(Closed) Formula Feeding Tips

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 17
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@chicagowife:  @MsMamaBear:  My favorite part of feeding Addie was the moment she felt full and warm enough to look “milk drunk.”  Ah, so cute! 

Post # 18
Member
536 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2007

Can I ask a question about poop? We’ve recently switched my almost-7-months-old DS to formula, and OH MY GOD the poop. It is constant, and gross. Seriously, this kid went from pooping once every few days to pooping constantly. My mom told me that she always thought formula had the opposite effect (pooping less often). Is this normal? Also, it kind of seems like DS is fussier about feeding than he was when he was just getting breastmilk. I’m wondering if we should try a different kind of formula… for those of you who tried a few, how long did you keep your baby on one kind to determine whether or not it worked?

Post # 19
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@Lozza:  Hmmm, constipation is a pretty common problem with formula feeding, but if his body isn’t reacting well to that formula, it may cause lots of stinky diapers…  Of course, it could just be a coincidence, and something else could be going on.  Addie always had way more (and way stinkier!) poop while she was teething, and sometimes she wouldn’t want to eat if her teeth hurt, too.  I would give the new formula at least a couple weeks, and if he’s still having these issues, ask your doctor what he/she recommends.  Most doctors will tell you to switch to a soy formula, if it seems like your baby is having issues tolerating regular milk formula.

Post # 20
Member
3586 posts
Sugar bee

@Mrs. Spring: I love that look. She also likes to smack her lips when she finishes, like ‘MMMmmm! Good!’ lol

@Lozza: we tried two and left her on it for a week to see any changes.

Post # 21
Member
2201 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Question for those who didn’t breastfeed at all – what impact did that have on your body? I’m not planning to breastfeed and just want to prepare myself for what that’s going to feel like, before and after pregnancy.

Thanks!

Post # 22
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@Goldilocks1107:  What exactly are looking for comments on?  Boobs?  Weight loss?  Something else?

Post # 23
Member
2201 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Mrs. Spring: Boobs, leaking, pain as the milk supply dries up. The gamut of “awesomeness” I can expect.

Post # 24
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@Goldilocks1107:  Lol, well, as far as I can tell, it’s a similar process to what you’d expect with breastfeeding, except sooner after birth.  I breastfed and nursed for about 2.5 weeks with my first, but with this one, I’ll start formula feeding in the hospital.

Basically, within in the first few days after birth, your milk will come in.  Before that, you may leak a little bit, but you probably won’t see much of a difference in your breasts.  When your milk comes in, your breasts will get very large and hard; think of it like porn star boobs, lol.  It can be uncomfortable and even painful for a few days to a week before the milk starts drying up.  After the initial week or so, your breasts will start to shrink and the pain should subside.  You may still leak milk for a few months afterward, and your breasts may not go back completely to their prepregnancy size.

Some of the tips I used to help my milk dry up more quickly and to manage the discomfort:

  • Wear a tight-fitting sports bra or wrap your breasts tightly with an Ace bandage.  This will help support your breasts and it will keep the engorgement to a minimum.  Keep the bra/bandage on at all times; it’ll hurt to take it off and your breasts will become more engorged.
  • Warm water and warm showers feel really good, but be sure to limit the amount of time you allow the warm water to run over your breasts.  5-10 minutes is about the limit, as the warm water will stimulate your breasts to start leaking/producing more milk.
  • When the engorgement/discomfort is really bad, you can manually express a little bit of the milk (Google “manual expression”, and you’ll get a ton of hits).  Try not to do this unless you really need to, and only express enough milk to relieve the pain.  Expressing too much will encourage your body to produce more milk and will extend the process.
  • After birth, you may be on some pain killers for a few days to a few weeks, depending on what kind of damage your body went through.  This will help with the breast pain, but you can also use cold cabbage leaves on your breasts to relieve some of the pain.  Just tuck a cold cabbage leaf in between your sports bra and breasts, and change it whenever it starts to get warm.
  • Finally, there are some herbs and some prescription medications that help dry up breast milk.  If you talk to your doctor about it ahead of time, you may have those available to you in the hospital, which would make the whole process a lot shorter and much more comfortable.

Post # 25
Member
2201 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Great advice – I already have some tight-fitting sports bras to use (since my boobs have gone up a cup size already and I haven’t upgraded to a sports bra that actually fits yet.

I wouldn’t have even thought about warm water being a stimulant for leaking/milk production – definitely good to know!

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