(Closed) Fancy White Diamonds, not Colorless I said White Diamonds!

posted 8 years ago in Rings
Post # 19
Member
3108 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

That one can’t be a VS2 — they look like they do because they’re really heavily included. My favorite thing about diamonds is the way they reflect light, so I don’t think I’d like one of these very much.

Post # 21
Member
3108 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@dewingedpixie:  It’s an SI2 graded by IGI which would be an I1, I2, or I3 graded by GIA.

Post # 25
Member
5317 posts
Bee Keeper

…actually those pinpoints that make it “white” ARE the inclusions. The diamond is consistently cloudy. That is what a white diamond is, and it’s worthwhile to keep in mind, as it’s good to be aware that it won’t interact with light the way another “fancy colored” diamond (e.g., yellow or pink) would. I’ve always seen it described specifically as “fancy white” or “milky white diamonds” rather than “white” or “white colored” since it’s not exactly a colored stone per se, it is a clear stone with white inclusions.

It seems the grade for these milky whites (is it GIA grading those? The grades seem rather generous) is based on the density of the cloud, i.e., better clarity grade for more light penetration. But all of these should be I clarity diamonds, they are (by definition) heavily included.

Personally I really like a similar sort of semi-opaque look in moonstone and opals, but milky white diamonds don’t ring my bell. I guess because moonstones and opals each have iridescent colors as well, but a milky white diamond is semi-opaque white, end of story. They do not tend to refract colors pretty much at all. Clarity is important in diamond performance, and clouds are the most performance-diminshing of all the inclusion types. Think of it as similar to a heavy fog.

Post # 26
Member
1740 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Very cool looking! Not my cup of tea, but I’d still love to see one IRL.

Post # 28
Member
5317 posts
Bee Keeper

@dewingedpixie:  I had never heard of a gemstone called chariote, I had to look it up… it looks exaclty like sugilite, which I do know, and I agree it’s beautiful! You’re lucky to own a piece. I’ve only seen them, don’t own any myself.

Now you’ve sent me on a mystery mission. Some sites are saying that chariote is sugilite from a Russian deposit, other sites are saying no, chariote is a different mineral than sugilite… and annoyingly, my gem books don’t list chariote in their appendices at all… ahhh but now I really want to know the answer, lol!

Post # 29
Member
5317 posts
Bee Keeper

Hmm, I think sugilite and chariote are more like brothers than identical twins.. in that case I don’t even think I’ve ever seen chariote… But it sounds pretty cool… I’ll have to keep my eyes peeled for it!

Post # 31
Member
7828 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

I have to agree with joya aspera on this one. I rather like the iridescent quality of opals or moonstones, but a “white” diamond doesn’t do much for me. And while I wouldn’t want to own one, I actually like the effect of very strong fluorescence that causes a stone to turn a purple/blue opaque colour in the sunlight. They are extraordinarily rare, and they look like normal diamonds in light without UV rays. Indeed, fluorescence is an interesting thing in diamonds, as it used to be highly prized in diamonds of high colour grading and they were sold as “blue-white” stones. Then they were mis-marketed and vendors sold lower coloured stones with fluorescence as “blue-whites” which wasn’t accurate. They eventually no longer allowed the term “blue-white” to be used at all.

Overall, the feeling is that as more and more diamond vendors became bigger and bigger, they had neither the time nor the inclination to examine the diamonds they bought very well or to explain the concept of flurorescence to the customers, so most large vendors avoided it completely. GIA testing indicates that even most stones with strong blue fluorescence have no ill effect from it whatsoever (fluorescing in different colours is also possible, as the Hope Diamond fluoresces red). And there are now vendors selling a “blue” line of diamonds.

Of course, none of that changes the fact that fluorescence is no longer prized nor sought after in diamonds for most people, and therefore it either has no effect on a diamond’s price or a stone with fluorescence sells at a lower price. But for those interested in the effect (and it can make near-colourless stones appear colourless under normal crcumstances), they are a great buy.

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