(Closed) Give me your best puppy potty training advice!!

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
9139 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

Stay home for a week and get used to her “pee/poo” face and behavior.  It was the best thing I ever did.  Also when crate ttraining, take her directly outside when you take her out of the crate and don’t bring her back in until she does her business.  If she doesn’t do her business put her back in the crate for 15 minutes or more and then take her back outside.  We also picked up the water and only put it down during meal times.  She’ll figure out the door thing eventually.

Post # 5
Member
5147 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Consistency, consistency, consistency.And positive reinforcement. And a schedule.

Take the dog outside first thing in the morning. When you feed the dog, take it outside about 20 minutes later. Take it out before bedtime. And when it uses the bathroom outside, give it a treat.

Also take the dog out every hour or two during the day, to give it an opportunity to relieve itself.

If the dog uses the bathroom inside and you don’t catch it in the act, do nothing. (Well, clean up the mess, but do nothing to the dog.) The dog doesn’t understand why it is being punished after the fact, it has forgotten all about it’s mess on the floor by then.

If you catch the dog in the act, say “no!” or “unt-uh!”, and promptly take the dog outside. When it finishes using the bathroom outside, give it a treat.

You need to watch the dog constantly. Tie the leash to your belt-loop if you need to, so the dog is always by you. If you cannot be watching the dog for some reason, put it in it’s crate. A dog typically won’t soil it’s sleeping area. (Crate training is a wonderful tool when housebreaking a dog.)

And SKIP THE PEE-PADS! They confuse the dog and prolong the training process. Because the dog was taught “potty inside on this pad”, which isn’t what you want as an end result. Teach them to go outside from the get-go. And I’ve found that dogs that were trained on pee-pads never forget, years down the road, they may still pee on any papers that are left on the floor.

Post # 6
Member
334 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2013

We hung up bells (bought them in the pet section at Walmart) and made her paw touch the bells every single time we took her to potty. She didn’t get it for a while, but after several weeks-month she started hitting the bells every time she needed to go out.

Post # 7
Member
9139 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@abbyful:  “You need to watch the dog constantly. Tie the leash to your belt-loop if you need to, so the dog is always by you. If you cannot be watching the dog for some reason, put it in it’s crate. A dog typically won’t soil it’s sleeping area. (Crate training is a wonderful tool when housebreaking a dog.)”

This is why I took a week off form work and stayed home.  He never left my sight and even went into the bathroom with me.  Any time he got too intense or exploratory with something I assumed he needed to go pee and took him outside.  He mostly had accidents when we weren’t looking.  I like the idea of tying the leash to your belt-loop.

Post # 8
Member
3830 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I dont think you need to stay home. I didnt. But i did come home at lunch for the first 3 months to let him out. They are good in their crate because its a den, they will do anything to NOT soil their den. Take them directly out when you come home. 

Remember they can only hold their blatter for like 10 minutes at 2months old. So take them out every 30 minutes, and after they drink water, and take away water a few hours before bed.  Honestly when i took him out i would be there for like 5 minutes constantly saying “go pee, hurry up!” and when he finally did i would give him a treat and praise him big time.  He can seriously pee on command now.  So make sure they associate a treat with peeing outside. Always take them to the same spot so they associate that spot with peeing. 

AND best thing i ever did, put a bell on the door you go out of and ding it every time you take them to go pee. Eventually they will learn to hit the bell and tell you they need to pee!! Amazing. 

Honestly they will have accidents. My dog still had them till he was 10 months old! He would get excited about something and just start peeing all over the place.  Dont expect perfection any time soon. 

Post # 9
Member
28 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2014

@SweetDeeReynolds:  We did this too. My dog will ring the bell when he has to go out. It took us a couple of months to train our dog to do this, but when they finally understand it, it’s awesome! Hang the bell on the door you usually take your puppy out of and ring it yourself everytime you go out and eventually (hopefully) your puppy with start to ring it herself. Good luck!!

Post # 10
Member
334 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: February 2013

I will say the one disadvantage to the bell system is that while she does ring the bells when she needs to go to the bathroom, she also rings them occasionally when she’s just bored and wants to go outside.

Post # 11
Member
267 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@SweetDeeReynolds:  Our dogs do this too! And it’s SUPER annoying when we’re sitting in the dining room (where the bells and the back door are) and they ring the bells, go outside, come back inside, and five minutes later ring the bells again.

Still, it’s totally worth it to know that they will tell us when they need to go outside.

Post # 12
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Good advice so far.  I’ll tell you what we used on our dog, and she got it pretty quick.  This came from the organization we were raising her for (she’s a failed service dog to be).

Consistency is #1.  Applies to commands, behaviors, everything.  Make sure you and anyone else who deals with your cutie do the same thing. 

Crate is your friend!  Pup will learn to love it, too.

So… we trained her to always be quiet before we opened the crate, then wait to be told “free” before she came out, but because she got bigger and would end up (supposedly) with someone who couldn’t handle a golden retriever charging at them.  That was a lot of patience – not touching the crate door until she was “quiet”, then shutting it again if she so much as moved towards the door and didn’t “wait.”  She got it quick though.

Once they’re out of the crate – straight outside.  For the first few weeks, especially first thing in the morning, pick them up and don’t put them down until they’re where you want them to pee. 

When they start to “go” give them your potty command (for us it’s “break” so we so “break break break break break GOOD GIRL!!!”) so they associate the word with the action.  Don’t treat until you get back inside so they get treated for going out AND COMING BACK and you won’t have to follow them out for the rest of their lives.

Consistency – every time you let them out of the crate, take them outside and make sure they at least try to go.  If they won’t at least try, lock ’em up for 10-15 minutes and try again.  Once they go, they can come out and play again.  Always use the same door to go in and out of – they’ll figure it out and go to that door (smart if it has hard floors in front of it!). 

If you don’t have hawk eyes on the puppy, lock it up.  They’ll also learn to entertain themselves, go to sleep, and have to pee when they wake up.  🙂  Tying puppy to you works well, too.

If you catch them going in the house, yell at them loud enough to scare them into stopping.  Most people I know either just use a loud sound or yell “OUTSIDE.”  Then get them right the heck outside and praise the heck out of them for going outside.  Eventually they’ll get the idea and you can say “Outside?” and get a reaction. 

When it’s been a while playing in the house, just go outside.  Don’t make them go, but BIG PRAISE if they do. 

Be really careful about punishing them for going in the house, especially after the fact.  A lot of dogs will equate that with “don’t leave this where they can see it” and just start going behind the couch or in another room.

I personally hate potty bells, but they work for some people.  Our house isn’t that big, but I won’t hear bells everywhere.  And my dog is smart enough to think “Well, I rang the bell, she didn’t come, guess I can just go here.”  She just comes and finds one of us and pesters us until we let her out. 

Post # 15
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Pee pads are great for cleaning up accidents!  We had to socialize our pup and always carried them with us – they soak up a lot!  Even now, she’s 2.5 years old, if we leave her at home for too long she’ll pee in the kitchen and I use an old one (ok, 2-3, she doesn’t go unless she really had to go) to clean it up.  🙂

Post # 16
Member
531 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

You’re doing a great job, it just takes a little time.  When I was potty training my puppy I would say go peepee or go poopoo and now shes 1.5 years old and pees and poops on command, its great especially when we’re traveling or are in a rush.

My puppy was basically completely potty trained by 4 months but had a few accidents on very rare occassions (when we didnt take her out often enough) up until 1 years.

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