(Closed) EUROPE trip for one year anniversary-where should we go?!

posted 5 years ago in Travel
Post # 16
Member
278 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I agree about Rome, it really is a dirty, city that is so disappointing… Italy is a beautiful country, just not Rome.

I would recommend Berlin, Prague and Krakov, also I do not know about your budget but Reikjavik is absolutely amazing if you can afford

Post # 17
Member
216 posts
Helper bee

Agree with tails: – Iceland as a whole is breathtaking. If you’re up for a driving holiday, there are companies that can put together itineraries and accommodation for you tailored to budget, make your bookings, send you tickets and maps.. and off you go!

Post # 18
Member
528 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

CountingSheep:  direct flights from dublin to reykjavik with wow airlines too. i’ve been there twice, once in early april. Dont think theres much to see in reykjavik though. amazing country all the same.

Post # 19
Member
665 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

There’s way too much to see in Rome for just 4 days. What about Bruges? It’s gorgeous and adorable and the food is great and you can hop into Brussels for a day – or do the opposite. I actually did the opposite – one day in Bruges, 2 in Brussels and we covered quite a lot. Pretty much all the big sights, including the Atomium. And the food was AMAZING. Brussels has killer brunch. But don’t skip Bruges though – IT’S SO BEAUTIFUL and only an inexpensive hour away from Brussels.

I haven’t been to Lisbon but it’s number one on my list of places to visit and it just seems SO beautiful and awesome.

Also I LOVED ROME and it’s one of the cities I really, really hope to get a chance to revisit some day. There is just so much history there, you can’t take two steps without hitting some lovely old church or well preserved monument. If you like history, definitely don’t count it out as a destination at some point. Yes, it’s a bit run down and I never figured out how to navigate the bus system but there’s so, so, so much to see – stuff you won’t even see in guide books. And that’s not even talking about the Vatican. (And I didn’t see The Sistine chapel because it was closed when I was there.) But there are so many beautiful churches, especially the Basilica of St, John (more impressive than St. Peter’s to me), the Colloseum, the Forum, the Pantheon, Palatine Hill, Piazza del Popolo, Castel Sant’Angelo (best views), Circus Maximus, the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument. I’m shocked to see so many people say they disliked it. I would go back in a heartbeat!

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 2 months ago by  papillon20.
Post # 20
Member
1039 posts
Bumble bee

I second Bruges. It’s gorgeous, very walkable and you can even add a day in Ghent or Brussels. We went there while on a trip in Europe (Brussels/Paris/Amsterdam) and it was definitly a highlight. It’s incredibly quaint and romantic.

Post # 21
Member
690 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Sorrento hands down. We stayed at a wonderful bed and breakfast and had this amazing view for 4 days. 

Post # 22
Member
1987 posts
Buzzing bee

Well, since others have given their views on Rome, here’s mine: OP, my personal opinion is that Rome is no more gritty than most other major cities.  To be fair, the area around the Colosseum/Roman Forum/Pantheon is not sanitized in the way that the area around, say, Times Square is, but this is something I actually kind of appreciate about Rome.  Rome, unlike other parts of Italy like Venice, the Cinque Terre, and central Florence, is not forced to almost completely cater to the demands and fears of visitors, and that is also something I appreciate greatly about the city.  

Unlike the places I named in the previous paragraph–two of which I adore, by the way, but for very different reasons than I appreciate Rome–I see Rome as a real city, whose primary concern is for its many residents who are living, working, studying, and raising families.  As the seat of government in a country that loves the art of the protest, there are moments of disruption and violence that look somewhat scary to American citizens, who have little stomach for these things (don’t worry–neither the Italian authorities nor the protestors have any desire for you to become involved and these things are carefully organized). 

