(Closed) Embarrassed to take my dog out

posted 3 months ago in Pets
Post # 16
Member
1764 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: City, State

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@dramaisnoqueen:  Before you get a prong collar, please consult with a professional on how they’re supposed to fit. The wrong fit can seriously harm a dog. Also, I would not resort to a prong collar until all other training has been tried. It’s not a fix… it’s a patch. Your dog should be capable of learning how to walk nicely on a normal collar and lead. He’s still very young, and German shepherds are incredibly smart. 

Your SO is a big problem. He needs to do all the work with feeding the dog if he’s set on doing that part. If you’re walking the dog, you need to be equally involved with the training sessions while walking him. What selfishness from a grown ass man. That kind of bullshit would not fly with me. If I had any part in the care of the dog at all, it’s “ours”, not just my SO’s. 

Post # 17
Member
96 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2019 - Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress

You don’t need your SO’s permission to train the puppy. Just do it. He probably won’t look up from his video games.

For walking behavior tips, I highly recommend joining the Pandemic Puppy Raising Support Group on Facebook. The mods are all professional trainers and will answer specific questions and point you to their amazing resources. We have a three month old GSD and their advice has been invaluable. 

Post # 18
Member
1499 posts
Bumble bee

I have a shepherd mix. We had her at 6 weeks old, and even though she was an absolute angel for my husband she was literally a demon dog to me. I enrolled into training classes and we did those together, which helped a lot. She was still a little spunky pain in the ass but she at least learned to respect me. 

Her leash training went really well so that wasn’t a big issue, but when she would see other dogs on walks she would go absolutely wild and crazy, jumping and pulling to try to get to them. She isn’t quite as big as your boy, but it was still a strong pull for me. I would like to say that the stopping mid walk to let the other dogs pass, or the completely crossing the street to avoid them actually helped. But really, I think she just grew out of it once she wasn’t a pup anymore. Now sometimes she still gets excited, but mostly just kinds her business when passing other dogs.

Also, a harness helped a ton!!!! KONG has the best one, with a handle on top that came in handy for grabbing her to chill out. 

I wish I had more advice for you, I totally understand. We have yet to break the excitement jumping when people come to the house even at 5 years old. It is SO embarrassing. 

Post # 19
Member
54 posts
Worker bee

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@dramaisnoqueen:  that choke chain is about 4 sizes too large so it isn’t effective at all. Needs to be up more behind your dogs ears to be effective. Try a smaller choke chain but you need to know how to use it to correct your dog. I would normally recommend prong collar too it’s way easier on dogs necks than a choke chain but if you don’t know how to use one it can damage or scare the dog and create aggression  –  so you need someone to show you how to use it. Leerburg.com has sizing advice (again high behind the ears, snug but not tight). I’d recommend a trainer to go through how to correct with it and stop pulling tho. Don’t get a harness they encourage dogs to pull. I have a working Belgian malinois protection dog and this works for us but we are an experienced team.

Post # 20
Member
147 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2021

I agree with NOT getting a prong collar. The first thing should be taking this puppy to training sessions. Have you ever even attempted such a thing? This is literally why they exist…..to rpevent these types of problems. Like come on, puppy 101. You won’t need a prong collar if the puppy is in training and you are doing what the trainer tells you to do. A harness is less pressure on the dog’s neck….if using a neck collar, be very careful pulling because you can really hurt your dog. A harness is still hard on their shoulder/chest bones, but it’s better than pressure on the neck. Big dogs NEED training. This is a non-negotiable. Don’t buy a puppy if everyone in the household is not on board with training. It will only get worse from here on out. 

Post # 22
Member
595 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2019

First, both humans in the house should be training the dog even if it’s your DH dog. It’s important that the dog can follow commands from both humans especially for safety. Your DH can do other bonding exercises and spend time with the dog.

Secondly, have you tried a Haltie? It’s a great training and walking tool. I highly recommend it. 

Post # 23
Member
74 posts
Worker bee

I love how puppy training posts always bring out the sanctimonious dog owners. The truth is, some dogs are way more difficult to train than others! I’ve had a Jack Russel that was basically born trained and had the absolute best manners with very little effort. Now I have a ten year old terrier cross and we’re STILL working on not freaking out when she sees another dog out on her walk. It is so embarrassing. Especially when other dog owners ask how old she is, assuming she’s a puppy, and I sheepishly tell them she is old enough that she should know better. I can assure you it’s not from a lack of trying.
I haven’t personally used the prong collar on a dog, but a friend has and she put it on my arm to mimick how it feels on her dog. It doesn’t hurt. It just gets their attention really well. 

Post # 26
Member
147 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2021

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@dramaisnoqueen:  Except no you didn’t. This is the only thing about training you say in your original post: “though only my s/o trained him (I wasn’t allowed to because he wanted it to be more his dog than ours – childhood trauma I guess)”. Nothing else was specified. You didn’t go to training sessions, and sometimes dogs need training sessions one-on-one for specific needs. Nothing I am saying is meant to be harsh or aggressive. I point out big dogs because it’s true – most of them need basics training, and if they continue showing problems, they need more training until it is dealt with. I am saying this as someone who has worked training former stray dogs and owner of 5 big dogs over the years. But do what you want. *shrugs* 

Post # 27
Member
6982 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2016

Our dog is beautifully trained in almost everything BUT leash walking. We’ve done what PP posted where we stop every time she pulls and wait until she’s no longer pulling, we run her a bit BEFORE the walk so she can get some energy out, we praise her when she’s doing a good job. She just seems to believe that the first 10 minutes of the walk should involve her pulling the lead until she coughs and has to stop and sit 50 times. It’s her own special ritual. She does it less with my husband because his arms are heavy as hell, but even with him . . . 

Good luck with your dog. I do agree that your SO is a big part of the problem here. His traumas sound severe but if he cares about you and/or the dog, he should want what is best for all involved. Or if he wants the dog to be “his” dog, he needs to be stepping up more in the work department. Sounds like the dog isn’t the only one who needs to work on his training!

Post # 28
Member
869 posts
Busy bee

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@dramaisnoqueen:  no advice, just wanted to say that your pup is so cute and precious. 

Post # 29
Member
574 posts
Busy bee

i don’t have any advice to offer, but a lot of these comments seem super judgmental to me.  despite many different classes, leashes, and training programs, our dog still has leash anxiety and pulls like crazy when he sees another dog.  he is only 46 lbs so i can still control him even if he pulls, but it makes walking stressful.  we just keep an eagle eye out for other dogs and cross the street/avoid them at all costs.  

 

it can be embarassing, but i’ve just learned to ignore what other people think.  it’s none of their business anyway.

Post # 30
Member
8997 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@dramaisnoqueen:  I haven’t read all of the responses, but train the dog yourself. Your boyfriend is being a childish moron. A dog should be able to be controlled by everyone in the household (or at a minimum everyong who is responsible for any amount of care, which you are). You should not need physical strength in order to control your animal – I have an 80lb lab/shepherd mix and I can lift him (when he cooperates) and yank him away from rolling in something gross, but if he ever really wanted to take off on me he’s much stronger and could. But he doesn’t because we’ve trained him. He follows commands from my toddler and will walk extra slow and gentle if she’s holding the leash (with a parent). 

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