(Closed) Feeding section of registry…so confused!

posted 4 years ago in Babies
Post # 2
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I ended up having to exclusively pump (so far) since my son was a preemie.  Your insurance will get you a pump, but it won’t come with much (take it even if you don’t know you’ll use it, you might and then won’t have to try to get it – the LC in the hospital had them bring one to my room and charge my insurance).  I had to get different size flanges, but you should be able to get that stuff from a LC at the hospital before you go home if you need it.

Now I’m back to work so I have to pump here 3x a day.  I had to buy:

A bag to carry the pump, etc, in.

A handsfree pumping bra (two, actually, they are indispensible)

A manual pump for $30 for when I’m just out running errands and don’t want to set up my electric.

Bottles for feeding, or at least nipples for the (most likely) Medela bottles

A little cooler and icepack (and more bottles) to carry breastmilk home from work.

A million breastmile storage bags

A bottle brush (we use the regular drying rack)

 

If you plan to return to work, you’ll need all that stuff.  If not, I recommend a manual pump (the Medela ones works great) for when you’re out and about and get engorged, and something to store milk in for if you pump before you leave baby for a while.  Bottles are fine if you’re just pumping today for feeding tomorrow, otherwise you’ll want to have some other storage system so you can freeze it.  Then even if you feed formula you’ll need bottles.  They usually come with infant nipples, so just buy a few.  Get one of the more boob-shaped ones if you want to continue to breasfeed, otherwise get whatever.  Also get a script for Newman’s Nipple Cream before you leave the hospital.  

Even when you return to work, you can breastfeed at night and then choose whether or not you want to pump during the day.  It doesn’t have to be all or nothing.  It is a drag to do it though, won’t lie.

Post # 3
Member
9818 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

Ali-oop:  

Get a couple bottles- like 2 or 3.  Just one brand.  When you decide to try bottles you can go from there.  Baby will either take what you have (if they’re not picky) or you’ll have to go and try out other kinds.  But no reason to stock up on bottles IMO.

I would get a pump through insurance because it’s free so why not? Plus you might need to use it anyway in an emergency- so always good to have on hand.

What will you be doing AFTER 16 weeks? If you’re not pumping then that means formula so you will need a supply of bottles and a drying rack.  Even if you pump at work, you will still need bottles and a drying rack (or just a simple drying pad like I used).  I would recommend 6-12 bottles.  BUT don’t buy a bunch and open them unless you’re sure baby will take them. Also, you don’t want the higher flow nipples if you are breastfeeding.  Just the stage1 or even the premie nipples.  I believe the bottles all come with stage 1 (or equivalent) nipples.  Don’t buy the higher stages.

For the first 16 weeks:

  • nursing bra (start with a sleep style nursing bra since your size won’t be finalized until a week or two after birth). 
  • Maybe some nursing friendly tops.  Either nursing specific ones or ones that can just be unbuttoned or pulled aside.  I just wore my maternity tanks, they could just be pulled down.
  • nursing pads (get a box- some people use tons, some don’t use any)
  • lanolin
  • maybe a boppy if you want.  I was too tall for it so I just used pillows
  • boobs

Can’t think of much else!!

Post # 4
Member
9818 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

For pumping:

  • pump
  • cooler +bottles (mine came with).  I mean the medela or ameda 5-7oz storage bottles.
  • handsfree pumping bra
  • bottles (for feeding)
  • drying rack or drying pad
  • bottle brush
  • milk storage bags
  • car adapter for pump

Possible different size flanges.  And extra parts like membranes.

Post # 5
Member
1401 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I planned to breastfeed and ended up combination feeding. What I initially found really useful was:

– nipple cream and breast pads (tho perhaps not something for the registry!)

– three or four feeding tank tops (one of these underneath plus a shirt on top is usually pretty modest and can eliminate the felt need for a feeding cover. I lived in these and yoga pants for the first few weeks.

– feeding pillow

– a starter pack of bottles and a thing of formula (even if you plan on and succeed at exclusively breastfeeding, these can still come in handy a few months down the line when you’re wanting to let someone else feed the baby for date nights if you haven’t been able to pump or if you need to go back go work and aren’t able to pump enough to give exclusive breastmilk).

– a good DOUBLE pump. Double because 1) it’s way faster and 2) you get a better let-down and more volume when both are going at the same time. Not everyone likes pumping, and I didn’t get one before the birth because I thought it might go unused, but I ended up ordering one in the hospital and loved having mine. Aside from benefits like helping me to increase my supply in the early days with very sleepy feeders and also prep for outings by pumping in advance, having agood pump meant the difference between mostly breastmilk and a full-formula diet when my babies ended up refusing to breastfeed at 8 weeks with a bad case of oral thrush. 

