(Closed) Genetic Testing?

posted 8 years ago in Jewish
Post # 3
Member
3162 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I don’t know anything about the cost but the purpose is to find out if the Jewish parents is a carrier for Tay-Sachs Disease. My OBGYN told me the same thing (my Fiance is Jewish). Can anyone who has done the testing chime in?

Post # 4
Member
1763 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

I am not Jewish, but I believe they are done because the Jewish popluation is at an increase risk for Tay-Sachs and cystic fibrosis. I would ask your doctor if you need to have them done since you only have one Jewish parent.

Most insurance companies don’t pay for these unless there is a strong family history of the diseases. That is why they cost so much.

Edit:And it is just a simple blood test I believe.

Post # 5
Member
3564 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

My sister had that done before she had kids. I don’t remember the cost. As to whether it’s necessary, I think it’s dependent on the ethnic background of you and your Fiance. I  think it’s Ashkenazi Jews who tend to carry the gene. I’m definitely planning on getting tested. My Fiance and I are both Jewish, and I want to avoid any possibility of conceiving a baby who has Tay-Sachs. If you both have the gene, then they can do pre-implantation genetic testing on the embryo to see if it has TS.

Here’s a website with some more info: http://www.mazornet.com/genetics/tay-sachs.htm

Post # 6
Member
1237 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I thought that the testing would be on the fetus after it has been conceived? I mean, I assume you could also test the potential parents but even if a parent is a carrier, it’s only a 50% chance that the child could get it (at least for Tay-Sachs). I don’t have experience with this since I’m not Jewish, but my boyfriend is (Sephardic, not Ashkenazi), all my knowledge comes from learning about genetics in college.

Post # 7
Member
3162 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

No they don’t test the fetus! There would be no point in that. They test the Jewish parent or parents so that you know the risk/odds before you try to conceive.

Post # 8
Member
3564 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Well, they can test embroys. If you and your Fiance both have the gene, they can test embryos and then if the embryo has Tay Sachs (has both recessive genes from the mom and the dad), you can choose to not have it implanted (obviously this means that you wouldn’t be getting pregnant the old fashioned way, but would be doing it in a lab). I’m sure people have different views on that, but if my Fiance and I both have the TS gene, then I am for sure testing the embryos before they’re implanted.

Post # 9
Member
3162 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

OK now I’m confused because that link Hilsy posted says that you only need testing if both parents are at risk for being carriers. I’m not jewish, french-canadian, or creole, so then why the ef did my OBGYN tell me that Fiance should be tested?

Post # 10
Member
3564 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Hmm, @kittyachi: I’m not sure why he would NEED to be tested if there’s no way you would have the gene, because then it would be impossible for your kids to have TS. Maybe she just wants him to get tested so he knows one way or the other whether he’s a carrier?

Post # 11
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

You can test the parents for the risks of conceiving a baby with TS, or you can do fetal testing early in pregnancy to find out your risks of that particular fetus carrying TS.  I really know nothing about genetic testing of the parents, but the fetal testing is offered to everyone in early pregnancy, typically covered by insurance companies, and is pretty cheap. 

Post # 12
Member
283 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Jewish populations are at higher risk of Tay-Sachs, but not higher cysitc fibrosis (correction to above).  That said, having the test done will give you piece of mind if he’s not a carrier, but may just stress you out more if you find out that he is.

I’m not a doc, but a biology major.  Here’s my take:
Tay sachs is called an autosomal recessive disease, which means that both parents have to contribute a gene for it, so if both parents carry then the odds of having an affected child are 1 in 4.  Because you (I’m assuming by the post) are not Jewish, the odds are incredibly low of you carrying a gene.  If only one parent is a carrier then you cannot have an affected child, but have a 50% chance of having children that are carriers.  So, since you almost undoubtedly are not a carrier, and the odds of your husband being a carrier are about 4% (http://www.genome.gov/10001220) I wouldn’t worry about it.

If you were also Jewish it might be worth having tests done.

I hope this gives you some peace of mind.

Post # 13
Member
3162 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Maybe my doc suggested it because if Fiance is a carrier, while the baby wouldn’t have T-S, it could be a carrier? I don’t know. Doesn’t seem worth it to me in that case.

I think it’s weird that insurance would cover the fetal testing once the baby is already conceived and potentially has the disease and not cover testing of potential parents for screening purposes. That is completely backwards IMO. I guess I just generally don’t understand fetal or embryonic testing for it if you can do testing before conception, but that is a different issue I think.

Post # 14
Member
311 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

My husband and I are both Ashkenazi.  I got tested for Tay Sachs and Cystic Fibrosis, but not any of the other diseases for which Ashkenazi Jews are at increased risk.  It was just a blood test and my insurance covered it.

Here’s a list of the diseases you can be screened for:

Tay-Sachs disease, Canavan disease, familial dysautonomia, Niemann-Pick (type A) disease, Fanconi anemia (group C), Bloom syndrome, Gaucher disease (the non-neuronopathic type), mucolipidosis type IV, and glycogen storage disease type 1. These are all uncommon conditions that are predominantly found in persons of Ashkenazi ancestry. [Tay-Sachs disease is also found in persons of French-Canadian (Acadian) ancestry and, rarely, in mixed Jewish/non Jewish couples.] Although not strictly a disorder of European Jews, cystic fibrosis is often included in an Ashkenazi heritage screening panel, since it occurs with the same frequency in European Jews as in members of the non-Jewish Caucasian population (approximately 1/3,000).

 

 

Post # 15
Member
6572 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2010

my rabbi told us that i should be tested because my husband and i are both ashkenazi jews. my doctor said that insurance wouldn’t cover it until i’m pregnant (which i think is very silly), but it wouldn’t stop us from ttc anyway because just b/c you’re a carrier doesn’t mean your child will automatically have the disease.

Post # 16
Member
599 posts
Busy bee

I did it at the NYU medical center in nyc and my insurance covered it completely. Also tons of discounts for students if you research it.

The topic ‘Genetic Testing?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors