(Closed) Going HFCS free & Certifed Organic – anyone eat totally Organic???

posted 8 years ago in Food
Post # 3
Member
372 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I have not gone *totally* organic, but I am trying to eliminate HFCS (or as I like to call it, The Devil) from our diets, and I have bought directly from farms.

First of all, you’ll have to do your research and find a grower/co-op/whatever that will work for you. I found a farm that did weekly shares, but you were never really sure what you were going to get. My biggest advice for going that route is to be VERY willing to try new things (i.e. beets, leeks, kale, chard – I don’t know how much of this stuff you already eat, but I didn’t eat any of it… and still don’t, really). Otherwise, a lot of that food you get will go to waste. And there’s nothing worse than wasting food!!

You can also buy from farmers’ markets, which would eliminate getting stuff you either don’t like or have no idea how to cook. You can get whatever you want, and you can buy from a variety of growers. I’ve found that using either of the above methods will save you a TON of money over just buying organic straight from the grocery store. Buying local, to me, trumps USDA Certified Organic any day – but you have to decide what works for you and what your priorities are.

If you’re looking into pastured meat, you can also find ranchers that sell chickens or beeves that are raised on their natural diet, not grain. “They” say that this is healthier and, of course, better for the animals and their environment. Grocery stores sell free-range too but I find it harder to trust them. Maybe I’m just paranoid.

Some web sites that might help you:

http://localbounty.org

http://www.localharvest.org

Long comment is long. Sorry! Good luck =)

Post # 5
Member
1288 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - Indiana Memorial Union

In college I used to buy from a co-op and one of the key things was willingness to eat in season. Eating local foods is the only real way, I think, to be sure food is “organic” and not just slapped with a label. And if you eat local, you’re at the mercy of whatever was just harvested.

And chard isn’t bad! 🙂

Post # 7
Member
494 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

just wanted to say congrats on deciding to change your diet!  organic diets are a great way to support local farmers and it’s significantly healthier for the land and the animals 🙂  It’s definitely more expensive, though.  In college after reading about horrors associated factory farms in my philosophy class, I wanted to go entirely organic…especially with animal products.  But I wasn’t really able to afford the diet because organic meat can be extremely costly.  So I became a vegetarian but I do buy organic animal product like milk.  Farmer’s markets are a great way to buy locally!  And co-ops are good especially if you can split the portions with several people but you do have to be willing to eat what’s in season!  There are also co-ops available for meat from local farmers.  I guess it really depends on where you live.

Post # 8
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

It’s more expensive, but totally worth it to make the change.  One way to keep costs down is to buy certain items in bulk from food co-ops.  It’s amazing how many different meals you can get out of a sack of beans and a sack of rice.  Dried fruits make awesome snacks, and rolled oats with raw sugar and dried cranberries is an excellent breakfast.

Post # 10
Member
208 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Good for you! You should be really proud for what you are doing for your body and the environment!  I have also made changes in our food consumption to eliminate HFCS and eat more organic. Farm shares are great. Instead of buying artificial sweetners to satisfy any sweet cravings, I recommend experimenting with Honey, Brown Rice Syrup and Pure Maple Syrup.  You may also want to think about investing in a chest freezer if you have the space, that way you can purchase local foods when they are bountiful and freeze them for the colder months.  Spinach, Chard and Kale freeze really well and can be added to almost anything to boost the nutritional content. 

Post # 11
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

I miss Harry’s!  One way to avoid spending your entire paycheck is to stick to the outside aisles – where the fresh produce, dairy and meats are.  Avoid the inner aisles with packaged foods and bottled beverages.  So tasty, but also so $$$.

You can also split your shopping up – which is what we do.  Fruit (and sometimes meat) from Whole Foods, veggies from the weekly Farmer’s Market and cereal, etc. from Trader Joe’s.  It’s time consuming, but you do save money.

Oh!  Honey and agave syrups are good sugar substitutes.

Post # 12
Member
946 posts
Busy bee

Laylabelle, since you said the Harry’s is near you, I’m pretty sure I know where you’re at.  Harry’s is by far the best grocery store for organics in your neck of the woods.  If you’re every down towards Atlanta, check out Dekalb Farmer’s Market.  It’s pretty awesome.  I eat mostly organic right now, and it is expensive, but after a month, you will notice a difference in the way you feel!

 

 

Post # 14
Member
946 posts
Busy bee

By the way, what two farms are you talking about?  (My Boyfriend or Best Friend lives up your way, and I’d love to check ’em out)

Post # 16
Member
348 posts
Helper bee

If you are interested in a farm share (which we have and love – personally, I prefer not having to pick out my veggies for the week and being forced to try new stuff), you will want to search for “Community Supported Agriculture” (CSA) programs. 

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