the social sciences (because it was not career-specific and I thought it would be useless). When I graduated, I realized that I did not really want to teach. Now I actually work in a health care-related position that has no relevance to my major, but I still feel my college experience prepared me for it. Sometimes it may be a winding path, but I am sure your investment in higher education will not be wasted.

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