Fathers not allowed in room for birth in NYC

posted 4 days ago in Pregnancy
Post # 46
Member
1123 posts
Bumble bee

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HisMoon :  

Yes.  I think they should definitely be considering feedback from staff during this chaos.  I think nurses spend the most time interacting closely with patients for longer periods of time (doctors are dashing here and there and have little time to give per patient) so I’ve always felt that feedback from nurses is critically valuable for that reason.  This is all changing so fast.  The FDA gave emergency approval to a rapid covid19 test that they predict to be available by the thousands per week by April.  I’m sure that’s not news to you, since this is your everyday. I hope that pans out.  In the meantime, every day must feel like forever.  Thank for your service.  I hope and pray that you will be safe.

Post # 47
Member
2817 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2017 - Courthouse

I heard about this yesterday and spent almost all day crying. I’m 36 weeks pregnant with my first child. I’m not in NY and I’m hoping where I live doesn’t come to this. Honestly, I feel like it’s inhumane to not allow a birth partner.

Like PP have stated, if the father has symptoms, odds are that the mother does too. Or that the mother is carrying the virus. Someone has to drive and drop off the mother and pick her up with her new born. So I don’t see this as protecting the mother and/or baby. 

Also, some hospitals HAVE put into place that your support person isn’t allowed to leave. I have no problem with my husband not allowing to leave the room, go to the cafeteria, hang out in the waiting room, etc. I also have no problem with support people not being allowed if they are showing symptoms of Covid, have a temperature, etc. 

Hospitals are also facing shortages of medical staff not. Even in ordinary situations, your labor nurse isn’t with you the whole time. Now it might be even less time with you. So essentially, a large portion of your labor would be completely alone. I don’t know, to me, mandating that a pregnant woman labors alone (as in, a lot of her labor with no nurse even) is completely uncalled for. 

This whole mandate also goes against what many health organizations believe such as WHO as well as a lot of medical professionals. 

I know I’m completely biased as I will be giving birth in about a month. But I don’t think this would help, if anything, I think a lot of mothers and babies would suffer from the repercussions of such an extreme measure. 

Post # 48
Member
1123 posts
Bumble bee

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sarathemermaid :  

I’m not pregnant and I completely agree with you.  Active symptoms, no.  I don’t think that should be allowed.  But asymptomatic? Everybody has different opinions, but I don’t see how the benefits (miniscule if any) outweigh the costs which are huge.  A woman who is emotionally supported during delivery is statistically proven to have a healthier outcome and require less medical intervention.  I’m sorry this is all happening when you’re expecting.  Wishing you health and safety.

Post # 49
Member
2817 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2017 - Courthouse

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gimmepretty :  Amen! And thank you. I’m hoping it won’t affect me. It’s a scary time but I just keep reminding myself that my family is all healthy and I’ve had a healthy pregnancy so far. So regardless of how the birth goes, in no time I’ll have a little healthy baby 🙂 

Post # 50
Member
50 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: March 2018

coffeecakez MiniMeow:

  As a doctor in NYC, at an ER with a larger population of covid patients than NYP (a health system, not a specific hospital), I can tell you that based on our populations here, this policy does not make sense. If a wife or husband has it, the other one will too. You also are not contagious during the entire duration of contraction.

Either way, there are ways to mitigate this issue that do not put mother and baby at risk by having them labor alone. You can restrict couples from ever leaving their rooms, require that if they come – they provide PPE for themselves, and/or test both husband and wife (they are already testing the mothers). Birthing partners already have to register when they arrive (not exactly patients – but they get hospital bracelets and are monitored similarly), so it’s not like visitors in other sections of the hospital. Also taking the temperature (a measure that doesn’t mean much to begin with in terms of infectivity) of 2 people versus 1, is not going to add more than a minute to a nurse’s workload. Finally, NYC hospitals already do not allow for non-patients in waiting rooms, hallways or cafeterias (that are now closed). These things are not beyond security measures that are already in place and grant the immense benefit of having a partner to advocate for you and provide support during a process that is emotionally and physically stressful, and sometimes deadly in and of itself. 

People want to believe that quarantine is the answer for this pandemic, but we are past the point of this having much effect, at least in NYC. Too much of the population already has it. The people who made these policies are not on the frontlines. They are making these decisions as administrators (not infectious disease doctors), from offices far separated from the ERs where people have to share oxygen tanks and we have to ration ventilators. I, more than anyone, want us to erradicate this virus. But we have to be thoughtful about all aspects of healthcare when making decisions like this, and this was a kneejerk reaction to fear. 

As for homebirths, I agree with PPs that advocate for them in a controlled setting with experienced providers. But I too see this as another negative downstream effect of this policy–one where women haphazardly contract to have a homebirth at the last minute, without proper preparation or care.

This policy is going to hurt more than it helps. 

Post # 51
Member
938 posts
Busy bee

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bluebell83 :  Are you NYC H+H? You don’t have to answer but I have a good friend who is an ER nurse at Bellevue and she’s just been in the fucking weeds for a while now. I know a number of NYC H+H hospitals have just been destroyed with cases. 

My husband may be at one of the only hospitals left that isn’t close to capacity and has some wiggle room, but I know that’s coming to an end soon and he’ll be far more involved than I want him to be. I don’t think there’s necessarily a right answer here, but he does agree with you. Their similar policy went into effect this morning and he thinks it’s stupid, but concedes he can see the logic from a 10,000 foot view from someone not living in the trenches. 

This all just sucks. I so deeply hope that the city starts to right itself soon. It’s hard living in a city that is usually so full of life and just watching things continue to slide. Thinking good thoughts for you and all of the docs and nurses going up against this. 

Post # 53
Member
6825 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

It says the two women were later diagnosed with Covid-19. In other words, they likely would have tested positive and have been carriers regardless of whether their partners were there or not. Even after reading the article, I am baffled as to how this will make hospital staff any safer. 

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