(Closed) freaking out – scared, frustrated, annoyed.. :( sorry, a bit long

posted 6 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

I would do two things:

1. Find a company like Mail Boxes Etc and get an address in South Carolina.  That will help with your job search. 

2. Search for a place to rent month-to-month in your area, and keep it as an option. Or, find friends who are willing to let you crash on their couch for a bit.  

 

Why are you moving to South Carolina?

Post # 4
Member
5761 posts
Bee Keeper

I’d stay put as long as one of you has an income guaranteed for right now. Find a sublet somewhere as soon as you can and wait it out.

You may have to delay your move for awhile, but take it from someone who moved from NJ to Colorado on a wing and a prayer, it always gets harder before it gets easier. We blew through $10,000. in less than 3 months (20+ years ago) between security deposits for a rental and deposits for everything else,plus basic living expenses. It took us months to find jobs and even those paid 1/3 of what we made living East.

Post # 5
Member
2907 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I know I commented on your last thread with my horror story of a colleague who moved, anticipating an easier time finding a job, and hasn’t found anything in a year, but I think it must be said: leaving a steady job in this legal job market right now to move to a place where you have no connections – or not enough to get you a job right away – is a very bad idea. The legal job market is contracting, but law schools keep pumping out 50,000 new law grads every year regardless. That means more people competing for fewer jobs, and even very qualified lawyers are having a tough time finding new employment. It’s not just my friend – I know a lot of lawyers who are really qualified, went to top 10 law schools, have years of great courtroom experience and have not been able to find jobs in new markets. (Especially when they’re competing with law grads who probably went to school locally and made connections through clinics, internships, professional associations and so on.)

If I were you, I would take a really close look at lawyer unemployment statistics before deciding what to do, and not just the figures that say only 2% of lawyers are unemployed. Look at the stats for the class of 2010 – something like 11% were still unemployed nine months after graduation, and plenty of that 89% were not employed in the legal field, which means they might be babysitters or working at McDonald’s to make the minimum payments on their giant student loans. (In fact, only 68% of the 2010 law grads were employed in a job which required bar admission.)

Which brings me to my next point – assuming you have student loans, have you thought about what you’re going to do with them if you can’t find a job right away? Forbearance is always an option, but then your interest compounds like crazy and you’re even further away from paying them off than ever – and from reading your other posts, it sounds like in your current job, you’re eligible for public interest repayment assistance. That’s a LOT to give up. For me, it’s the difference between paying off my loans in 10 years and paying off my loans about the time I’m ready to retire. 

I totally understand the desire to leave New York – hell, I want to leave New York! But I wouldn’t do it right now, as a lawyer, without another job lined up. So these are my (basically unsolicited) pieces of advice:

1. Find someone in SC who will tell you straight up what the legal job market is like down there right now. Call bar associations or the women’s bar association, any niche you’ve got. Ask for someone who would be willing to sit down with you over the phone and tell you what your realistic odds are of finding a job there. And use it as an opportunity to network, while you’re at it! 

2. Stay put in NYC til you find a job. Ask your friends and colleagues if they know anyone with a basement apartment to rent month to month. Look on Craigslist for short-term sublets. 

3. At the very least, if you’re going to move without a job lined up, don’t do it until you’ve saved enough for moving expenses *both ways* just in case, a plan for your student loan payments and enough in savings to last you six months.

I’m wishing you lots of luck despite my pessimism!

Post # 7
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

Hey!  I am a teacher, and I “wasted” two years of payment before I was told about the Federal Direct loan consolidation. They keep that shit under wraps! 

It sounds like maybe you have not explored ALL of your options for employment because of your desire to remain in public service.  Maybe expand a little, see what you can find…?

I assume it’s cheaper to live in SC than it is to live in NYC. Am I right?  Could your fiance find a job that would support you both while you are still looking?  Could you live with your friend in SC? 

 

Post # 9
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

@futuremrsk18:  Honestly…I would just move. You need an address, you WANT to move, you’re in a position where NOT moving will be more difficult in a few weeks.

I moved from Philadelphia to Harrisburg last summer, and I rented a one-way Uhaul.  It was far cheaper than a Pod, which I also looked into.  How much furniture do you have that is irreplaceable?   You can rent a 17′ Uhaul for $1300ish, picking it up in NYC and dropping it off in Charleston. 

 

AND YES PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU WANT TO SUE THE GOVERNMENT ABOUT OUR PUBLIC SERVICE!!!!!

Post # 10
Member
2907 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@futuremrsk18:  I wasted a bunch of years, too… so it wasn’t just you! We all thought IBR under any lender qualified, but turns out it’s only Federal Direct. SO crappy! (Also, have you looked into the John R Justice program through NYS? I’ve been getting some repayment assistance through them in the meantime.) 

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