There is so much to do in Rome that it is overwhelming; this is what gave me anxiety about the city at first.  If you visit Rome you will have the opportunity to expose yourself to many important Classical, early Christian, late Renaissance, and Baroque works of art and architecture (to name the highlights only).  If you’re a 20th century history person and willing to do some basic research online, you can learn a lot about neighborhoods and urban projects that developed in support of, and then as a reaction to, Fascism in Italy.  With a little bit of research and care, you can find places that serve lovely versions of traditional dishes like carbonara or coda, and, unlike many other common tourist cities in Italy, you can also find fine non-Italian restaurants in the city.  You can take the trams out to the outlying neighborhoods and simply watch people.  You can go to one of the big open spaces like the Villa Borghese or the Villa Pamphilij and picnic, or walk along the Passeggiata del Gianicolo and get a great view of the city. 

I would absolutely agree that any visit to Rome that just focused on the “expected” stuff (the Colosseum, the Trevi, the Spanish Steps, the Borghese Gallery, the Vatican, etc.) would lack something.  The Trevi’s just a fountain and does not, in and of itself, have special powers, La Dolce Vita aside.  The romance and magic come from the spontaneous and felicitous combination of the beauty of the setting, the plesant company of one’s companion, and a certain (pardon the French) je ne sais quoi.  When the Trevi is scaffolded or surrounded by a million people who are all desperate to have the same special WOW in the fifteen minutes that they gave themselves to be at the fountain before they have to move on to the next thing on the list, of course it will disappoint.  So–find another fountain, find another statue, find another quaint street.  The city is littered with them, and with the opportunities to have that magical feeling, if you’re willing to push things just a little!

Post # 23
Member
987 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

MstoMrsH: I was in Rome in October too! Maybe we passed each other ๐Ÿ™‚

msmorganitebee: I would say Rome Rome Rome!!! We absolutely loved it (the only scaffolding was the on the Trevi Fountain) and are already desperate to go back and see more. My alternative suggestion is Athens, although it’s a little rougher around the edges ๐Ÿ˜‰ Also on my list of places to re-visit.

Places I haven’t been but would love to go include Barcelona, which has already had a mention, and Seville. Maybe think about whether you want somewhere a bit warmer than home or a bit of a chilly adventure ๐Ÿ™‚ How about Reyjavik?? Argh, I better stop before I end up booking myself a ton of trips, lol. Have fun wherever you go!

Post # 24
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

As a European I would definitely recommend Barcelona! It is a lovely place and a ‘good’ example of a European city!

Also Florence is really lovely too ๐Ÿ™‚ 

Post # 25
Member
771 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

Slovenia is stunning. Best place I have been so far (And been to 14 countries across 3 continents)

Post # 26
Member
121 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

msmorganitebee:  I have also been living in Ireland! How neat ๐Ÿ™‚ I would recommend Rome. So amazing. Berlin is also quite nice. If you like Sunny and Beautiful, do Dubrovnik.

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 2 months ago by  Klb895.
Post # 27
Member
121 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

Also, I agree with MarriedtoMyWork. It was the most “real” European city I have been to. and WAY cleaner than Dublin.

Post # 28
Member
551 posts
Busy bee

I have been to Rome and let me tell you…it is AMAZING! There is so much to see and do. If you research and stay in a hotel in the city, you are within walking distance of many attractions, including the Trevi fountain and the Spanish Steps. The Colosseum is also within walking distance depending on where you stay. This city is truly beautiful and has such a rich history, not to mention the gelato is out of this world! It has been over a year since I have been there and I still think about it almost every day. I say you should definitely choose Rome! We were there for 4 days before traveling on to Florence, Pisa, and Venice. The only problem is that I do not think you can see everything in just two days…if you have three days, you may be able to squeeze it in. Four days would be ideal.

Post # 29
Member
764 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

We did a pre-river cruise honeymoon extension in Prague for three days, and it was amazing.  I also felt like it was the perfect amount of time for a general overview of the city. I totally recommend it, and I understand that its one of the few eEuropean cities than weren’t leveled by the wars – lots of original architecture. 

Post # 30
Member
9544 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

My favorite European cities have been Rome and Budapest. If I was going for a long weekend, I’d probably pick Budapest. I also really loved Prague and Florence. Brugge could be a cute little retreat for a weekend. They’re a little farter away, but I also loved Istanbul and Athens! Honestly, the only place that I haven’t liked was Venice. My husband also raves about Barcelona!

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