– a hands-free pumping bra. Seriously so much easier and makes all the difference for let-down on a machine as you can go about your business and forget about the weirdness of being pumped like Daisy the cow. It helps to not stress about how much you’re collecting, which can happen when you’re doing nothing but holding the thing in place and just watching it work. 

– some DVD box sets or a series for your iPad to watch during feeding!

Post # 6
Member
4891 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Following – all good to know!

Post # 7
Member
9511 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I sort of put an assortment on our registry since I have no clue what will work for us. I did the Medela bottle set that goes right onto the pump, and also some other little 3 packs of other brands. I figure it’s a good idea to have a few different options just in case. I also put a drying rack on there, because hey why not.

I didn’t put any actual boob stuff on there because I felt weird about it though, haha. But I did buy some lanolin, nipple butter, breast pads and some cooling gel thingies for your tatas.

I will be getting my pump free through insurance, but I plan on waiting to buy any major accessories for it until I know for sure how much I’ll be using it (bag, hands free bra, etc).

Post # 8
Member
2902 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

This is all great advice so I don’t have much to add, except that I was really happy to have bottles and formula when we came home from the hospital. I fully intended to exclusively breastfeed but had a really low supply and latching issues and we had to start supplementing with formula before leaving the hospital. I’m sure Darling Husband could have run to the store for bottles and formula but it was nice to have some at home. 

Also, don’t forget to introduce a bottle at some point after your breastfeeding relationship is established but before 16 weeks – otherwise you risk having a baby who refuses to take a bottle. A few of my friends are going through that now, right before they have to return to work, and it sucks. 

Post # 9
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

True, my SIL has two girls who won’t take a bottle.  She stays at home so it’s not usually an issue, but after breastfeeding almost nonstop for 2 1/2 years, she could use a break once in a while.  

Post # 10
Member
4192 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - Baltimore Museum of Industry

I like the boon drying rack- the little flowers are actually helpful for stacking, and it’s cute. Most of the time I sterilize bottles, etc. in the dishwasher, but the Medela steamer bags are nice to have for those times in between, if you travel, etc.

Post # 12
Member
2449 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Ali-oop:  working on my registry too and got overwhelmed by the options, but a friend recommended the Kiinde system to me so I think we’re going with that. I like that you can direct pump into the bags which go into the bottles and you don’t have to wash bottles! Also there are adapters for various brands of nipples so you don’t have to waste money trying different bottles, just nipples which are a lot cheaper! The bags are a bit more expensive but I’m okay with that for convenience (esp for daycare!). Got a free Evenflo drop in bottle with the target welcome registry gift pack too, so those nipples would be the first I’d try if the Kiinde ones don’t work out. Also planning the boon lawn rack! 

Post # 13
Member
1810 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I completely agree with all the information you have received here! I will say I never bought a handsfree bra…I ended up making the most ghetto/super bad looking one out of an old sports bra that was a size or two too small. I literally cut two small holes where I could fit my flanges through and BAM! saved some money lol.

This is also the best drying rack ever! I got the larger version, because I ended up having to exclusively pump for twins so we had twins the bottles.

Post # 14
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

HeyJude72:  I think the Kiinde stuff looks cool, just not practical.  I don’t always pump exactly the same amount, so it would drive me crazy to have bags of milk anywhere from 1.5 to 4+ oz, which is what I can get from each breast, depending.  It might work if you’re already established breastfeeding and are just pumping during the day, I guess, so you’re more likely to pump what your baby would be eating.  I’m just too OCD for it.  🙂

We do have the Kozi and it’s amazing.  I’m trying to get the little guy used to cool/cold bottles, but we do still warm them at home, and use it to defrost frozen milk.  

We use the NUK storage bags because they had good reviews and are cheap.  I’m exclusively pumping for our preemie, so he’s up to eating about half what I pump.  We’ve already gone through a couple hundred bags since he came home a month ago.  

Post # 15
Member
2449 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

almostmrsj:  yeah I don’t know if it would hold the same appeal for exclusive pumping- but I’ll be pumping starting probably a month or so in to start getting baby used to a bottle and at 12 was will be pumping 3 times a day 5 days a week for work and not planning to exclusively pump (But I know there are often curveballs!) 

I’ve heard good things about the Simple Wishes hands free pumping bra from Amazon 

The topic ‘Feeding section of registry…so confused!’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors