(Closed) Hard Rock – Diamond alternatives

posted 8 years ago in Rings
  • poll: What "hard" alternatives are there to a diamond?

    Sapphire

    Ruby

    Moissanite

    Cubic zirconia (CZ)

    "Black Diamond"

    Topaz

    Emerald

    Alexandrite

    ...other (see comment)

  • Post # 17
    Member
    397 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: May 2014

    I would argue that any naturally occurring mineral that is mined from the earth in certain countries (eg Africa, India) is likely to have some level of morality issue associated with it, its because the profit margins and markup of diamonds is so high that they’ve been targeted.

    But the Canadian or Austalian diamonds are an alternative.

    If you are wanting 100% ethical then you’d have to go lab-created in which case you could look at lab-created diamonds. They ARE diamonds in every sense but just created in a lab rather than in the ground. I believe the prices are quite high though. 

    Post # 18
    Member
    3683 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2012

    I would argue that any naturally occurring mineral that is mined from the earth in certain countries (eg Africa, India) is likely to have some level of morality issue associated with it, its because the profit margins and markup of diamonds is so high that they’ve been targeted.

     

    THIS.  Great alternatives are lab created stones, which will have the same chemical makeup and oftentimes will outperform their natural counterparts.  A few alternatives:

    – Lab created diamonds.  They’re priced similarly to natural diamonds, BUT the growth conditions required for them are time-consuming and expensive.  Gemesis, and DNEA are two companies which make them.

    – Canadian or Australian diamonds.  These countries at least comply with certain labor laws, and you can still have your natural diamond.

    – Moissanite.  It’s a beautiful, clear, durable stone, and really fiery.  It doesn’t perform EXACTLY like a diamond, though, so you might want to see one in person first.

    – Corundum (sapphire and ruby) – A beautiful, durable stone, and you can get lab created versions for A LOT less than other gemstones.  There are white sapphires, but you might want to look at them first – they have different optical properties than diamonds – more of a “glassy” shine.  They are beautiful, but don’t really look like a diamond.  I have a blue sapphire and am really pleased with it – the color and matching with everything thing isn’t as big a deal as I feared it might be.

     

    Hope this helps!

    Post # 19
    Member
    28 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: October 2014

    I chose “other” and my vote is for a lab-grown diamond, but I’m biased since that’s what I have. I ordered mine through Gemesis, but D.Nea and Brilliant Earth both also sell colorless lab-grown diamonds. I ended up going with Gemesis because they had the best prices. Brilliant Earth doesn’t grow the dimaonds like Gemesis and D.Nea, so there is some mark-up on their stones but they do have all recycled metals.

    Post # 20
    Member
    7808 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 1997

    “I would argue that any naturally occurring mineral that is mined from the earth in certain countries (eg Africa, India) is likely to have some level of morality issue associated with it, its because the profit margins and markup of diamonds is so high that they’ve been targeted.”

    True.

    This is not to dismiss the issues with unethically sourced diamonds, but if we are going to talk about artificial prices, how about what happened with the housing market? How about Farm Bills and subsidies for worthless food-stuffs? Consider anything at all with a brand name, from Tiffany to Adidas, and the pricing that comes along with that name/reputation/ad campaign.

    The fact is that anything that cannot keep us warm or fill our bellies is, essentially, “worthless”. And artificial price inflation occurs with ALL goods and services. The decision to view the diamond business as worse than others is a personal one, and one you are entitled to hold, but I don’t buy it. If we all stopped buying diamonds for jewelry, another arbitrary stone would be elevated to the pinnacle position and be highly valued. That’s the way society works. And gold is “worthless” in the same sense that diamonds are – yes, it has some limited value in medicine and technology, but the fact is that humans have valued it for thousands of years. It is actually “worth” anything in the sense that it can keep you alive? Not really, but I don’t see its value or covetability (as an investment or its products) declining anytime soon.

    Any stone, including a diamond, can be damagd. It is just harder to damage a diamond. But insurance is important regardless of what you decide on because of the possibility of damage/theft. Only you can decide what is right for you. But if people took the time to really investigate their food, their clothing, their furniture, and most of the businesses they willingly gave their money to, they would likely be just as outraged.

    Post # 21
    Member
    7808 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 1997

    ^ Again, I haven’t a clue what caused one paragraph to be in a different font size. My apologies.

    Post # 22
    Member
    2953 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    @alaha:  Majority of diamonds sold in the US are conflict-free due to source screening, etc.

    Post # 23
    Member
    71 posts
    Worker bee

    The best way to save the Earth and be conflict free is to buy used ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Post # 24
    Member
    6835 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: August 2013 - Rocky Mountains USA

    @alaha:  Have you thought about buying a used/vintage ring from an antiques dealer, pawn shop, etc?  You can still have your diamond but not contribute whatsoever to the evil diamond industry.  The value is also WAY better than a new ring.

    Post # 25
    Member
    235 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2015

    I love my moissanite ring and chose MoissaniteCo because I wanted white metal (they use 99% recycled metals), a bezel setting, and a clear lab-created stone, but my BFF’s emerald e-ring is from GreenKarat. They use all conflict-free stones (I think some are lab created) and 100% recycled metal. 

    http://www.greenkarat.com/

    Post # 26
    Member
    2248 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2014 - Disney

    @alaha: If you are interested in color change there is a rare sapphire that can be had due to it being realatively unknown on the market for less than alexandrite. My sapphire exhibits what is known as alexandrite shift. Its purple most of the time but we get green outside, blues, browns, burghundies too. These stones come out of 2 mines in tanzania and you’ll have to purchase cutter direct to get one but they are ethical.

    Here is an example of the major shift:

    Post # 28
    Member
    86 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: February 2012

    I vote for lab created diamonds or moissanite!

    The blue colours are to die for with DNEA diamonds

    http://d.neadiamonds.com/

     

    Gemesis has larger whites now ๐Ÿ™‚

    http://gemesis.com/

     

    Or you could go with something even tougher than diamond and less likely to break when you hit it, like I do all the time: moissanite ๐Ÿ™‚

    moissanite.com

     

    Good luck! Remeber to have fun ๐Ÿ™‚

     

    Post # 29
    Member
    5317 posts
    Bee Keeper

    Be careful not to blindly believe everything you read. Know what the author’s hidden agenda is. That “article” is… not very good.

    In any case, sapphires and rubies are absolutely beautiful stones that will hold up to daily wear and are a great choice if clear diamonds aren’t your thing.

    Post # 31
    Member
    1517 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

    For you, I would look at moissanite or lab-created sapphires (which happen to be fabulously affordable, btw. And come in a million colors!)

    The topic ‘Hard Rock – Diamond alternatives’ is closed to new replies.

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