(Closed) Giving birth stories……..

posted 4 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
2053 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

As someone who will most likely need a c-section in a few weeks due to pregnancy complications, I take huge offense that you are calling my birth ‘un-natural’.  My baby and I are not freaks of nature.  Birth in and of itself is ‘natural’ regardless if it is vaginal, drug-free, done in the water, etc.

Post # 3
Member
2805 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

Unfortunately, this does happen. When I was in labor with my son, they kept trying to give me pitosin to move the labor along. I denied it for hours, and it was on my birth plan that I gave the nurses that not only did I not want it, but I didn’t even want to be asked. Eventually they told me that if I didn’t take it, my son could have side effects from such a long labor (it was NOT long- only 14 hours, I know people that have been in labor for 30 hours). I caved and let them give me the pitosin. I immediately had an allergic reaction to it, my Bridal Party dropped dangerously low and my sons heart rate dropped to 40bpm. They started to prep me for a c-section, but I was able to push at that point (and they had a vacuum) and I was able to get him out. It was a terrifiying experience and it was not nessesary. 

I am having #2 in December and am confident that I can stand up for myself better this time around. Being a FTM, you trust that the doctors know what they are doing and think they are looking out for you, but in reality, they are not always. 

Post # 4
Member
1527 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2016

CityBearBride:  Let’s not get too touchy here. I think we all know what she means. Natural typically means without drugs and vaginally. If C sections were “natural” then your baby would need to start chewing through your stomach.

If you are truly concerned about being bullied by doctors then consider a home birth.

Post # 5
Member
2053 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

juliaGG:  I’m 35 weeks pregnant, of course I’m going to be touchy.   I hate the fact that I carried this baby for so long and people are describing my birth as unnatural.  

Post # 6
Member
1527 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2016

CityBearBride:  The birth, not the baby. A c-section is a medical intervention just like drugs, vacuum suction, forceps, etc. Most of us did not have a natural birth.

Post # 8
Member
2699 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

Kslim13:  let my try to answer your question. Doctors want you to be happy. Happy patients give nice reviews and refer others. However, the Doctors most important concern isnt making sure that you have a medication free vaginal delivery. The most important concern is how to make sure you have a healthy baby and stay alive. 

I understand you want to have a vaginal delivery, that’s generally ideal but not always feasible. If it’s something you want try to set yourself up for it. Make sure youre at a healthy weight and in good shape. Ideally you’d be able to run less than a 12min mile and have excellent core strength. Pilates is very helpful for this. Try to make sure that you don’t gain more than 30 pounds during your pregnancy. 

However, the most important factors you have no control over, the umbilical cord and the “hat size” of the baby. Without dislocating a hip there is a finite amount of space for your birth canal, if the baby’s head is too large it just can’t be done. 

You will have the opportunity to meet with several doctors before you choose one to deliver your baby. Find one with whom you feel comfortable and trust them. Are there a few bad actors…of course, but by and large your OB wants you to have a good birth experience and together you can discuss your unique situation and how to maximize your experience.

Post # 9
Member
2699 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

CityBearBride:  having a c section is a gift your giving your baby. You are essentially volunteering for MAJOR abdominal surgery because you want the best start for your baby And this is what your doctor advises. For the most part “natural” childbirth is out the window here, from the moment you pop the first prenatal you’ve left behind the “natural” pregnancy…lol I don’t think the OP meant to hurt anyones feelings. You must be so excited to be nearing the end of your pregnancy, best wishes for a happy healthy baby!

Post # 10
Member
551 posts
Busy bee

I have had both an unmedidated birth and medicated and I am training to be a Bradley coach…but my philosophy is everyone should get what they want (as long as medically sound) and my goal is to just empower women no matter what they choose , just that they feel good while it happens. Even with drugs or a c section you can be in charge and direct the birth, it’s just a matter of educating people that you have options 

Post # 11
Member
6 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: November 2015

For having one of the world’s highest Cesearan birth rates amongst developed countries, one does wonder how we as a nation got here. Keep in mind, Obstretricians are trained surgeons. Medical care in the US is largely risk based care rather than patient focused care. I think the best thing one can do is be their own advocate through pregnancy and childbirth. Educate yourself about your choices, options, the pros and cons of interventions, your provider’s Cesearan birth rate, etc. 

Some great resources that I’ve used throughout my pregnancy are The Bradley Method childbirth classes, The Thinking Woman’s Guide to a Better Childbirth (a book), Childbirthconnection.org, and evidence based childbirth information. Whatever kind of birth you chose, you should be well informed and able to give informed consent for what ever your birth looks like. 

Post # 12
Member
1527 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2016

DVsMom:  Yes, everyone is totally different. I was like, “Okay, when can we do the epidural and can you just knock me unconscious until this is over?” lol

Post # 13
Member
6524 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

Kslim13:  when you start TTC, and you are in search for an OB or midwife, you can ask them what their C-section rate is. 

I, like you, don’t want to have a c-section bc I am afraid of getting an epidural, and the recovery afterwards, they can put you out completely but then I would be missing the birth of my child. But if I need to have one, then I guess I will have to get over my fears and do what must be done.

Whether a woman gets a c sec or has a vaginal birth, we are all amazing. Having either birth is stress and can be traumatic, both are painful. 

The bottom line is that as long as the baby is delivered safely and is healthy and the mother is healthy, thats all that matters. It doesnt matter how the baby came into the world.

 

Post # 14
Member
2514 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2015

I think a lot of care has to be put into choosing your caregiver.  Be sure you feel that your philosophies are similar, nit just during the birth process, but immediately following.  Research your hospital and it’s policies.  Do your own research and work to foster a strong relationship (and trust) in your caregiver.  And bring a support person that can and will advocate for you when/if you’re unable to do so for yourself at the time. 

I also think keeping an open mind is important.  Sometimes a c section is what’s best for mom or baby, for a number if reasons.  I think being adaptable and conscious that it’s always a possibility might help mentally prepare for it if it becomes reality.  Like a plan a, b, c, n…  whatever. 

Or I could be completely talking out my ass.  I’m still a few months away from go time. But this is how I’m trying to approach it. 

Post # 15
Member
2514 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2015

I know a lot of brand new mums. A couple had sections.  But the vast majority delivered vaginally.  None of the recent ones (11 in the last year) were induced. 1 had a pre-arranged section, medically required.  The rest went into labour on their own, at least a couple were more than a week overdue. One had a 30 hour labour, no section (and she describes it as ‘really not that bad’). 

The vast majority of them were with midwives.  And, at least in my circle, there’s been a push to avoid induction unless there is something medically wrong.  We moved my EDD back by 4 days just to give me that extra half a week before the 42 week mark (as things stand, that’s the absolute latest I’d be able to go before induction,  however that could move forward in the coming months if it stops looking suitable.)

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