(Closed) Gestational Diabetes Support

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
8461 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@PrncssDva:  My FI’s mom had it with both of her kids.  It’s a good indication that you’ll be at risk for type II diabetes later in life, so it’s a good early warning.  I think she had to keep track of her blood sugar and watch what she ate (more leafy greens, healthy protiens, etc).  This was also close to 40 years ago, but both of her boys are fairly healthy.  However, they both struggle with their weight (they were not born overweight) and easily gain extra pounds if they eat carelessly (i.e. lots of soda, eating before bed, etc).  She now has diabetes, but controls it with medication and doesn’t need shots.  I think your doctor will really be able to tell you more, but from what I understand it’s pretty standard and easy to manage.

Post # 4
Member
2401 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@PrncssDva:  “I don’t want a fat baby” First off, I don’t know how to take that statement. I know your scared but if she is healthy be happy. I have known many close friends with this and their babies did not come out “fat”. You will do what you have to for your baby to come out healthy and strong. Just watch what you eat.

Post # 6
Member
8461 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@PrncssDva:  It only became scary for her because she chose to ignore the warning (didn’t change her eating habits), and her children learned poor eating habits as a result.  She has now started to change her eating somewhat (she still eats sweets) and doesn’t have to take shots, but still has to take medicine (I think it’s a few pills each day).  I would definitely talk to your doctor about getting advice from a nutritionist so that you can change your eating habits now before the baby is born.  As long as you take care of yourself, you will have a healthy happy baby.

Post # 7
Member
154 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

@PrncssDva : Depending on how severe your diabetes is, you may not need to take shots. I would do some research online and try to start altering your diet. You will need to cut down on your carbs, but you should not need to cut out carbs completely. They will most likely give you a specific diet to follow.

Drink lots of water, no soda or sugary drinks.

One of my firends had diabetes with both of her children and they are healthy and fine now.

Post # 10
Member
4275 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I can imagine it is scary, but as long as you caught it in advance and are doing things to take care of it, then it should be fine. My mom gained 100 lbs and had GD with me…. I do not have diabetes and I am not overweight. I was 8 lbs when I was born which is healthy for a full term baby. Your doctor should tell you if it is severe enough to take insulin or if you just need to change your eating habits.

Post # 11
Member
1245 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I had gestational diabetes.  I did not have to go on insulin (“the shots”) and I was completely able to control it without any medication.  There are oral medications that are tried before insulin, and if you do have to go on insulin, it really isn’t that bad.  The needle is really short and you hardly feel it.

Anyway, my doctors were pretty strict.  I had to test my blood glucose 4 times a day and log it in a book.  As soon as I went in for my appointments they would make a copy of my book and the doctors would scrutinize it.  I also met with a dietitian on things I should and should not eat.  I found that small, frequent meals were the best and I totally craved protein.  I could feel if my blood glucose was starting to drop and if I needed to have a snack.  At first I was overwhelmed and scared when I was told I had GD, but it really wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be.

My daughter was a bigger baby, as that it one of the risks.  They also had to monitor her more closely than a baby born of a mom that does not have GD because the baby has a higher chance of having hypoglycemia (low blood suger) after birth because they are so used to the higher glucose levels in the womb.

She is older now, and I do say, she does struggle with her weight a bit. She’s not a fat kid but she is stockier than her petite super skinny friends.  But otherwise she is completely healthy.

Post # 14
Member
1766 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I was diagnosed with GD two weeks ago, and yes, it’s scary to hear this news!  I am now seeing my endocrinologist and feel much better about it since I feel like I have some control over what’s happening with my body.

First, I would try to find a specialist who can see you sooner.  Same thing happened to me.  The endo my OB told me to call couldn’t see me for another 3 weeks and I felt uncomfortacle going that long without taking care of the diabetes. I called my OB, explained the situation, got the name and number of a new doc, and got an appointment there the next day.

Both my OB and endo told me to “eat healthy and not restrict myself too much since baby needs nutrients”.  Gee, thanks for being so specific! I know, though, that a lot of ladies with GD are sent to see a dietician who will develop an individual diet plan. After I nudged him, my endo at least narrowed it down to no sugar, easy on the carbs (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), lots of protein and healthy fats.  Things I learned in my online research helped me put together my own plan. One thing you will definitely have to do is check your blood sugar 4 times a day; first thing in the morning, after breakfast, after lunch, and after dinner.  This way, you will see if what you eat is driving your numbers up or not.

Some advice for now:

Eat 3 small meals each day, and 4 snacks. One snack should be right before bedtime.  Eat some carbs with every meal, but much less that you might have before. Choose whole grains over white bread or pasta. Always eat carbs in combination with protein.  Try to eat your meals and snacks around the same time every day.  Never skip a meal or snack.

There are a lot of meal and snack suggestions for GD online.  Just google it to get some ideas.  Google “foods with low glycemic index”.  Those don’t drive up your blood sugar.  Once you have your blood sugar meter, write down what you ate along with your glucose number. This way you can see if your body reacts to certain foods with a spike in blood glucose (BG).  I, for example, had to cut out oatmeal even though it has a great glycemic index.

You can eat as many veggies as you like, except for corn, peas, and beans. The latter count as carbs.  Milk counts as a carb because of the lactose; experiment with what it does to your BG numbers.  Cheese is fine, have as much as you want.  Fruit is high in sugar, eat no more than 2 pieces a day.  Some fruit is better than others, e.g. apples yay, bananas nay.

Your body is more insulin resistant in the morning than later in the day.  Eat less carbs before lunch than later in the day.

When you limit your carbs, you cut out a lot of calories.  Make sure you are eating enough calories during the day.  Now is the time for full fat dairy and all the nuts, peanut butter and full-fat salad dressings that you want.

The further along you get in pregnancy, the more insulin resitant your body gets.  Your BG numbers will go up in time, no matter how well you manage your diet.  Being on insulin sucks, but it’s better than baby getting too much blood sugar from you. Your OB might monitor you more closely to check for the size of the baby and for any complications. 

Well managed gestational diabetes results in healthy babies that are not oversized. Take good care of yourself.  Most importantly, don’t blame yourself!  I don’t have any of the risk factors for GD other than being older than 25. You didn’t get this because of something you did or didn’t do.  Your hormones caused this. My endo thinks there was someone in my family with undiagnosed diabetes, because it seems to be mostly genetic.

Finally, two positive aspects: You will probably get at least one more ultrasound that you otherwise wouldn’t have gotten, yay!  Women with well managed GD usually gain less weight in pregnancy and get back to their pre-pregnancy weight faster than women who never got GD in the first place.

Good luck!

Post # 15
Member
1766 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@PrncssDva:  Testing for your own BG levels is really not a big deal once you get used to it.  The needle is so thin, I hardly feel the finger prick! Don’t worry, you can totally do it!

Post # 16
Member
1245 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@AprilJo2011:  Agree.  Testing is so simple.  The lancet is so small you hardly feel it.  I’ve had mosquito bites that felt worse that poking my finger with the lancet.

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