(Closed) going to the doc tomorrow

posted 7 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
2000 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

@anotherbee: If you’re not ovulating, your progesterone is going to remain low throughout your cycle, so I wouldn’t worry too much about spotting. If, after you fix the anovulation problem, you’re still having pre-AF spotting, then it might be something to concerned about. 

My biggest advice is this: Don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself. Be polite, but firm. Stay calm, even if she dismisses your concerns at first. 

Know what you want her to do ahead of time. If you want tests ask for them — “I’m concerned my anovulation may be a sign of Polycistic Ovary Syndrome. Can we do some bloodwork to test my insulin, glucose and androgen levels?” or “Would it be possible to schedule an ultrasound to check for cysts?” If you want her to prescribe clomid, ask her if that’s a possibility.

If she tells you to keep trying — that it hasn’t been long enough — tell her that you are fine with that as long as she is willing to perform testing now because your charts are showing that you are not ovulating. If she’s not, then you’ll know it’s time to find a new doctor!

Post # 4
Member
2808 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@anotherbee:  Bunny is giving you great advice. I can’t speak to the TTC issues because we aren’t there just yet, but I’ve found in my experience that blunt people don’t pick up on subtlety very well. Be politely blunt and firm right back with her in order to make your point. She might lack the sensitivity (not in a mean way) that a person needs to grasp some of the emotional aspects of this. A firm appeal to her rational side would probably be the best approach.

Post # 6
Member
2000 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

@anotherbee: Sorry — I know I’ve brought up PCOS before on a thread you started and I seem to remember you don’t have other symptoms of it besides anovulation. It’s just my go-to answer because that’s what is causing my problems (we think). No matter what the issue is, I definitely think blood tests would be worth your while! 🙂

Post # 9
Member
1116 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2008

@anotherbee: Sorry your GP didn’t really take you seriously.  But glad you got a referral to the OB-GYN.  I think you should have better luck with them.  They should be very familiar with charting and identifying the signs of anovulation, and should definitely ‘get’ that no ovulation keeps you from being able to ttc.  The plus is that with an an-O or pcos diagnosis, your insurance may be more likely to cover any monitoring or meds that you might need.  You may also be able to take metformin or something that isn’t an actual fertility drug, and that might be enough to get those eggs to drop!  Good luck!

Post # 11
Member
2000 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

Hey Anotherbee, was thinking of you today. When is the appointment with the doc you were referred to?

Post # 13
Member
618 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010 - Catholic Church & The Engine Room at Georgetown Studios

If you progesterone is low there are things you can do (vitamins and supplements) that you can do without your doc. there are also diet things that you can do. I’d encourage you to find a more reasonable GYN- the whole 6 months thing is a load of crap. If you have signs of low progesterone you should start treating that now. Not everything has to be solved with “powerful fertilty drugs”.

Post # 15
Bee
6473 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011 - Sydney, Australia

My advice {and this comes from dealing with a GP who doesn’t give a hoot about charting and wasn’t seeing the point of me seeing a RE for months} is this: take everything you have. If you go in armed with charts, cycle history, and a record of your annovulatory cycles, you’re more likely to get a response. You can also be forward and ASK for what you want – whether it’s something to help regulate your cycles, or what not. Good luck!

The topic ‘going to the doc tomorrow’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors