(Closed) Got a puppy….now I'm not sure if it was the right decision…

posted 4 years ago in Pets
Post # 121
Member
628 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

Anon721:  +1, and at six weeks old nonetheless.

I’m not looking to rip you a new one so I have to duck out now. I just hope you get that the dog’s not the problem here.

Post # 122
Member
332 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

I felt this way for a couple of months about my dog when she was a pup.  It was really stressful!  I was doing it all alone and working full time.  I ended up enrolling her in puppy school, which helped a bit.  All I can say is… give it time!!!  My dog is my best friend (she is 2 now).  I don’t miss those puppy days but I am so glad I stuck it out and so happy to have an amazing dog now.

Post # 123
Member
1418 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

RedHeadKel:  So am I, I know of a few awesome rescues that would take the pup in MN if she was here. 

Post # 124
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee

I know where you’re coming from. Puppies are hard! But, dogs are worth it! Work with her regularly. Maybe you could find a neighborhood kid (teenager?) to help with some of the exercise, and that’d give you a break from her periodically. Another “tactic” I used when I was sick in bed with young puppies was to use a laser pointer to tire them out. They chase the light around the house/yard, and it doesn’t take much effort on your part. Like PP have mentioned, a tired puppy is a well behaved puppy. Set up a routine that works for you, and stick to it. She’ll soon begin to learn what you want from her. Dogs want to please their people, so anytime she does what she’s supposed to, reward her! 

Please do not give up on this young pup! It’s a lot of work right now, but she’ll become your best friend. Dogs truly are the most loyal friends you can have.

Post # 125
Member
1262 posts
Bumble bee

PLEASE make sure you keep her until you are able to find a good, responsible home that you are certain is committed to keeping her forever. It’s very, very hard for dogs to get bounced around between families, and she sees you as her family, so one of the worst things you could do is give her to the first person interested without vetting them, and potentially give her a lifetime of being tossed around.

Please also do not bring her to a shelter. As you said, this situation is not her fault. Don’t make her pay the price. Shelter workers and rescuers are heartbreakingly overloaded with abandoned and unwanted animals, so please don’t add to that any more.

Post # 126
Member
29 posts
Newbee

Something in the milk of this post ain’t clean.  Had dogs before, tons of research — yet still bought a too-young puppy (who is a high-energy breed) from a parking lot, backyard breeder?  Oh, okay.

My advice: give the dog up, acknowledge that you fudged up and just never, ever get a dog again because you ain’t suited for it, babe.

Post # 127
Member
29 posts
Newbee

Accidental double post. 🙁

Post # 128
Hostess
3890 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

Like PP said, the puppy blues is really common. I was raised with dogs and did research for several years before my Fiance and I adopted our Bernese Mountain Dog. He’s also a working dog, but is much more low energy than Aussies, Labs, and Boxers. I will admit that I broke down sobbing more than once during his potty training and teething stages (and recently when he destroyed my favorite pair of work heels that were up on a shelf – he’s tall!) and thought that it was always going to be like that. But man, I really love my puppy. He’s now almost 9 months, and 80 pounds of fluffy love. I know that when he gets into trouble, it’s because we didn’t exercise him enough that day/the day before and that’s on us. When he’s getting enough exercise, socialization (our neighborhood is very dog friendly with several dog parks near by and he occasionally goes to doggy daycare), and playtime with us, he’s a happy, well behaved puppy. I think PP have explained your options thoroughly, so I just wanted to add that you’re not the only one who has felt this way, and it really does get better. I can’t imagine my life without my puppy and consider him my child. It also helped a lot when my Fiance stepped up. The first month or so, he was barely involved in our puppy’s care and after I talked to him about it, I found out it was because he didn’t really know what he was doing and was scared that he would be doing something inconsistant with what I was doing. We ended up talking about our training and behavioral goals and once we were on the same page, he helped out a lot more, which was such a relief. Definitely try to get your Fiance on board, she’s his dog too!

Post # 129
Member
65 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

tagerosan:  Aw, she is lucky she found you! I have a “problem animal” as well, she is such a brat but so worth it 🙂

Post # 130
Member
716 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

LittleMissRuca:  Happy to see another Shelter worker here sharing the truth! Puppies are so in demand we have multiple people wanting to adopt them. People worried about this dog being put down at a shelter is rediculous. 

