(Closed) Elective c-section for large baby?

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 16
Member
9422 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

My mom had two c-sections and still has minor bladder issues…so I’m not sure that’s a 100% guarantee if you go that route. I personally would get a second or third opinion from the other doctor’s at the practice.

Post # 18
Member
4505 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I would not have an elective c-section.

You’ll want your baby to stay in the womb as long as he or she can (withiin reason — obviously not past 42 weeks). 39 weeks is totally fine — it’s definitely full-term — but the baby might naturally want to stay in there up to another 3 weeks. Unless it’s medically necessary, I would never take a baby out before it’s ready.

 

Post # 19
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

KCKnd2:  You beat me to it – I was going to leave the same link 🙂

The TL:DR of that article is that estimations of the baby’s size through ultrasound are inaccurate, far more women are told they will have a “big baby” than actually do, there’s much more danger in care providers thinking a woman will have a big baby than in actually having one (because they are more likely to push unnecessary interventions), and in most cases the risks of c-section far outweigh the risks of an elective c-section.

Post # 20
Member
2325 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015 - Ruby Princess

Bottom line, obstetricians are one of the most litigated specialties in medicine. The risks of a large baby vaginally, though rare, are due to shoulder dystocia. This scares the shit out of us. I’ve seen some very scary things happen, and although I’ve only seen one or two in my career, they are VERY memorable. Once you enter a hospital, we are liable for whatever happens. That’s why there are more elective sections for suspected large babies, less use of forceps/vacuum/ and less breech and vbac trials. It all comes down to doctors not wanting to get sued.

Post # 21
Member
187 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

as someone who struggled with a year of infertility treatments and endured a miscarraige, as soon as my doctor told me there was even the slightest chance our large baby could get stuck and injured in any way, i was on board with the c-section. it was just a no brainer from that moment on.

it wasn’t worth it to me to compromise my daughter’s well being just so i could have the birth experience i had imagined. 

my daughter was delivered via planned c-section and weighed in at 9 lb, 4 oz.  even though, i was a little out of it from the drugs, and suffered some minor complications due to excess blood loss, my doctor and i both felt we made the right decision.

having said that, only you, your partner, and your dr. can make the best decision for you. good luck!

Post # 22
Member
2487 posts
Buzzing bee

I had a 9 pound 5 oz baby via C section after 31 hours of labor, then had my second child, 9-11, by planned C section. Both deliveries were just fine, healthy babies, good Apgars, quick recoveries.

I can’t see any problem with DISCUSSING possibilities. Hopefully you have chosen the very best OB you could find.

A friend of mine had 2 VERY large babies vaginally, no problems. 

My first child had a mark across the skull for almost a year because the head was “stuck” under my pelvic bone, so I certainly did not want a repeat of That.

No woman should feel excessive dread for either sort of delivery as long as she has absolute confidence in her medical providers.

Wanted to add- absolutely no bladder problems before or since.

  • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by Profile Photo ann.reid.9277. Reason: added info
Post # 23
Member
9811 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

I would not have an elective csection based on an ultrasound that could be up to 2lbs (or more) off.  No way.  Do they suspect a big baby already?  The way you write it makes it sounds like they don’t even have a weight estimate yet and are still favoring a csection…no, no, no.  A 10lb estimate is not big enough for me to agree to a csection.  If we’re talking 12-13 lbs…then maybe.

Mine wasn’t too far off but was still off.  I believe they estimated 7lb 15oz baby at 40w and she was born 7lb 4oz at 41w (induction).

You’re free to make your own decision about what’s right for you, but that would be my reaction to it 🙂

Post # 24
Member
1178 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

I think something to consider is not only baby weight, but your own body type. Are you a slim lady with a very narrow pelvis? That adds to the complication.

I personally would have trust in my doctor because I didnt spend 8 years in school and another 4+ as a resident and fellow. But I always have a strong relationship with my doctors. I would not have continued to see a doctor whom i didn’t trust, so I would listen to them.

 

 

Post # 25
Member
1660 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

I’m a big believer of the idea that our bodies were built to birth babies, and our bodies would not grow babies bigger than we could birth (under normal circumstances… if you have gestational diabetes or some kind of pelvic injury/deformity that is obviously not ideal).  I also strongly believe that babies should stay in as long as they need to.  So an elective c-section would not be an option in my mind.  I’m 5’3″ relatively larger boned with wider hips, they are expecting me to birth a high 8-9+lb baby (I’m currently 40 weeks now), I have no concerns about being able to birth this baby.

That said, to each their own. You need to birth how you are comfortable and however you feel is best for you and baby. But do your research and make a completely educated decision (with your doctors of course).  I do think doctors push elective c-sections/inductions because it’s convenient for them and they can then control the outcome (like a PP had said, they just don’t want to be sued), so don’t feel pressured to do what they want just because it works best for their schedule. You and your baby are the most important ones in the decision.

Post # 26
Member
638 posts
Busy bee

wandering_gypsy:  I hear this argument a lot, but the human species is very poorly designed for giving birth. As soon as we started walking upright, our pelvises shrunk and human brains have been getting much bigger since we’ve been walking. I also feel this argument comes from a very priviledged position, as most forget that childbirth was the biggest killer of women up until the 20th century and is still the biggest killer in the developing world. 

I have no kids, but my mom had 4 c sections and doesn’t regret them at all. She was thin and short and was back to taking care of us within a week or so. 

Post # 27
Member
2087 posts
Buzzing bee

A friend of mine had her large baby (11lbs) vaginally. It was her 3rd child, so physically she was ok from it, but her baby ended up with a broken collar bone.

As long as the scheduled c-section wasn’t scheduled early, I’d be ok with it if the Dr recommended it.

Post # 29
Member
1660 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

princesslettuce14:  to each their own. I was a c-section baby (emergency), so I’m definitely glad they exist, but even with evolution I think pregnancy and birth is a pretty well developed system and most of the time it works just fine… All I’m saying is I personally wouldn’t get an ELECTIVE c-section, I have no trouble believing I can birth a large baby… but if something goes wrong I will be more than happy to have a c-section if that’s what’s best for the baby.  But I know for a fact other countries have far lower c-section rates than the US and their maternal death rates are lower as well, so I don’t think the “people used to die in childbirth all the time” arguement is that valid, people used to be a lot smaller too, they also may have eaten poorly (I’m talking hunter/gatherer days or the depression) and didn’t have access to prenatal care like we do these days and they also didn’t have access to medical care the way we do now… I’m not saying medical interventions aren’t necessary every once in a while, I just don’t think you should mess with nature unless it’s necessary.

Post # 30
Member
3081 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I was in your position. My baby was measuring consistently 3-4 weeks ahead. I thought my doctor would talk to me about elective c-section but they didn’t. Finally I brought it up and they indicated no studies or research showed benefits of elective c-section for the health of the baby or the mom when babies measured large in advance of delivery. I was happy to hear that and didn’t verify on my own, but ended up going into labor on my own at 39 weeks and had a really great labor experience and delivery with a 9 lb 5 oz baby boy. Second degree tears, relatively easy recovery (was even able to start working out again around 4 weeks). My baby was not enormous by any means, although if I had gone term he might have been close to 10 lbs. Still, I don’t think that I would have elected for a c-section unless some other factors or the baby’s health came into play. 

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