(Closed) Grammar/Spelling

posted 10 months ago in The Lounge
Post # 46
Member
10568 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: City, State

Twizbe :  

I believe the apostrophe rule depends on wh your noun is plural or not.

Possesive noun, singular= apostrophe and “s”.

Possesive noun, plural= only an apostrophe if the noun ends in “s”.  When a plural noun ends in a letter other than “s”, use both apostrophe and “s”.

If you feel adventurous and especially enjoy a little confusion, you can do it as dictated by APA guidelines, with which I am stuck. The APA makes it sound more complicated than it really is by throwing in the “pronounced s” vs the “silents s”.

Gosh, this was fun!

Post # 47
Member
2660 posts
Sugar bee

I’s, as in his and I’s car”. It’s OK to say me and mine and ours. But i think people think they sound more intelligent with I rather than me.

 

And  another one of my favorites: intensive purposes

Post # 48
Member
1511 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2018 - Location

kissthesunkisstherain :  it’s the wrong pronoun. You should say “the friend who got married” 

They’re a person, not an object! 

Post # 50
Member
4673 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

sunburn :  I agree with you about that post. OP being a teacher making so many grammatical mistakes made me cringe.

Post # 51
Member
287 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2025 - City, State

I defiantly agree that decent grammar and spelling are important to making oneself understood in a forum such as this one.

 

😉

Post # 52
Member
413 posts
Helper bee

I probably notice these mistakes more than most people because I’m a professional copy editor, but I never correct people. So I guess you could say I’m a grammar snob, but I keep it to myself (unless I’m at work, where I get paid to correct spelling/grammar errors). And if English is not your first language, I wouldn’t hold it against you. I’m in awe of people who can speak more than one language fluently, so I don’t expect perfect grammar from people who speak English as a second language. I do feel that native English speakers should know these rules by the time they’re adults, but I’m not going to give anyone grief about it on the Internet.

Post # 53
Member
565 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I can’t stand “utilize,” which is used almost exclusively by people who think it makes them sound smarter than just saying “use.”

Post # 54
Member
9175 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

Here, the one that irritates me the most is “bee’s” for “bees”. As in “Bee’s I need your advice!” “Bee’s please tell me about Chicago!” Etc.

Post # 55
Member
6403 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

cassandra7 :  I agree.  However, one can say, “He and I went to the movie.”

Overall, I agree that message boards are casual, and I prefer to silently judge instead of call anyone out. Anyone, myself included, can make mistakes over text or in a casual setting. 

Post # 56
Member
760 posts
Busy bee

elderbee :  OMG! Thank you for this post. It drives me crazy too!

Post # 57
Member
488 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 1969 - City, State

lovelyruby :   I would not typically refer to an inanimate object like a dresser using the pronoun “who” unless I’m attempting to personify it.

jayrock : Yes, in general you should use “who” but in some instances I wouldn’t say it is inaccurate to use “that”. For example, if you are being wooed by two fetching young men, you would say the gentleman “that” has stolen your heart is the one you would be with, to distinguish your “object” of affection from the other. You can use “who” – most people do – but “that” tells me that more than one man was in the picture. 

The pronoun “that” can be used purposefully to refer to people to add more information for audience, i.e. specificity and context. 

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/pronouns/relative-pronouns The example from the website tells you that a specific group of parents was/were involved in education, i.e. those who were interviewed:<em class=”i”><u class=”u”>The parents</u> (<strong class=”b”>whom/who/that) we interviewed were all involved in education in some way.

Post # 58
Member
3407 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

kissthesunkisstherain :  Right. It’s a matter of “that” versus “who”. A table isn’t a who, and a person isn’t a that.

We don’t say “the table WHO has a red tablecloth”. We would say “the table THAT has…” Or “the man who stole my heart is over there”. 

Now, “that” versus “which” is one that always confuses me. 

Post # 59
Member
1511 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2018 - Location

lovelyruby :  yes this is what I meant in my OP. Thank you. 

Post # 60
Member
488 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 1969 - City, State

lovelyruby : I never said it was accurate to say “the table who has a red tablecloth.” Same grammatical rule for “that” vs “which” applies. “That” refers to a specific, not a general inanimate object.

Anyway, I rest my case. If you will, take it from Cambridge. “That” can be used for people, animals and things. E.g. The parents (whom/who/that) we interviewed were all involved in education in some way. 

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/pronouns/relative-pronouns

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