Frustrated with my dog, stressed out, yelling

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
7587 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2010

OMG! We were having the same problems! I started to freak out and Darling Husband and I have been talking about getting rid of her.  However, I started googling things and found out that the peeing in the house might be from bladder stones. We had her x-ray’d and found out that she has these and there are things to prevent it. You might want to have it checked.

As for the other stuff I have no solutions. I do feel your pain and I know how frustrating this can be. I’m so sorry.

Post # 4
Member
7291 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

Hash she been checked out for health problems ( like hard core blood tests /scans)?

What age was she when you got her and where did you get her from?

The dog is getting worse do to your reaction  energy of frustration , anger and anxiety.

She needs some serious exercise and rules, boundaries and limitations.

i’m so sorry you are feeling this way and going through this , but I do believe there is hope. I know she is a little dog, but she is still dog and will need a lot of exercise and time to ensure the bathroom problem gets fixed ( unless of course this is medical like a UTI or neurological issue)

Post # 5
Member
1474 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

This could make your problems doubly bad or could help them, but what about getting another pet so she isn’t alone? Then they can be attached to each other?

Or call the dog whisperer?

Post # 6
Member
3520 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

I hate to say it, but it might be time to let her go.  Imagine how happy she would be with a family who was always home, or someone with a big yard.  Her behavior seems to be taking over your entire life.  (((hug))) I’m sorry you’re going through this.  Maybe you should talk to someone with a Pomeranian rescue organization and see how easy it would be to place her somewhere better suited to her.

Post # 7
Member
7291 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

@thehoneybear: I second the dog whisperer- If you haven’t watched his show, I highly recommend obtaining the dvds or youtube videos. I’ve seen several really good sever anxiety episodes and you would be surprised how fast things can turn around with some commitment. 

Post # 8
Member
1160 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

How many hours a day are you walking and training her?

 

Apart from your dog walker (I am also a dog walker) your dog should be getting a GOOD walk each morning (1/2 to one hour)that includes obedience training,and one in the evening. She should not be allowed on furniture or on your bed.

I do not even allow dogs in my kitchen.

Does she have her own spot? (crate?) She should be in there when you aren’t at home and left with a kong or other puzzle toy.

Soiling your home and demand barking, etc. means the dogs needs aren’t being met somehow. You just need to figure out what that is.

She also needs a full medical exam, as the increased eating and drinking could mean a thyroid issue or diabetes. She may also have a bladder infection.

 

 

Post # 9
Member
558 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2015 - Thorpewood

My boyfriend has a cat who would eat a lot, drink a lot, and pee in the house.  They found out he had a major thyroid problem.  Now he gets medicine every day (three times a day, actually) and things have gotten better for the most part.

As for the separation anxiety, I third calling the Dog Whisperer or maybe getting another dog.  Or, if you absolutely don’t want to do that (and I could easily understand why), maybe you should get rid of her.

Post # 10
Member
1160 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Post # 11
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

I’d definitely go to a vet to see about the peeing thing. That’s not normal and sounds medical. As for the separation anxiety… that’s a common problem with Poms. They’re a high strung super social breed. Something like doggy daycare would probably be better than just dog walking. Maybe you could find someone local who is home during the day to watch her? 

I don’t know… usually I’m never an advocate of giving dogs up but it kind of sounds like your lifestyle just doesn’t fit with having a dog. If you work a full time job and like to go out at night… you probably just shouldn’t have a dog. They’re social creatures, they need more interaction than that. Please don’t give her up to a shelter though. At least find a breed-specific rescue to take her in and place her with a family that has enough time for her. 

Post # 13
Member
7291 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

Can the crate be made a positive place with food and perhaps a towel or sheet over the top to limit her space and cause her brain to chill out? Make it like a game and a reward to go be in it? Feed her meals in it, etc.

Sorry If you already have done these things, but I know it helps for some.

I second the doggy daycare for interaction and companionship both human and dog!

Post # 15
Member
558 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2015 - Thorpewood

@maggierose: I totally understand.  Maybe getting another dog would be a bad idea because this new dog could pick up on your current dog’s bad behavior.  Then you would have two badly behaved dogs.

Post # 16
Member
195 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

How long ago did you bring her to the vet that they couldn’t find anything wrong with her?  Have you had her brought to the vet lately?  While it is possible she is learning new bad behaviors left and right, it is also possible she has some health issues that are causing her behaviors.  We had a dog that started having accidents who was potty trained and then would stop and it would go away then a month later would start doing it again.  Turns out it was because she gets bladder infections, so aside from taking her to the vet regularly, when she has accidents we know she needs to be seen.  I think the bathroom problems are a sign something is up.  Especially if it is waking her up at night.  It could be causing her to want different food too because her stomach could be off or she just feels off in general and doesn’t know what to ask for to feel better. Maybe try a different vet?  How frustrated you must feel.  . 🙁

In terms of the separation anxiety that is harder to crack.  It is great you have invested time into trying to go to training with her and give it a shot.  But maybe she needs more attention than you are able to give her.  I think I would first take her to the vet and have them check her out and see if she is having problems in other areas that could be addressed.  If not, maybe consider re-homing her.  Just make sure to maybe work with a rescue and say you will let her live with you till she gets placed.  They will screen everyone to make sure that the dog will be going to the right home and not end up having to be re-homed again and again or abused.   When my mother passed away I had to re-home a few of her dogs (She had four and I couldn’t keep them all sadly) and it was really hard but I worked with a rescue to make sure the people adopting the different pups knew the dog and all about their personalities and what she needed, and that they had experience with dogs.  All the dogs are in wonderful homes and I get pictures all the time.. it is nice to see them get the attention and love they deserve. 

 Here are some things I found online to maybe discuss with your vet. . 

“A dog who starts drinking water like a fish could be developing diabetes or kidney disease. You may not be able to notice the dog’s extra water consumption easily, but you should be able to pick up her increased intake by paying careful attention to what comes out the other end. She’ll be producing much larger amounts of urine and have to go outside more often. She may also start having accidents in the house.”

This article was also interesting (lists possible disorders):

http://www.vetinfo.com/ddrinkandurin.html

 
If you are really determined to not re-home her maybe you can try to at least make the situation a little easier to deal with.  Could you get a friend to help you and let the dog out even once a week? One less day to pay for a person to let the dog out.  Could you get her litter trained and then keep her in a little gated area (maybe the kitchen) so that she doesn’t need to have someone let her out? (She is 5 so teaching her to do this could be hard but may help.)  Could you keep a tv on to maybe distract her or calm her down while you are gone?  Sorry if some of these are dumb suggestions, sometimes the strangest things will work.  I really do think that there is something else going on in terms of the accidents though.  I would be aggressive with the vets . .  

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