Post # 131
Member
716 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

I’ve given more thought to this and really feel if you can’t or won’t dedicate the resources needed to raising her right, you should rehome her. Puppies need to be taught about the world and how to live in. Every day my Shelter receives dogs who are past that little cute puppy stage because people didn’t invest the time to socialize and train them properly. Some even display severe aggression or fear. We work with the dogs but it is harder to find them a home than a younger puppy who is easier to train.

You’ve basically taken on a large active breed dog who is a baby and needs to be treated as such. That means not getting mad when she has an accident (she really can’t hold it and until she’s older, she doesn’t even get the signal from her brain that she has to go unti she’s literally about to go) taking her to puppy class, socializing her as much as possible and ensuring all her needs are met. If you won’t do that, don’t set her up for failure. If you’d really done as much research into owning a puppy as you say, all of this should have been common knowledge.

I’m all for making a committment to an animal you’ve chosen to bring into you family, but not to the harm of the animal. She deserves someone who will give her everything she needs. 

  • This reply was modified 4 years ago by  blue996.
Post # 132
Member
308 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2015 - City Hall NYC

Puppies are very hard work and when I got my first one it was draining.  I went through this period of misery but things did get better and I cannot live without my pups.  Get a good trainer, take her to puppy socialization classes, a tired puppy is a good puppy.  If you still feel you cannot take care of her please contact a rescue group in your area.  Do not post her on the internet or just give her away to anyone.  Good luck.

Post # 133
Member
193 posts
Blushing bee

I haven’t read through all of the comments so maybe this was already addressed.  Of the handful of comments that I did read, it seemed to be a common thing for folks to be saying that puppies are rarely put down in shelters.  To the folks who said that, you must live in parts of the country where the pet overpopulation really is not much of a problem (good for you!).  I know for a fact that many, many puppies are put down in rural parts of West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and many other states.  Entire litters of puppies are put down for no other reason than lack of space, lack of adopters, lack of funds, lack of rescues able to pull from them.  I can’t begin to tell you how many times I have tried to pull a puppy or a litter of puppies from a rural shelter (to foster) and been told that they had already been put down.  I have no idea where the OP is located or what her local shelter is like.  It is possible that they are one of the lucky few shelters who do not have to put puppies down.  I highly suggest that anyone looking to place their dog or puppy or any animal into a shelter do their research first, find out the shelters stats and what the likelyhood is of that animal making it out of the shelter alive.

On a completely different note, I have been there with the puppy blues.  Two weeks after my FL and I had adopted our first puppy, I had a meltdown.  It was too much work, he wouldn’t listen, I hated having to get up in the middle of the night to take him out or cleaning up an accident when I woke up, I hated having to go home mid day to walk him and when I just wanted to lay on the couch at the end of a long day, he was ready to play… I wanted to return him but ultimately we decided  not too.  Thank goodness because he ended up being the worlds greatest dog!  We have since gone on to adopt 4 more dogs and foster hundreds more (yes sometimes entire litters of puppies).  I look back on those first few weeks and just laugh at myself!

Post # 134
Member
438 posts
Helper bee

I’ve not read the replies, but my advice is to rehome her ASAP to someone you know will care for her. Maybe even offer to split the cost of spaying. If you dread waking up to your dog, that’s not fair to you or her. You tried it, quickly realized youre not up for the challenge, and that’s okay!

If it were a dog you’d had for years Id feel differently, but four weeks is less time than some dogs spend in foster care. She’ll be okay. Just be responsible about rehoming her. You don’t want her to wind up tied to a chain her whole life spitting out litters and litters of puppies because her new owners are too lazy to get her neutered. 

Post # 135
Member
1303 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: Hawksnest Cove Beach St John USVI

I live in GA and when we chose our fur baby from a shelter she was the last one from a litter that was abandoned and there were people trying to adopt her as we were walking out. The no kill shelter we chose does an amazing job of advertising on FB, the paper, and on local TV. She was advertised as a lab / Bermese mix but she was actually a lab Aussie mix so way more hyper than we were expecting. 

At first she was more than a handful!  She chewed on everything, chased my little dog, and bounced everywhere! She ruined a lot of furniture, but we didn’t give up. She just turned one and she’s calmed down a ton and is becoming super loving. I work from home and take breaks to let her run and play.  If we don’t run her enough during the day she’s still a handful at night and won’t want to lay down and sleep. I agree with PP that a doggy day camp would be great for the pup!

If you do decide to re-home the dog and are in my area let me know. I would be happy to foster and my neighbors run a no-kill shelter as well. 

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