(Closed) Fonts, fonts, and more fonts…agh!

posted 9 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1990

OOoooh! Typography is my passion. I can hopefully be of assistance!

For reference, serif fonts have the little feet (think Times New Roman) and sans-serif font don’t (think Arial, Helvetica, etc).

Some rules to think about when working with fonts:

1. Script fonts are very pretty but very difficult to read when used for body copy (paragraphs, lines of text, etc). I would use script fonts for your names or the headline, whatever that may be. Keep script fonts to a minimum and you will actually accentuate their beauty. By using too much script you will actually make it look less attractive as the type will be illegible and make the design look cluttered. As such, its best to pair a script font with a complimentary serif or sans-serif font. Which of those to use depends on the script font you choose- if you use a hefty script like Buffet Script, I would pair it with a hefty font like Copperplate. Too much contrast in the weight will be overpowering and distracting. The best thing to do would be to play around with different combinations.

2. Never mix to different fonts of the same classification- don’t pair a script with another script, or a sans-serif with another sans-serif, for instance. The short explanation for this is that it clashes and looks wonky.

3. Palace is gorgeous but very thin, so keep that in mind for when you’re printing. It probably wouldn’t work well to print light text on a dark background, especially on an inkjet as it has a tendency to bleed. It depends on your brand of printer (Epsons bleed pretty bad on non-epson paper, something Epson did on purpose actually, grr) and also the type of paper. If you can manage to print using a laser printer you’ll be in great shape because toner has a tendency to bleed less than inkjet printers. Test it first on regular paper, and then test on one of your invitations before printing a whole batch.

4. Back to Palace- it’s thin, so I would pair it with a thin/light weight serif or sans serif font. In the example I made, I paired it with some fonts I thought would look nice, but also two that I think are too heavy- Copperplate and Rockwell. I had to pay for some of those fonts but there are plenty of free alternatives that are similar. For instance, Century Gothic is a geometric sans serif, and there are tons of free geometric sans serif fonts on dafont.com.

5. I would stick to just two fonts, and that includes font families- if you use a medium/book/regular font, and then use a bold variety, or an italic, think of that as your second font.

6. Sizing! I wouldn’t go below 9pt, but I wouldn’t go too big either. Making it too big can actually make it look crowded and thus LESS legible! I personally like to work in 9pt in my design work as I think anything bigger looks clunky, but it depends on the font and the amount of text.

7. Whitespace! Whitespace is your friend! Make sure you leave plenty of "unused" room in your design. It will not only look a lot better but it will be much easier to read.

These are just some guidelines to keep in mind when working. I’m a graphic designer so to me these rules are sacred, haha, but its good to experiment. Sometimes breaking the rules works if the result looks amazing! As far as which fonts to use, I suggest picking a few different serif and sans-serif fonts and playing around with it. Dafont.com is great because you preview the text before downloading, so I recommend taking advantage of it!

Please post your design here when you’re done. I can’t wait to see it!

Sorry for the long geeky post, but I love fonts.

[attachment=191409,15626]

Post # 4
Member
1022 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I absolutely fell in love with the Albemarle package that Mrs. Cupcake used in all  her paper products!

 

–And I’m planning on using it!   I’m a graphic designer, too, so I second pretty much everything arobb81 said!

Post # 5
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1990

I forgot to point out that the numbers in my example are not a part of the font name, I threw them in there so you could see how the numbers would look in that font!

 

I’ve seen Albemarle Swash but I haven’t seen it in a finished design, I will have to look up Mrs. Cupcake’s design!

Post # 6
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

Whoa! This is really, really great font advice! Now I feel more educated about picking fonts for my Save the Dates!! 🙂

Post # 7
Member
776 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Wow thats really great help on the fonts, I feel like a font idiot…..could you suggest a non script that would go well with Edwardian Script? I really like that one but I cant find anything good too compliment it.

Post # 8
Member
2680 posts
Sugar bee

I have a font question – I had someone print my shower invitations and my wedding programs using the Copperplate Gothic font.  It looked really nice – I tried to print something at home with it and it looks very pixelated and not smooth at all.  It is not my printer, it appears this way on the screen as well.  Is there another Copperplate font available that is smooth?

