(Closed) Engagement rings–make sure it is Conflict free

posted 9 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
937 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

*sigh* well there goes the end of the movie ruined 🙁

Post # 4
Member
7052 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I recently spoke with a well known jeweller in town here and he assured me that 99 percent of all diamonds sold AT A REPUTABLE jeweller are conflict free.

He said it’s somewhat become the thing to advertise that a diamond is conflict free and in some instances, giving it that extra label (when it was already to begin with) can just jack up the price of the stone.

I also was concerned after I saw blood diamond also but am glad I asked.  He said that sometimes by tacking on that label or making something (already that way) eco-friendly have become buzz words for "more expensive".

Talk to your jeweller.  Most of them do not support buying diamonds from places where that type of conflict happens.

Post # 5
Member
139 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

bellanga – I’m going to have to disagree. How can a jeweller say for sure that all the diamonds they sell are conflict free? I also disagree that it’s just a tactic being used to increase the prices of diamonds. The only way you can guarantee that a diamond is conflict free In My Humble Opinion is to find out where it is from. I specifically told my Fiance that I would not want a conflict diamond for my engagement ring – and you know how he did that? He purchased ONLY certified Canadian diamonds. Yes you may pay a premium on the diamond – but it’s a small price to pay knowing that no blood was shed for it.

Post # 6
Member
1266 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I am sure this might get to be a touchy topic…

Post # 7
Member
35 posts
Newbee

my diamond was an heirloom. It was the origional diamond from my grandmother’s engagement ring.  I don’t have any way to know if it was ‘conflict free’ or not.  Personally (although I am thrilled to have it due to the sentimental value) I don’t really purchase jewlery and tend to think its a waste of money : ( I know i will likely get a  lot of flack for that.  i DO treasure the heirloom jewels I have received over the years and I DO like diamonds, I am just a cheap skate I guess. I tried to think of something intelligent to contribute to this post but i feel pretty out of the loop as i have never been diamond shopping myself.

Post # 8
Member
2476 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I’ve often thought about this subject, not so much because of the movie, but just because it’s a well-known fact that human beings are suffering, being murdered, being tortured for the diamond industry.  These people have no choice in life.  I personally believe DeBeers and the other big diamond companies are only in it for the money.  They don’t care about the poor African boy who got his hand blown off or cut off for diamonds.  It’s really ludicrous and disgusting to me.  IMO, there is no way to gaurantee a "conflict-free" diamond unless you are able to trace it allllllll the way back to when it was first found.  The big diamond companies just slap the label "conflict-free" on their African diamonds and everyone is expected to believe them.  Sorry if I sound cynical, but it really pains me to think of poor innocent people suffering for us to be able to wear "bling bling." 

@MrsBtobe  — Mine is also a Canadian diamond, which makes me feel a little better, but still… I wonder how anyone can truly tell. 

Post # 9
Member
196 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I agree with ddbuzz – there is no way to know if a diamond is TRULY conflict free.  I asked a jeweller here in Chicago when we first started looking and he said a lot of comapnies and jewellers will tell you that "Yes, it is conflict free" when in fact they have no idea and it is almost impossible to find out.  You really think that anyone is going to admit that "yes, we do have boy soliders with missing limbs digging for diamonds." 

I agree it is our responosiblity to be aware and do what we can, but you have to find out facts, first.  I’m happy that you started with the fictional movie Blood Diamonds, but do some more research, too.  It is hollywood afterall, where they spend millions on having 30 karat diamond necklaces, earrings, etc. 

Post # 10
Member
278 posts
Helper bee

I have to agree with most on this.  There’s no way we can tell whether it is 100% conflict free.  Even if it’s certified, it doesn’t mean it’s conflict free either.  We just have to be aware and hopefully someone will shed light on those companies that are encouraging this by purchasing blood daimonds.

Post # 11
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

If you’re concerned about it, you could always get a lab-created diamond.  🙂 

(I mention this because I am a big nerd and watched a Discovery channel show a couple weeks ago about how they actually make lab-created diamonds.  It’s such a cool process!)

Post # 12
Member
7081 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Mine is a diamond that can be traced to a location based on it’s color signature.  (Think Kimberly mined diamonds).  I think this is a very touchy subject, and I would caution us that what is right for one person may be different for another.  Each of us has to use conscience as our guide….

Post # 13
Member
209 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

I actually wrote about this topic on my blog. When I was younger I wanted a diamond and then I started reading about DeBeers and was turned off. I’ve always liked diamonds but never wanted the center stone to be a diamond because I prefer sapphires, but I like diamonds as accents. I’ve had this topic with some of my friends, as Black women, we discuss this a lot because we feel a kinship with Africa…but even with all of my reading and all of the assurances of jewelers–you don’t really know…you never know. My jeweler says my tiny side stones are conflict-free, but how would I go back and trace that?

There’s this thing called the Kimberley Process by the UN to get countries to certify the origin of their diamonds…but it’s not an actual law–the companies who join and agree to the self-regulation and the guidelines of the Process. If a company can’t verify the origin the punishment is that they are kicked out of the group and the other countries will not trade with them and it looks bad. But this is not a law–if a person is worried about "blood diamonds" then they can do research on countries that are participants and try to buy a diamond from one of these countries.

BUT how can we ever really know unless we see with our own eyes where the diamond came from?

Post # 14
Member
7052 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I would trust a professional would know whom he has purchased from. 

Post # 15
Member
209 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

Right, a professional would know who he’s purchased from–but where did the person he/she bought the diamond from get it? Jewelers don’t always deal directly with a mining company, there’s usually more than two companies in the chain–so a jeweler could buy diamonds from their source thinking that they are "conflict-free" but in fact the source could have gotten the diamonds in a conflict zone. Also, I don’t think any jeweler would ever say their diamonds weren’t conflict free–if someone’s asking about that they want to keep the customer. My jeweler says my diamonds are conflict free–the diamonds I got as sidestones were similarily priced to diamonds with no advertisement of being conflict free or eco-diamonds.

I think it’s good that people are at least aware, questioning and having discussions like this one–but until there are laws with harsh punishments–there is no guarantee–so you either don’t buy diamonds or you do. People have to do what they are comfortable doing, I was comfortable with my fiance getting me a ring with diamonds–even without some form of documentation saying "Conflict Free."

Post # 16
Member
5 posts
Newbee

the jeweler may purchase from a middleman… not directly from the mine that the diamond came from. the jeweler, like others have said, may not know either. if you are concerned, you should ask about the sources and do the research yourself (what i plan on doing when the time comes). i have done missions work in africa and could never blindly purchase a diamond, but thats my personal experience. what you dont know won’t make you feel guilty, but i think if you are aware of the situation, conflict-free should absolutely be on your list of diamond purchasing requirements… right up there with carat count, setting, shape, etc.

 

just my 2¢.

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