(Closed) Grammar: Why do I cringe so badly when I'm not a perfectionist?

posted 5 years ago in Weddingbee
Post # 3
Member
1685 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I cringe when people say “I could care less about…

That means you COULD care less, as in you do care.

The correct term is “I couldn’t care less.” 

That’s my “clang.”

Post # 5
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

because APOSTROPHES NEVER MAKE THINGS PLURAL!

 

I have a lot of grammatical “clangs” 🙂

They + are = they’re (their is posessive, there is a location)

You + are = you’re (your is posessive)

could/would/should HAVE (not ‘of’)

ALOT doesn’t exist, it’s A (space) LOT.  We don’t say ‘alittle’ do we?

 

Post # 7
Member
8042 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

@joya_aspera:  I’m with you on this one. I feel the same way, and yes, I frequently have typos myself, and lately when you go to edit your post, it messes up formatting so I’ve just been leaving it these days 😛

The big one that bugs me these days is “should of” or “could of”. CRINGE. Seriously people? Does that even make sense to you?!

 

Post # 8
Member
3778 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@joya_aspera:  Well, irregardless of your personal mistakes that you make, I think some people just speak/type based on what they hear most often. Supposively, anyways, people don’t realize they’re saying anything wrong.

Post # 9
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

Maybe because we’ve been taught what’s “right” and so when we hear/see things that are incorrect, it’s jarring…but I don’t think that adequately explains the “clang”.  

 

My fiance is going on and on about beer right now.  OMG.  

Post # 10
Member
8453 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

Post # 12
Member
1685 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Another thing that drives me nuts is when people don’t properly construct a sentence and when I read a run on sentence I can’t help but start going faster and faster in an attempt to reach a rest point where I can take a breath which really doesn’t make sense since I’m reading this and not saying it but nonetheless I end up missing the whole point of their paragraph which I would have easily understood if a couple of pauses and breaks could have been inputted to break up all their text.

Post # 13
Member
1685 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Of cuorse Im obvioussly prefect in evry way nad never nede to eidt a posts after possting

Post # 14
Member
3265 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2014

@BeachBride2014:  I got to the part of reading faster and faster and just about died laughing because that is me exactly.

@housebee:  This always makes me smile.

 

Their/They’re/There and “alot” are my two major clangs. I’m certainly not perfect but !$*&!! It’s not rocket science!

Post # 15
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

Found a blog post that talks about the difference between “all of a sudden/the sudden”:

 

http://painintheenglish.com/case/483

 

Seems that it’s mainly a dialect difference. “All of a sudden” is much more widely preferred (and thus sounds “right” and the other one sounds wrong to more people).

Really, though, since it’s an idiomatic expression anyway, it’s hard to say it’s more proper than the other. “Sudden” is no longer used as a noun in modern English – we never talk about “a sudden” in any other context except in this expression, right? So if we’re going to nitpick grammar, the best option is to lose the idiom and go with “suddenly.”

Anyhow … my pet peeve is when people use “reticent” for “unwilling or hesitant to do something” when they ought to use “reluctant.” “Reticent” comes from tacere, to be silent, the same Latin root that gives us words like “tacit” and “taciturn,” and it properly means “reserved, unwilling to speak.” Over the past couple of decades, though, there’s been a widespread tendency to conflate “reluctant + hesitant,” which are synonyms, and people come out with “reticent” even if it’s reluctance to DO rather than SAY something. Ugh. We already have two perfectly good words for that – why weaken the precision of English by blunting the meaning of a third?

Post # 16
Member
3778 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Oooh I have another one! It drives me bananas when people leave the “d” off of the end of certain words!!! I.e. “I’m a license driver!” Oh yeah? Where do you drive the licenses?

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