Post # 9
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1990

@ Lovespearls

Edwardian is another classic script font.  It has a bit more weight than Palace, a little less scroll work, so it will probably be more forgiving when you print it, and it will be more legible too.  I would pair it with something of medium/regular weight, or certain serif fonts in bold, BUT if you go with bold, I would make that bold font slightly smaller so it doesn’t visually compete with Edwardian.  I like Edwardian with Georgia, Fontin Sans, Century Gothic, Didot, Futura, and Caslon.

@ naangel55

It sounds like a program issue, not a font issue.  What did you use to design the shower invitations?  If you ever work in a bitmap based program like Photoshop, make sure you are working at high resolution, otherwise your images will definitely print and possibly even display in a pixelated manner.  If in Photoshop for instance, if you look under Image Size, there should be a number followed by the letters DPI.  Make sure you work at 300dpi, and the paper size should be at least at the size you will be printing, if not bigger.

If it is perhaps an issue with a corrupted font file (do any other fonts do that on your computer, or does Copperplate behave that way in a different program?) , you can download and install a new copy that you find online, but I would uninstall the old copy first.

Let me know what you are using to design your invites and I might be able to give you better help. [attachment=192186,15843]

Post # 10
Member
2680 posts
Sugar bee

I use it in Word, maybe thats the problem.  When I have used that font, and others in Paint Shop Pro, it comes out a little blurry..

Post # 11
Member
776 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Thank you arobb81!!

Post # 14
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1990

I am so glad to be of service!  I love typography! 

You can definitely play around with Microsoft Word or Microsoft Publisher!  Its a good solution for beginners, but a good graphics program is invaluable for typesetting.  Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop are good, but very expensive.  You can try less expensive options like Adobe Photoshop Elements, or you can download a trial version of the software I mentioned.  There are also free graphics programs out there like Gimp.  However, these programs are a LOT more advanced than Microsoft Word or Publisher, which is meant to cater to non-professionals and is a lot more user friendly.  Microsoft Word has the benefits of doing a lot of the thinking for you- you don’t have to worry about the resolution of the document, etc.  Unfortunately you have few options as to customization but invitations can be pretty straightforward.  I’ve never used it for design purposes so I can’t speak too much about it, but definitely play around with it, it should be fine.

Now, on to your fonts!

Fontin can be downloaded for free from Exljbris, a fantastic type foundry: http://www.josbuivenga.demon.nl/fontinsans.html

Some of these fonts have to be purchased, but dafont.com has some really nice free fonts that you can try that are very similar.

A good replacement for Century Gothic could be Geo Sans Light.

A good replacement for Adobe Calson Pro could be Day Roman.

A good (enough) replacement for Didot could be Justus.

Also, the Top 100 on Dafont is a good place to find nice fonts.  You can also google the font names and see if you can find anywhere else to download them online, but keep in mind that pirating/stealing fonts is not only wrong but can also lead to viruses on your computer from less than reputable sites.  I don’t recommend it.  I can understand not wanting to pay for fonts if you’re only going to use them once, which is why I recommend dafont.com.

Post # 15
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I think this thread is such a great resource for font advice, I asked mr bee to sticky it to the top of the folder!!

Post # 16
Member
99 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Oooh. You all are going to be sorry you offered any advice!

I have a question:

I really, really love the style of this ad:

[attachment=214850,20919]

 

It uses "Missionary" font in the background

http://www.fontshop.com/fonts/singles/emigre/missionary/&sample_text=SB&sample_size=388)

Sorry for the ugly link, for some reason I’m having a hard time with the link function today…

 

And "Fling" in the foreground.

http://www.fontshop.com/search/?q=fling

 

I really like the style of the invite, and would love to put this design, with our initials (A & J) and our names on the back, and all of the invite information (printed in fling) on the front. 

 

My problem, though, is that I don’t like the "A" character in Missionary… Is there another light & airy whimsical font like this that, with flourish type accents and all, that would be a good replacement? 

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