(Closed) Grammar/Spelling

posted 10 months ago in The Lounge
Post # 61
Member
6409 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

lovelyruby: That refers to a restrictive clause; which would change the meaning of the sentence if eliminated.

Which is nonrestrictive; it simply adds information to the sentence, but that information can be eliminated without changind the basic meaning. A clause using which has commas on either side (which is a visual way of reminding a person that it can be lifted from the sentence without changing the meaning).

So you would say, “The dog that scares me lives next door.” No other dog can be substituted. This is specifically the dog that scares you.

But you would say, “The spotted dog, which I told you about yesterday, lives next door.” The spotted dog still lives next door, whether or not anyone remembers you telling them about it the day before.

Post # 62
Member
909 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 1983
  • elderbee–Re “gift” as a verb. Words change part of speech all the time, of course and much to my despair, but usually they also get (repulsively) longer as in glitterati‘s example of (woe) “use” becoming “utilize.” It’s a mystery.
  • Add confusing “whoa” and “woe” to the list.
  • echomomm–“I,” “we,” “he,” “she,” and “they” are used as the subject of a sentence or clause; “me,” “us,” “him,” “her,” and “them” are forms for the object of a sentence/clause. “I gave it to him.” “We invited Sally and him.” “Oh, woe! I forgot to send a gift to her for her wedding. Or to him, either.” “You” works as subject or object, as singular or plural. “Her” can be the possessive as well as the objective, but “his,” possessive,” is not objective–another mystery. Anyway, if it’s after “to” or “at” or “with” or any other preposition, use “me,” “her,” “him,” “us,” or “them.” 
  • “Ask a simple question; you get a pageant.” (Stan Freberg)
Post # 63
Member
488 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 1969 - City, State

echomomm :  So you would say, “The dog that scares me lives next door.” No other dog can be substituted. This is specifically the dog that scares you.

I know this is not exactly relevant to the “that” vs” who” discussion but thanks for explaining it in a way that is much clearer than in my previous post. 

 

Post # 64
Member
909 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 1983
  • echomomm–I apologize for telling you things you already know about pronouns. I misunderstood your level of expertise.
  • Even Fowler pretty much gave up on “that” and “which” after explaing their use for most of a page.
Post # 65
Member
410 posts
Helper bee

DEFINITLEY! Or definintley, or any other misspelling of the word! I get it, it took me a while to get it consistently right, but some days it seems I’m the only one!

DE-FINITE-LY. Definitely.

Post # 66
Member
3941 posts
Honey bee

lifeisbeeutiful :  Thank you. I was certainly taken aback by the assertion that  I was mean to point it out. I think it would be more mean to the children this poster was teaching *not* to point it out. 

Post # 67
Member
6536 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

I remembered the other phrase that bugs me here: “for all intensive purposes”. NO!  “For all intents and purposes”, for heaven’s sake. 

Post # 68
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

cassandra7 :  “gift” is also a verb. Has been for, well, forever. It is synonymous with “present” (ironically, both a noun and verb).

Post # 69
Member
909 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 1983

Four hundred years, but not in wide usage as it is now. It’s one of those 5% things: Use “lay” for “lie,” most people won’t notice, and five percent of your listeners/readers will wince. Or not give you the job. Or marry you. Or whatever. That is, most people don’t care at all, and the few who care care intensely. Language is always changing, and some of the changes are very hard for some people (I am among them, obviously) to accept.

Post # 70
Member
11974 posts
Sugar Beekeeper

In addition to many of the PPs:

“Brag on” instead of “brag about.” 

“Take a listen” instead of “Listen” or “Let’s listen.” Seemingly every reporter in the last five years has adopted this one. 

Post # 72
Member
909 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 1983

Elderbee, how do you feel about people who think “fulsome praise” is positive?

Post # 73
Member
414 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: Canada

Were vs where.  I can’t understand how they can be confused for each other.  

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