(Closed) G or H color diamond yellow??

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 32
Member
1081 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

I think it depends on how sensitive you are to color. In bad lighting, my F color show a tiny grey/yellow. However, I notice my centre stone look bright white when I wear it as a set. My wedding band is half eternity F color, when wearing both at the same time… for some odd reason, it enhance the my center stone A LOT. It looks so much bigger and whiter….even in bad lighting. 

My is 1.02 carat, when wearing them together, the centre stone appear to be whiter and look bigger.. it looks more like 1.2 to 1.3 when it pair with the wedding band. 

Post # 33
Member
55 posts
Worker bee

H is white, you won’t be able to tell the difference, you could probably even go to I. I have an H, and it’s white. If you go onto Pricescope, the experts on that board will tell you the same. 😀

 

Post # 34
Member
94 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

 

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Supersleuth:  I always follow your posts because you seem so knowledgable. What are your thoughts on VS vs. SI1 clarity stones? Is VS worth the extra $$?

Post # 35
Member
86 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

Mine’s a G color, and I’ve only seen warmth in it in kitchen/bathroom lighting. It’s really bright white! 

 

Post # 36
Member
252 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2015 - Family Farm and hall -- small town

Mine ring is color H, clarity VS1 from Tiffany’s. I don’t notice the diamond ever being yellow. 

Post # 37
Member
3 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: September 2013

There’s a useful diamond color comparison chart here which list different color grades side by side. I think it should help give you better ideas on what to expect.

Post # 38
Member
3018 posts
Sugar bee

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cranraspberry:  The pictures are from the side against a white background and the stones are not set.  You won’t see these colour differences once a stone is set in a ring.

Post # 39
Member
3018 posts
Sugar bee

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dar7: 

Hi Dar7,

 

I’m not really knowledgeable but I like to think that things have to make sense.

A while ago I tried an experiment.  I was trying to see whether yellow gold settings actually made my G VS1 AGS triple ex round brilliant diamond look yellow.  I compared the diamond with cubic zirconia, which are D colour (colourless) , set in a silver earring and took photographs.  I tried to be as fair as possible and so I did the experiment in natural light on a cloudy day. and kept away from any brightly coloured objects.  I couldn’t hold the jewellery any further from myself than arm’s length but I held the jewellery in such a way that the diamond and cubic zirconia were equally likely to be affected by the colour of my clothing.

I found two things:

1.  The yellow gold prongs didn’t affect the colour of the diamond except for a tiny reflection just by the prongs.  This reflection could be seen under magnification but under normal viewing would be smaller than the resolution of the human eye.*

2.  Much to my surprise I couldn’t see any colour difference between the G coloured diamond and the D coloured cubic zirconia. 

Of course, just because I personally couldn’t see a difference didn’t mean that other people wouldn’t be able to see a difference.  So the next thing that I did was to take the photograph and accentuate the colour so that any colour differences would become apparent.  Again I couldn’t see any difference.

So what do I conclude?  When set there is no difference in colour between an excellent cut round brilliant that is G in colour and a colourless cubic zirconium.  Therefore to all intents and purposes when a G coloured diamond is set and viewed from above it is to all intents and purposes colourless.

*Please note that I can only say that this is true of excellent cut round brilliants in a prong setting where the prongs are below the level of the table.  Results may be different for different shapes, different settings or larger prongs.

Post # 40
Member
3035 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015 - Walnut Hill Bed & Breakfast

Mine is a G, it’s very white. 

Post # 41
Member
94 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

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Supersleuth:  thanks for the great info! And thoughts on clarity? I see likee you are lucky enough to have a VS1 but I often wonder if I should have saved money by going SI1. It’s hard though because my diamonds is do crystal clear! As is yours I see!

Post # 42
Member
3018 posts
Sugar bee

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dar7:  

Clarity is a little more complicated.  I chose a VS1 because I was fairly nervous of buying online.  Here in the UK the diamonds in high street jewellers are often poor quality.  Living in Scotland I didn’t have access to London jewellers or the Birmingham Diamond Quarter and no one I knew had bought online.  In addition I had also had a bad experience with Blue Nile.  Blue Nile sell diamonds at reasonable prices but are ‘ship drop’ diamond merchants.  This means that they grade diamonds depending on certification and cut angles (depth, table percentage etc.) but they don’t actually see the diamonds.  The diamonds are in vaults around the world but are on the Blue Nile database.  Certification and cut angles etc are a really good guide and increase the likelyhood of obtaining a great diamond but are not a guarantee of a great diamond.  Unfortunately the diamond I received was really sparkly around the edges but dull and dark in the middle due to lack of internal symmetry.

So I tried Whiteflash instead because the company also had gemologists who would examine the stones.  I would have been okay with an H VS2 but at the time they didn’t have any in stock so I went for G VS1 instead.  I have to say that although the received wisdom is that you should be able to see flaws under x10 magnification I have tried and I can’t see any flaws at all.

If I had to advise someone knowing what I now know I would suggest that people go for ‘eyeclean’ which means that you simply cannot see the flaws under normal viewing.  This might be VS1, VS2, S1 or S2 depending on type of flaw, position of flaw and cut of stone.

I believe that white flaws (feathers, crystal misalignment) don’t show up as much as black dots (specks of carbon).

A flaw near the edge (providing it isn’t actually at the edge and likely to cause structural problems in the stone) is going to be less obtrusive than one right in the middle of the table.  In addition such a flaw, even if visible, could be covered by a prong so that it isn’t visible.

In general, cuts with lots of facets such as a round brilliant cut don’t show flaws as easily as ones with fewer facets such as an emerald cut.

So, have you and I wasted money in choosing a diamond with a higher clarity.  Well the answer is possibly yes and possibly no.

With an astute gemologist on board we could have chosen a cheaper stone, an S2 and maybe even an I1, where the flaws were of a particular type and position in a cut with lots of facets so that they were not visible under the naked eye.  The diamond would look just as clear as a IF diamond.

In addition, who says that flaws are a bad thing?  The answer is the diamond industry.  I have to say that perfection is over-rated.  Maybe a pretty stone with a feather pattern at the edge is prettier than a pretty stone without it?  

However, maybe you have got the right stone for you.  I’ve heard on this site and others of people upgrading their stone in terms of size, colour, clarity and even cut, and then quickly realising that they preferred their original stone.  Why does this happen?

While high street jewellers try to bamboozle their customers into thinking that colour and clarity are all important, online jewellers try to bamboozle their customers into thinking that all excellent cut diamonds (and even all excellent cut H&A diamonds) look the same.  Well the truth is that they don’t.  Tiny changes in cut angle (hundredths of a degree) change the facet and sparkle pattern, just like a small change can dramatically alter a kaleidoscope pattern.

So if you like, or even love, your diamond you haven’t wasted your money.  Diamonds are a poor financial investment and are only crystallised carbon.  But their worth is in the amount of pleasure that they give you.  You may well have hit lucky and have the most beautiful diamond in the world on your finger.  So don’t worry about cost or value for money or whether or not you have got a good deal.  Just thoroughly enjoy your diamond.

 

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 8 months ago by  .
Post # 43
Member
94 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

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Supersleuth:  such good stuff, thank you!

Post # 44
Member
73 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

My heirloom ring is H VVS2 1.0 carat, plus a G  S1 .25 carat and honestly, I think only a jeweler could tell the difference with a naked eye between G or H and I’d be happy with anything in that range.

Post # 45
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

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heathuhhhhweeee:  how many carats? It’s gorgeous 

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