(Closed) Getting a new kitten while already having a male cat, questions!

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
698 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

This is just my opinion having introduced 10 cats now to each other …

We have one very aggressive cat that, like yours, will get aggressive with us.  We have some cats that have grown to be bigger than him and he DOES NOT LIKE THIS.  He gets so angry when the other ones are around and can be quite aggressive to them and us if we try to separate them, and we have a lot of experience with cats.  It’s slowly died down as he’s gotten older (he’s pushing 8 now) but it’s been a trying few years with new cats because of him.  That said, if you’re looking to introduce a cat, a small female cat would be your ideal combination … though I don’t recommend a kitten.

Depending on your cat’s activity levels it could go two ways – the kitten could annoy the older, aggressive cat and the cat could be aggressive toward the kitten for, well, being a kitten and wanting to play.  It could also play with the kitten or ignore it completely, but the likelihood of that from my experience is not very high.  We’ve introduced kittens (male and female), and fully grown cats and the very small 1-2 year old females have gone over the best with our big brute.

Looking at temperment is a huge help – ask the humane society or wherever you are getting your cat about the temperment of the female cat.  If it’s docile, much smaller, nice to humans and very submissive to other cats it might be okay.  Look for a cat that seems very, very friendly.

If you have further questions feel free! 🙂  This is all my opinion but I think that it’s pretty accurate given the number of cats we’ve introduced over the years.

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 11 months ago by  kayah.
Post # 5
Member
698 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

View original reply
_blackbird_:  Definitely when you move.  Taking your aggressive cat out of the territory it has already established would give the new cat the best chance, IMO.  Maybe establishing the new cat into certain rooms (that way the cat could have “it’s territory” if things go wrong) might be a good idea.  Another good idea might be getting a gate for a bit and dividing the house off, giving them different litters while you introduce them and slowly putting the litter into one so they can smell each other’s poop in the different boxes and get used to that (and I highly recommend a solid metal scoop.  Trust me.  It’s so worth it not to have it break and get poop on you).  We’ve been lucky and actually just put the cats in a room for a few days, slowly introduced them by expanding the area that the new cat can go, thereby letting them smell the other cat and making the older cat curious.  A gate for a big dog lets the cats come up to each other, sniff through the gate, get the hissing and potential bats out of their system, etc, without actually being able to leap over it and start a fight.  This controls the environment.  When they seem more curious you can let the gate out and watch them for a bit 🙂

 

Also, if your cat is still playful, a kitten might be fine.  Some cats are built differently and I’ve noticed different style of play for different cat build.  Since your cat seems to like doing the chase game, look for a cat that might be a bit thinner naturally (small shoulder span, not wide), have a longer tail or a cat that’s just not as “stocky”.  Our “stocky” cats prefer an ambush style play, where they like to jump out at the other cats and our “chase game” cats are all runners who do not like to be ambushed or wrestle after such a thing.  They prefer to run after each other around the house, taking turns trying to catch the other.  It’s completely different hunting (play) styles and it tends to clash and get some trouble going.

The topic ‘Getting a new kitten while already having a male cat, questions!’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors