(Closed) Fiance wants to join Army Reserves?

posted 8 years ago in Military
Post # 3
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

My husband’s now in the reserves. BUT he has a contract and is NON deployable. Only because he was previously active duty. Otherwise you don’t just get a non deployable contract.

I know many many reservists who have gone to Iraq. in fact, all of them. And, they are deployable across the united states for periods of time (sometimes a month, sometimes more) for national disasters. Like Katrina. But lots of stuff–earthquake rescue and help, etc.

Your Fiance would have “drill” one weekend a month, every month. For Darling Husband, this is a 6:30am-5:00pm gig on Saturdays and Sundays. Next weekend he has a field training exercise all day Friday-Sunday and has to stay on the base 2 hours away. His typical station of duty is 30 minutes away though, and he comes home after drill. For some of my friends, they had to stay in hotels because it was too far away to just come home.

Also, every year, he has a 2-3 week training thing. Darling Husband got offered a slot in Washington and one in Texas. They can vary greatly depending on the times they are offered and the availability.

As far as day to day life, it’s the same as if he had a regular job. It just changes up occassionally and he has to maintain proper military standards–he has to meet height and weight and has to be able to pass his PT tests on a regular basis. He also has to keep “look standards” like hair cuts–which means if your Fiance has long hair, earrings, facial hair, etc, those are all no-nos.

Why does he want to join?

Post # 4
Member
83 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

You will probably see lots of advice, I’m going to share just a few of the major issues/complaints I come across in my day to day dealings with families, command, and soldiers directly:

#1 As Ejs4y8 said: Unless you have it writing-they are ALL deployable–even AFTER he is out. See #3!  Deployeable does not always mean IRAQ/Kuwait/Afghanistan–it could also be across the country or the state next door in the US.

#2 Make sure his ASVAB score meets the score range for any selected MOS, if not, he’s not going to be very happy.

#3 Documentation: get it ALL in writing before he commits!  If a recruiter will not put what he says into writing, it’s not likely to “go that way.” 

#3a KEEP ALL DOCUMENTATION stored neatly together from Day 1 and for eternity afterwards–no joke.  Someone will need something along the way.  While much information is stored in computers, unless you have an original document, you would not  believe how screwed up things can and will get later down the road.

#3b If a recruiting bonus is offered – absolutely get it in writing.  This goes for initial recruitment, reenlistments, etc.  You have no recourse if it isn’t it writing.  Not everything told makes it into the computer systems.

#4 Do not walk out of there or sign on the final dotted line without being secure in the answers and information you have been given.  If a recruiter is pushing too hard–contact his/her commander and complain.  Also good for answering/clarifying questions you do not feel a recruiter has provided you honestly or fully clarified.

#5 As a spouse you have privileges and support systems in place through the military, as well.  Make sure you know what those are.  Many a spouse fumble about not knowing what is available to them.

#6 Make sure he brings any college transcripts/degrees with him.  If he speaks another language, let them know (extra $),

Take a list of your questions with you and don’t leave without answers 🙂 Hope that helps some!

Post # 5
Member
832 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2010

You have been given great advice. I wanted to chime in and say that once you talk to the recruiter, go home and talk about it. sleep on it, etc. ive had friends that went in & signed contracts the day of and it was awful! i completely agree with @glasshoppah’s 3b. The signing bonus can be pretty big but if it isnt in writing it doesn matter. Also, don’t let the recruiter promise you things. Recruiters really dont have the authority. I have an army wife friend and her husband’s recruiter told them that they would be stationed in Hawaii after he finishes training. She has now learned that the chances of that are slim to none. The recruiter really just wanted her husband to sign the papers.

Post # 6
Member
487 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2009 - Byodo-In Temple, Luau Reception

There honestly isn’t too much different between National Guard and Reserves. I think the main difference is that the National Guard is also under orders of the Governer (of that state) and are usually the first to be called for a state catastrophy (hurricane, flood, snow blizzard, etc.). ALL military is deployable, so if that seriously is a concern, the only way to avoid that is to not join any service branch. Depending on what job (MOS/AFSC) he decides to do will determine if/when and how often he’ll deploy. I’ve actually been VERY lucky and haven’t gone to the desert yet (and I’ve been in the guard for 8 years), but that’s not to say I won’t eventually. I can’t speak for the reserves since I’m in the guard, but I know that the guard is actually one of the most deployed services and I would imagine that the reserves are too. ejs4y8 and GlassHoppa gave AWESOME advice and facts.

Post # 8
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

OOO did you meet with the recruiter yesterday?

Post # 10
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Oh i’m glad it went well! Can i ask what the deal breaker is? Usually it’s the D-word…ya know, deployment =]

Post # 12
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Oh yeah, the officer training camp. Yup, you definitely need to do that. It’s not boot camp, but it’s like training school for officers. Darling Husband had to do that. It was pretty lame but he was stationed 30 min away so it wasn’t bad fo rus.

Yeah, not gonna lie–your story doesn’t surprise me and it’s probably the #1 reason people don’t join the military more oftne. It involves putting it first and your life second. It really is its own lifestyle. That’s pretty much how it works. You train, you go through deployment training, you get deployed, and your life gets moved around it, not the other way around.

And the wedding thing is why we put a 6 month buffer between his scheduled return for deployment–we knew he couldn’t get stop lossed that way.

And you have to request leave to go on vacation sometimes…like we have to know exactly when Drill dates are before we made vacation plans. They’re only done a few months in advance, too.

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