(Closed) Greeting guest at reception

posted 4 years ago in Reception
Post # 2
Member
4767 posts
Honey bee

Asking people to come up to you to be greeted at a party you’re hosting is pretty rude – you need to make sure you have individually greeted all of your guests, not put it on them to find you.  If you don’t want to do table visits, then do a receiving line either while exiting your ceremony venue or greeting people as they enter your reception venue, whichever works out best logistically.  With 150 guests, it will probably take you 30 minutes, maybe 40 tops if you’re not very efficient at moving people through the line but it turns out if you’re standing between people and the free food and booze they really don’t tend to linger.  A quick handshake or hug, they tell you how nice your ceremony was, you thank them for coming, and you’re off to the next person in line and they are off to get a drink at the bar.  10-15 seconds per person and you’re done.

Post # 3
Member
9881 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I don’t like the idea of guests coming to you.  As a guest, I’d feel like I was intruding and wouldn’t come up to you.  I don’t know what the solution is if you don’t want to go around (receiving lines will take  forever – 30 seconds per guest would still put you over an hour alone), but asking people to come to you seems off-putting to me.

Post # 4
Member
495 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

I have never heard of individually greeting all your guests! What nonsense, what if you have several hundred guests?

The last two weddings I attended, the bride and groom did not go greet everyone individually. They did their entrance after everyone else was already there and seated, we all sat and had toasts, speeches etc, then there was food and drink. And finally everyone got up to dance. They moved around and took photos with people and such throughout the night, but they certainly didn’t thank and greet everyone individually.

I wouldn’t ask guests to come to you, just let them approach you should they feel fit throughout the night.

Post # 5
Member
58 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

It’s becoming more common to greet guests while they are entering the reception. Instead of the bride & groom making their “grand entrace” (after everyone is seated and waiting for them), the bride & groom are the first to arrive at the reception and are greeting everyone as they come. This could also double as a photo opp with all your guests.

Personally, I like the tradition of going around to greet guests, though. I think that is what we will do even with our 250 guests.

Post # 6
Member
3589 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

We had everyone come up to us after the ceremony and it kind of turned into a ‘hug line’. Plus we did table visits/photos and danced and talked to people all night. I ate all my food and I danced the most out of anyone. 

Post # 7
Member
9443 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2016

It really didn’t take that long to greet our guests. We ate our dinner first, no rush at all, and then stopped by each table for a brief moment to say hello and thank-you. It was all wrapped up before the toasts. We didn’t miss out on a single thing or feel rushed. We probably didn’t spend more than a minute at each table and if you have 150 guests at 10 person tables then it shouldn’t take any longer than 15-20 minutes.

Having the guests come up while we were eating would have been much more frustrating since I really enjoyed having that time with just my husband and myself (we had a sweetheart table).

Post # 8
Member
3187 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

Reception line. If you don’t want to greet guests during table visits (or some version of that) then the alternative is to have a reception line. Gotta do one or the other (or else be terribly rude). This may be your PPD, but you’re not royalty – guests don’t come to you.

Post # 9
Member
13556 posts
Honey Beekeeper

Etiquette obliges the couple to greet and thank each guest for coming, either at the reception, or a dedicated receiving line. We had plenty of  time to do both. 

It’s a basic gesture of hospitality. 

Post # 10
Member
477 posts
Helper bee

Please greet your guests in some fashion. it is polite.Thank heaven the receiving lines of the 50s are gone.

Post # 11
Member
281 posts
Helper bee

My cousin did the coolest thing at her wedding.   They had a buffet,  and her and her new husband donned aprons and dished out part of the dinner on the buffet line.  They got to greet everyone quickly and showed how humbled they were at their guests presence.  

Post # 12
Member
443 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

We had a dessert buffet so I stood by the queue and talked to everyone at the pace in which the queue moved which worked well. I hadn’t had a chance to visit all the tables as I chat for too long. I didn’t plan it, decided on the day. Not sure where my husband was at that point!

Post # 13
Member
634 posts
Busy bee

We did a receiving line as guests left the church & then worked the room during the reception, which was a sit down dinner so between the courses, we spilt the tables and went around. As I wanted to dance the night away & enjoy the band, I wanted to make sure we had spoken to everyone prior to this. Naturally there’s lots of chat & conversation during the dance or my quick refreshment breaks! We had 150 at our wedding. 

Post # 14
Member
2260 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

You really need to do a receiving line or table visits (we did both!).  Otherwise, you are acting pretty rude.  People traveled to your wedding and spent money on a gift for you.  The least you can do is say hello.

Post # 15
Member
4044 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

We took pictures beforehand so we could go to cocktail hour. We mingled and greeted almost everyone while we were there. Then, we got to eat and party at our reception!

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