(Closed) From Wedding to Pet

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
8042 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

@howtobeawife:  This is totally normal. A pet is actually excellent practice for a baby. I think puppies are worse than newborns πŸ™‚

Post # 4
Member
9074 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

I think it sounds pretty normal. I will pipe in that you might want to adopt as opposed to a breeder. Shelter dogs have a timer on their life, and they need a home, too.

Post # 5
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Pretty normal but please don’t get a puppy from a breeder, get a rescue!

Post # 6
Hostess
11168 posts
Sugar Beekeeper

@howtobeawife:  Totally makes sense. Not only are you dealing with the in between of married and TTC but you are coming off of the “wedding planning” craze. I went into a pretty crazy depression after the wedding and a lot of other bees dealt with similar things as well.

I would like to suggest that you continue to research but don’t agree to anything until things are calm. Between the wedding and the holidays your emotions are probably in high gear. Keep the thought in mind but make sure it is really what you want. We just adopted a rescue and it has been tough (but worth it absolutely) and we now have three!

Also, I would like to insert my two cents and suggest rescuing a puppy versus a breeder. No guilt trip…just a suggestion. πŸ™‚

 

Best of luck!

Post # 7
Member
1328 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I get totally into whatever I’m doing, a little obsessive.  So I can relate.  When we were getting out second dog this summer I was on the shelters website like every day for months (we couldn’t actually get the dog until we moved to the new apartment).  I kept checking for dogs that might fit out household, looking over their adoption process, etc.  I think that’s pretty common.  Nothing wrong with planning ahead.

Post # 10
Member
1297 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I stalk Petfinder as a hobby, even though we really can’t take another dog right now… so no, I don’t think you are weird. πŸ™‚

I’ll weigh in on the shelter/breeder thing. First off, yes, you can find just about anything you want in the shelter/rescue system if you are diligent and look long enough. However, if you go with a breeder, please support an excellent one. There’s a thread on these issues here: http://boards.weddingbee.com/topic/adopting-vs-buying-and-how-to-tell-if-your-breeder-is-responsible

If everyone that got a pet got it ONLY from an excellent breeder that did socialization, genetic issue management, and required owners to return the pet to them if there were any problems, there would be no need for animal shelters.

ETA: My rescue heeler is fine with kids! He ignores little kids and loves to play with any kids over elementary age. Of the dogs I know, I can’t think of a difference between puppies from breeders and shelter/rescue dogs in regards to kid friendliness.

Post # 11
Hostess
11168 posts
Sugar Beekeeper

@howtobeawife:  A shelter dog versus a shelter puppy are two different things. As you said you were looking to get a puppy (so I assume an older dog is not considered) this would allow you to encourage the appropriate behaviors towards children as the dog grows.

Going into a shelter changes a dog a great deal. As I said we just rescued a dog (5 years old) and are dealing with behavior issues that are a direct result of the shelter and change. For a puppy the exposure and changes wouldn’t be a severe.

Also there is NO guarantee that a puppy mill puppy will be accepting of children either. You can never guarantee a dog’s disposition but you can correct it with proper training.

Post # 12
Member
9074 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

@howtobeawife:  I get that. But just because you have a bred dog doesn’t mean it will be okay with kids.

Definitely do whatever your heart speaks to you, and do what’s best for you and your family. But nothing is guarenteed. My dog is a black lab (shelter dog) and I adopted him when he was 2 months old. Been through 25+ training classes, a certified service dog & passed his Canine Good Citizen test in one go. He is great with kids, other dogs, and other pets, but recently (within the past year) acted out against another dog.

Just know that nothing is promised. I’d hate for you to get your hopes up about a bred dog being perfect for your children and have it act out/show aggression. Regardless of where you get the dog, regardless of how well you train it and regardless of the temperment, every dog has the ability to act out against other pets, children or adults.

ETA: Just so I don’t get jumped: I’m not going to tell you you’re wrong or that I disapprove of what you’re doing (or going to do). If a breeder dog is right for you, then do that. If a shelter dog is right for you… do that. Whatever is best for your family.

Post # 13
Hostess
11168 posts
Sugar Beekeeper

@howtobeawife:  I have a feeling that our rescue dog will be nice to everyone once he is feeling back to his old self and comfortable in the new surroundings. As so many bees have reminded me rescue dogs (not necessarily puppies) need time to adjust. That being said again if you are considering a rescue puppy (say less than a year) you won’t face as many issues. It is the same as rehoming a toddler versus say a 12 year old. Obviously the 12 year old will react differently as he has more recollection of how things used to be versus the toddler.

Of the three of our dogs I believe that our rescue pup and our female will both be fabulous with kids. Our other male (puppy mill purchased by my mother and I took him from her when she was unable to care for him) dislikes how quickly kids move but we have corrected his behaviors. None of them would ever harm a child. Just because a dog isn’t a fan of children doesn’t mean they can’t necessarily be around them…just like people. πŸ˜‰

Post # 14
Member
996 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

If you are looking for a puppy, check shelters! Puppies are generally always good with children, unless they are a “Toy” breed. Please don’t get a toy breed if you have small children because they can and often do hurt the animal because they don’t realize how fragile and itty bitty they are. I adopted a pitbull puppy from the pound and he actually prefers children to adults lol. He will actually wake up my younger cousins when they stay over on the weekend by creeping up to their beds and leaving a toy RIGHT by their face. He will continue to stare and wag his tail until they get up and throw it lol.

In my experience I’ve always felt like shelter dogs/puppies know they could be facing death and because of that they just have this loving and thankful personality for the rest of their lives because of that. Either way, just maybe browse a few shelters and see if they have any puppies that would fit into your household & personality!

Post # 16
Member
8281 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

It’s not totally unreasonable to contact a reputable breeder now about a puppy for spring. The really good ones will almost always have a waiting list before a bitch is bred, so it’s not a bad idea to get your name on there!

 

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