(Closed) Florist won’t sign a contract! What to do??

posted 10 years ago in Flowers
Post # 3
Member
48 posts
Newbee

            You should point out to her that a contract would protect both of you, not just her. To quote the judge on The People’s Court-we call people with no contract plaintiffs and defendants. If she’s this reluctant to give you a written agreement, I’d look for someone. else.

Post # 4
Member
601 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

she contacted a lawyer…..good grief.

I agree with nina, point out its to protect both parties and that you are not questioning her artistic abilities with the flowers, but to make sure you are both on the same page design wise and BUDGET wise.  Without a contract I would think it would be easy for her to surprise you with an invoice way off the estimate price.

I’d seek another florist…or at the least ask to speak with 3-5 of her last customers and ask them how they dealt with the "no contract" thing. 

Post # 5
Member
1246 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

Wow, that’s ridiculous. I can’t believe she responded that way — a contract protects you *and* her, and it seems naiive that she’d think otherwise.

Post # 6
Member
754 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2008

I agree with everyone else, I would find another florist, as painful as that might be.  I had a contract for every one of my vendors and everyone had the piece of mind.

Post # 7
Member
508 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

It’s difficult.  We’re in discussion with a very small, very local florist.  We’ve signed contracts with all of our other vendors, including our friend, who is our photographer.  I’m not certain that she will provide a contract, which I’m a bit uncomfortable with.  If your florist is as highly regarded and recommended as she says, then you just need to decide ifyou’re comfortable going forward with a contract.  One possibility would be to compromise and have a less formal contract or a signed quote instead of a full contract. 

Post # 8
Member
120 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

I agree with others and would look for another florist, it’s simply to protect yourself from anything that *may* happen.  Planning your wedding is stressful enough, so in any situation that you can safeguard somehow and have a written agreement on is helpful whereas this florist does not see that.

Post # 9
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

I’m with missm – and I think I might take that advice as well! Our "florist" is actually the owner of a flower farm and does all the work completely herself. Her work is beautiful, reasonably priced, and creative. She is exactly what I was looking for. However, she almost got scared when I asked about a contract. I said all the "right" things about contracts benefiting both sides, just wanting to get it in writing, etc., but she was really nervous, saying, "if something happens to me on the way there, I don’t have anyone else who can work for me, and I don’t want to lose my farm." It wasn’t a guilt trip… just really honest and earnest. I spoke later to the owner of our venue, who said that this woman is SO reliable and is just like that, and if I don’t feel comfortable with it I should find someone else… unfortunately, it would be about twice as expensive and not even close to what I’m looking for. So I decided to keep it quiet from my lawyer dad.

 

The one thing I do find really strange is that you did have to send her a deposit with no contract. Honestly, I think it was a bit of a mistake on your part to send the check with nothing in exchange, but I of course understand that you wanted her to hold the date. In my situation, I think our "flower lady" probably feels that by not signing a contract, she forfeits her right to ask for an initial deposit.

 

This, unfortunately, is one of the problems I’ve found dealing with local/smaller vendors (which all of my vendors are)… they’re often (certainly not always) much friendlier and more inclined to be easygoing about things like this. Of course, sometimes that generalization can be totally untrue. In some ways, it’s great, because I’ve become very friendly with my vendors. But when it gets too friendly, they might try to take advantage of you. Missm’s suggestion of getting a signed quote is, I think, a really good compromise. 

Post # 10
Member
41 posts
Newbee

How about using your husband or dad as the scapegoat?  Tell her that he insists on getting something signed and that if a contract makes her uncomfortable then a signed quote (per suggestions above) would be ok.

Post # 11
Member
471 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2008

linzerella,

This florist is being very nice about giving you back your deposit. It’s not too late to go looking for another florist now for your October wedding so PLEASE try. This has red X’s and "Stay away" all over it. Don’t do it without a contract. You have no recourse if anything were to go wrong..Do you want that risk? 

Post # 12
Member
60 posts
Worker bee

Did your contract have scary legal lingo in it? Maybe that’s what scared her away. As a compromise, maybe you can write a "plain English" contract? This would have the benefit of being understandable to her without having to pay a lawyer to review the contract…

It could be really simple and read something like this:

The Florist agree to provide flowers for Linzerella’s wedding. Here are the flowers that we agreed upon:

* this
* and that

In exchange, Linzerella will pay the amount of $x. 

Signed,

__________   ___________

The Florist       Linzerella

Post # 13
Member
1061 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2008

I totally agree with JCM9608.

Post # 14
Member
438 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2008

absolutely find another florist.  I don’t understand why she is so adamant against it.  99% of service providing businesses use contracts, why on earth would she not?  It seems rather sketchy….especially that her lawyer is advising her not to do it.  It means she is concerned with what happens if she doesn’t do what she is supposed to do according to the contract.  so if you have nothing in writing, she can simply not get your flowers, or charge you whatever she wants, etc.  I would be very wary of any vendor that didn’t have a contract.

Post # 15
Member
305 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2008

Ummm, I looked at 3 different florists, and none of them would work with contracts.  Maybe it is where I am located?  I don’t know that if this is a respected florist that you need one.

I know, everybody disagrees with me.  I just don’t get the "contracts for everything" idea.  When you put down your deposit, you are reserving them.  If something happens that day, no flowers ect, the contract would get you your money back, but you would still need a lawyer and possibly a court.  Why not just take them to small claims court at this point without a lawyer? 

Oh, well.  No contracts for florists, photographer, or venue (verbal contract), and my wedding went off without a hitch.

Post # 16
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

I think Candi1024 is right – it totally depends on the area. It’s (perhaps unfortunately) very normal for vendors in smaller towns with less of a wedding industry not to use contracts.

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