(Closed) gluten-free bees- how did you transition?

posted 5 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
664 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

It’s a hard transition. I made it when I was 17 (now 23). The biggest thing is reading EVERYTHING that you eat. I used to accidentally eat wheat all the time because it would never cross my mind that it was in certain things. Twizzlers, for example, or some icecream.

I found it helped to precut a bunch of veggies at the start of the week so when I felt snacky I could grab a handful. Mealtimes aren’t too bad because you’re actively planning a gluten-free meal, but in between it’s easy to accidentally grab something that isn’t safe if you just want a snack.

Post # 5
Member
664 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Actually, you can sort-of do that. If there are places you often stop for food during the day, download their allergen info from their website. I have a list of things from Tim Hortons on my phone that I know are safe to eat/drink so that if I’m out I can grab something quick.  I dunno about an app for it though.

There are tons of good blogs with Girlfriend recipes too.

Post # 6
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I’ve contemplated switching to glutenfree because of ongoing digestive issues and for health reasons. I have not gone for it though. I have cut back where I can, but I love carbs so it would be really hard for me. Also I spend a lot of time at my in-laws, so I’d have to prepare my own meals to avoid gluten. And going out to eat, which my parents love to do when we visit or they visit us.

How hard is it when you are at restaurants or visiting family?

I think if I had a better plan to handle that, it would be a lot easier for me to transition. I know it would be healthier for me, an I think it would help me maintain my weightloss long-term.

Post # 7
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I have been gluten-free for over a year and it has made a drastic difference in my life.  I’d say that the biggest help for me has been to ELIMINATE, rather than SUBSTITUTE.  There are tons of gluten-free breads, pastas, crackers, etc. on the market right now (it’s becoming very trendy) but those foods are actually ultra processed and can make you even more unhealthy.  Some people even gain weight!  

Trust me, it’s not an easy transition by any means, but it makes a WORLD of difference.  Now, whenever I accidentally have gluten (turns out Starbucks “skinny” syrup is not GF) I feel extremely sick.  The potential for discomfort makes it a no-brainer when it comes to resisting. And you’re talking to a girl who previously ate tons of breads, pastas, cakes, cookies, etc.

@mrstilly:  I’m not going to lie – eating out and visiting people are difficult.  When you eat out, make sure that you let your server know of your allergy (calling it an allergy rather than an intolerance means they treat it a whole lot more seriously) and see what they can do to accommodate you.  You have to watch out for sauces (thickened with flour), soups with a broth base (boullion is not okay), and dressings.  In some instances, I have straight up said, “Can you create a gluten-free entree for me?  I like chicken, veggies, and potatoes.”  

When it comes to eating at another person’s house, I usually warn them beforehand and politely let them know that if accommodating me is impossible, I would be happy to bring some of my own food.  I never leave the house without some sort of snack (KIND bars, Lara bars, nuts, or fruit) in my purse and I don’t hesistate to ask about the ingredients that were used in the foods they have there.  For me, it’s worth it to be a teensy bet annoying than spend the rest of the evening sick to my stomach in the bathroom!

Gosh, okay, I practically wrote a book.  Feel free to message me with any other questions!  I can point any of you to my favorite products or some good recipes to try ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 8
Member
1659 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I’m coming up on my two year Girlfriend anniversary, march 1st ๐Ÿ™‚ I transitioned by cooking everything I ate from scratch. For like six months, all I ate was chicken, salmon, vegetables  fruit and rice because I was too scared to try anything else ๐Ÿ™‚ I felt soooooooo much better within a week of getting rid of gluten, so it was worth it. Learn as much as you can about all gluten sources, and stick to whole, unprocessed foods. You won’t be able to eat fast food and you’ll rarely be be able to eat out without it being a pain in the butt, but when you get it all figured out you can get into a rhythm and it will be easy. Like PP mentioned, a lot of labeled gluten free packaged foods are really bad for you (not to mention expensive) so just don’t even go there. I buy brown rice pasta, and Pamela’s Girlfriend baking mix (yummy pancakes!) but that’s about it.

If gluten is what’s giving you grief, the relief that you’ll feel is sooooo worth he effort it takes to transition. I never intentionally eat gluten, and if I do get “glutened” then I feel sick for sometimes three days. 

Some of my favorite gluten free “substitute” ingredients, beside meat, fish, fruit and vegetables: Vietnamese wheat free soy sauce and rice noodles from the Asian grocer, Pamela’s Girlfriend baking mix, polenta, arborio rice, cornmeal, cornstarch, spaghetti squash, brown rice flour, almond flour.

I hope you feel better!

Post # 9
Member
1645 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

@ClassyKate:  Thanks for your response! It is really helpful.

Part of my worry is that if I try it to see if it helps me feel better, I won’t be taken seriously because it’s not an actual allergy. I have no problem at restaurants saying it’s an allergy to make sure they take me seriously, but I worry about family being frustrated at family events and such. Although as I think through the menu from the holiday meals this year, there were plenty of meat/veggie potato options that were gluten free.

I guess I just have to bite the bullet and try it to see if it helps me feel better.

What do you all do if you are gluten free but your partner/children are not?

 

Post # 11
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@mrstilly:

@dovelovesfalcon:

 I totally understand the worry about feeling illegitimate in cutting it out of your diet.  That’s a tough situation, and in my case I did it all on my own.  My doctor told me it probably wouldn’t help, but I went ahead with it anyway and it made a world of difference!  The more I’ve been educated on the subject, the more I realize that our bodies were not made to be able to digest both gluten and dairy.  It’s actually a mutation if you ARE able to do so!  Now that there’s more research being done, people are coming out of the woodwork everywhere realizing that going gluten-free makes them feel a whole lot better!  

I ultimately realized that even if it were all in my head (which I know it’s not!), I am still making food choices that contribute to astronomically better eating habits!  Just eat around what they cook for you and always have snacks handy!  And if they’re obnoxious (like my family was, until my younger sister was diagnosed as having a gluten issue!) then just ignore them.

I have no experience with kids, but my fiance also eats primarily gluten free.  On the off-chance that I’m preparing pasta or something with bread, he eats the regular stuff, because it’s cheaper, but he doesn’t mind cutting the carbs.  He has some of his own snacks (Cheez-Its, pretzels, etc.) that I don’t touch, and he doesn’t touch any of my special food either.  When we go out to eat, we only choose places with gluten-free options.  In the case of children, remember that being gluten free is genetic, so it might be best for your kids to cut it out completely, too.  Experiement – see what works!

 

Post # 12
Member
664 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@mrstilly:  My Darling Husband doesn’t eat gluten free (although he probably should. His mom has celiac and he has some questionable symptoms) and we have sections of the counter in the kitchen where gluten is banned, so I always know there’s somewhere uncontaminated to make my food. We have a basket in the pantry for Girlfriend snacks and another for non-GF snacks. Usually it’s easier to cook Girlfriend for both of us though, so he eats Girlfriend dinner with me but packs whatever he wants for lunch. It’s not bad once you get used to it, and you’ll establish your own tricks as you go.

Post # 13
Member
1406 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

Can someone explain to me what you mean by digestive issues caused by gluten?  What kind of issues?  I’ve had IBS since I was a kid…I know I’m lactose intolerant….I’ll drink cow’s milk or eat ice cream but I PAY dearly.

I was drinking soy milk but since being diagnosed with endo I saw that I shouldn’t have any. It also mentioned going gluten free to help it from coming back.  BTW the doc did find endo on my bowels and said it could’ve been all over my intestines but I’d need serious surgery to remove it. 

Could going Girlfriend possibly help me?  OP Sorry to threadjack!

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