(Closed) Guilt over Chinese dresses?

posted 7 years ago in Dress
  • poll: How important to you was buying a dress made without sweatshop labor?
    I was aware of the concerns, but it wasn't important : (27 votes)
    29 %
    I didn't know about labor concerns : (22 votes)
    24 %
    Important - but ultimately my wedding budget ruled against me : (13 votes)
    14 %
    Very important - I bought a dress made in a country with fair labor practices : (31 votes)
    33 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    1271 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2013

    actually, 95% of the dresses you buy in the US are made in china anyway.  the difference is that you know what you’re getting and there’s more accountability for mistakes, whereas there’s a lot more risk involved when buying directly from a chinese seller.  there are a handful of designers that have their gowns made in the US, however these designers tend to be at price points that are prohibitively expensive for most brides.  i can think of claire pettibone and vera wang–altho i think “white” is made in china–off the top of my head.  there are some others…i looked it up at one point because i was concerned about it myself and came to the conclusion that there really wasn’t anything i could do about it on my budget.  the cost of a US-made gown is nearly my entire wedding budget.

    Post # 6
    Member
    6349 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: August 2014

    It’s very difficult to shop ethically all the time. Most electronics, white goods and so on are manufactured in places like China, where workers are paid a pittance, working conditions are incredibly poor, and child labour may be used. The same goes for a lot of big clothing brands, like Nike, etc.

    Where possible, I buy things that are made in England as that way, generally speaking, you know that workers should be being paid a fair wage; and I’m happy to pay more. But that still leaves other issues such as the fabric, as you don’t always know where it’s been produced and what the working conditions are; it’s a minefield.

    With regards to wedding dresses from China, I’ve never been under any illusions as to why they are so cheap; the workers are probably paid next to nothing, plus the fabric may not be as good quality. It’s common sense. But that said, I don’t know where my dress was made, or where the fabric was produced, and in all honesty, it didn’t enter into the equation for me; it would be a nightmare I think trying to find something that was 100% ethically produced. And let’s face it, even when clothes are made in England, the employees are probably on minimum wage, working long hours, and minimum wage in England is not enough to live on (NB: I am not comparing England with China)

    I wish more companies would be more responsible, and I wish the government would force them to be transparent about where things are produced, and where all the components come from. I think it would make it easier for people who want to buy ethically

    Post # 7
    Member
    891 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    I think Enzoani is made in China aswell, even the designer is from China. Allure as well I think.  I wanted to get a dress from China or from an Etsy seller I heard good reviews from. My Fiance basically just said no straight out the times I’ve been talking about this, he wanted to get a “branded” dress for me, to eliminate the stress of dealing with a bad dress (you never know). It has come to my mind aswell how the workers are treated if they are treated humanely, etc. I don’t know. I have been hoping that they are treated fairly. You can always hope. It’s like all the other branded clothes we wear, and use. it’s not like they don’t have the same problems with labor. It’s just in this case it’s wedding dresses… in this case for me, it’s about the economical situation. I can’t afford an over the top, in country sewn dress. Too expensive. Unfortunately.  But getting the dress from a dress store is better than ordering from a website I guess from a consumer point of view. At least in Scandinavia!

    Post # 8
    Member
    4887 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    I mean, I see what you’re saying – but people in China need to work to survive just like we do, and whether or not we agree with their labor laws, they still need to make a living.  This is how many choose to do it.  I’m happy with a choice that will keep anyone employed and able to put food on the table – as long as they’re not working by force.  It’s not right of me to say that since I don’t think $.40/hour (or whatever wage it is) is enough, I won’t support it.  That just means less work at $.40/hour and maybe the factory will have to shut down.  Which is even worse.

     

     

    Post # 10
    Member
    3618 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2011

    @KristenGotMarried: agreed.

    People have to remember that China is not like America. The kids are not required to go to school, nor is it readily available to everyone. These people are skilled at making things, that is their expertise. What else would you suggest someone who doesn’t have an education to do for a living to support their family? The conditions, wages, and treatment are horrific to us, but to them that’s the way of life.

    Post # 11
    Member
    1249 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: January 1992

    You know, the work done on my wedding dress was so much better than on a Forever 21 dress.  The quality on my dress from Dressily was better than dresses from Alfred Angelo (I compared a similar dress my best friend had at her wedding).  Factories in China wouldn’t get that kind of quality by hiring a normal factory worker, and so I assume that a good quality seamstress probably gets paid a decent wage.

    Post # 12
    Member
    3618 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2011

    Here’s another food for thought.

    I read this article a few years back. It talked about how high end designers in Italy bring chinese immigrants over to Italy to make those beautiful high end designer bags we all drool over. So the label reads “Made in Italy” but they’re still made by chinese immigrants who are working in sweat shop conditions.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2008/feb/20/world/fg-madeinitaly20

    Post # 13
    Member
    3520 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: March 2012

    In Laos, people who work in clothing factories are considered skilled labor, and it’s a good job to have.  To put things in perspective, you can get an order of pad thai in a restaurant in Thailand for $0.80.  The same dish would cost you about $8-$10 here in the states.

    For me, I chose to order my dress from an etsy seller in Oregon.  She does amazing work, and at $180 (I supplied the fabric), she was almost as cheap as ordering a dress from China! 

    Post # 14
    Member
    1249 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: January 1992

    @yellowshoe:  It’s also like that in rural areas here in the US – Kentucky, anyone?  I know missionaries that work in the mountains of Kentucky, and most people there never go 5 miles from the place they were born.

    ETA: Not trying to threadjack – just saying it’s not as bad as it used to be in China, and everyone still has a long way to go.

    Post # 15
    Member
    891 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    @MrsLongcoatPeacoat: That was a great deal. I can’t get a hold of a good seamstress here, that’s the thing, and those that are good I have to pay almost the same price as a branded one or even more depending on fabric. It’s like a dead end. :/

    Post # 16
    Member
    3618 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2011

    @rubyred605: first off, hello date twin!

    And yes, I totally agree that it’s not that bad. Again, we have to remember their quality of life isn’t the same as ours.

    The topic ‘Guilt over Chinese dresses?’ is closed to new replies.

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